Publications by authors named "Marline Kirsch"

5 Publications

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Comparative Analysis of Mesenchymal Stem Cell Cultivation in Fetal Calf Serum, Human Serum, and Platelet Lysate in 2D and 3D Systems.

Front Bioeng Biotechnol 2020 15;8:598389. Epub 2021 Jan 15.

Institute of Technical Chemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Hanover, Germany.

two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) cultivation of mammalian cells requires supplementation with serum. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are widely used in clinical trials for bioregenerative medicine and in most cases, expansion and differentiation of these cells are required before application. Optimized expansion and differentiation protocols play a key role in the treatment outcome. 3D cell cultivation systems are more comparable to conditions and can provide both, more physiological MSC expansion and a better understanding of intercellular and cell-matrix interactions. Xeno-free cultivation conditions minimize risks of immune response after implantation. Human platelet lysate (hPL) appears to be a valuable alternative to widely used fetal calf serum (FCS) since no ethical issues are associated with its harvest, it contains a high concentration of growth factors and cytokines and it can be produced from expired platelet concentrate. In this study, we analyzed and compared proliferation, as well as osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (hAD-MSC) using three different supplements: FCS, human serum (HS), and hPL in 2D. Furthermore, online monitoring of osteogenic differentiation under the influence of different supplements was performed in 2D. hPL-cultivated MSCs exhibited a higher proliferation and differentiation rate compared to HS- or FCS-cultivated cells. We demonstrated a fast and successful chondrogenic differentiation in the 2D system with the addition of hPL. Additionally, FCS, HS, and hPL were used to formulate Gelatin-methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogels in order to evaluate the influence of the different supplements on the cell spreading and proliferation of cells growing in 3D culture. In addition, the hydrogel constructs were cultivated in media supplemented with three different supplements. In comparison to FCS and HS, the addition of hPL to GelMA hydrogels during the encapsulation of hAD-MSCs resulted in enhanced cell spreading and proliferation. This effect was promoted even further by cultivating the hydrogel constructs in hPL-supplemented media.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fbioe.2020.598389DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7844400PMC
January 2021

Xeno-Free In Vitro Cultivation and Osteogenic Differentiation of hAD-MSCs on Resorbable 3D Printed RESOMER.

Materials (Basel) 2020 Jul 31;13(15). Epub 2020 Jul 31.

Institute of Technical Chemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstraße 5, 30167 Hannover, Germany.

The development of alloplastic resorbable materials can revolutionize the field of implantation technology in regenerative medicine. Additional opportunities to colonize the three-dimensionally (3D) printed constructs with the patient's own cells prior to implantation can improve the regeneration process but requires optimization of cultivation protocols. Human platelet lysate (hPL) has already proven to be a suitable replacement for fetal calf serum (FCS) in 2D and 3D cell cultures. In this study, we investigated the in vitro biocompatibility of the printed RESOMER Filament LG D1.75 materials as well as the osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultivated on 3D printed constructs under the influence of different medium supplements (FCS, human serum (HS) and hPL). Additionally, the in vitro degradation of the material was studied over six months. We demonstrated that LG D1.75 is biocompatible and has no in vitro cytotoxic effects on hMSCs. Furthermore, hMSCs grown on the constructs could be differentiated into osteoblasts, especially supported by supplementation with hPL. Over six months under physiological in vitro conditions, a distinct degradation was observed, which, however, had no influence on the biocompatibility of the material. Thus, the overall suitability of the material LG D1.75 to produce 3D printed, resorbable bone implants and the promising use of hPL in the xeno-free cultivation of human MSCs on such implants for autologous transplantation have been demonstrated.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma13153399DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7436127PMC
July 2020

Gelatin-Methacryloyl (GelMA) Formulated with Human Platelet Lysate Supports Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Differentiation and Enhances the Hydrogel's Mechanical Properties.

Bioengineering (Basel) 2019 Aug 28;6(3). Epub 2019 Aug 28.

Institute of Technical Chemistry, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover, Germany.

Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is a major focus of current research, since cultivation under physiological conditions provides more reliable information about in vivo cell behavior. 3D cell cultures are used in basic research to better understand intercellular and cell-matrix interactions. However, 3D cell culture plays an increasingly important role in the in vitro testing of bioactive substances and tissue engineering. Gelatin-methacryloyl (GelMA) hydrogels of different degrees of functionalization (DoFs) are a versatile tool for 3D cell culture and related applications such as bioprinting. Human platelet lysate (hPL) has already demonstrated positive effects on 2D cell cultures of different cell types and has proven a valuable alternative to fetal calf serum (FCS). Traditionally, all hydrogels are formulated using buffers. In this study, we supplemented GelMA hydrogels of different DoF with hPL during adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell (AD-MSCs) encapsulation. We studied the effect of hPL supplementation on the spreading, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of AD-MSCs. In addition, the influence of hPL on hydrogel properties was also investigated. We demonstrate that the addition of hPL enhanced AD-MSC spreading, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, the addition of hPL also increased GelMA viscosity and stiffness.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bioengineering6030076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6784140PMC
August 2019

Real-Time Live-Cell Imaging Technology Enables High-Throughput Screening to Verify in Vitro Biocompatibility of 3D Printed Materials.

Materials (Basel) 2019 Jul 2;12(13). Epub 2019 Jul 2.

Institute of Technical Chemistry, Leibniz University Hannover, Callinstraße 5, 30167 Hannover, Germany.

With growing advances in three-dimensional (3D) printing technology, the availability and diversity of printing materials has rapidly increased over the last years. 3D printing has quickly become a useful tool for biomedical and various laboratory applications, offering a tremendous potential for efficiently fabricating complex devices in a short period of time. However, there still remains a lack of information regarding the impact of printing materials and post-processing techniques on cell behavior. This study introduces real-time live-cell imaging technology as a fast, user-friendly, and high-throughput screening strategy to verify the in vitro biocompatibility of 3D printed materials. Polyacrylate-based photopolymer material was printed using high-resolution 3D printing techniques, post-processed using three different procedures, and then analyzed with respect to its effects on cell viability, apoptosis, and necrosis of adipogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). When using ethanol for the post-processing procedure and disinfection, no significant effects on MSCs could be detected. For the analyses a novel image-based live-cell analysis system was compared against a biochemical-based standard plate reader assay and traditional flow cytometry. This comparison illustrates the superiority of using image-based detection of in vitro biocompatibility with respect to analysis time, usability, and scientific outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma12132125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6651444PMC
July 2019

Comparison of different three dimensional-printed resorbable materials: In vitro biocompatibility, In vitro degradation rate, and cell differentiation support.

J Biomater Appl 2018 08 13;33(2):281-294. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

1 Institute of Technical Chemistry, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover, Germany.

Biodegradable materials play a crucial role in both material and medical sciences and are frequently used as a primary commodity for implants generation. Due to their material inherent properties, they are supposed to be entirely resorbed by the patients' body after fulfilling their task as a scaffold. This makes a second intervention (e.g. for implant removal) redundant and significantly enhances a patient's post-operative life quality. At the moment, materials for resorbable and biodegradable implants (e.g. polylactic acid or poly-caprolactone polymers) are still intensively studied. They are able to provide mandatory demands such as mechanical strength and attributes needed for high-quality implants. Implants, however, not only need to be made of adequate material, but must also to be personalized in order to meet the customers' needs. Combining three dimensional-printing and high-resolution imaging technologies a new age of implant production comes into sight. Three dimensional images (e.g. magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography) of tissue defects can be utilized as digital blueprints for personalized implants. Modern additive manufacturing devices are able to use a variety of materials to fabricate custom parts within short periods of time. The combination of high-quality resorbable materials and personalized three dimensional-printing for the custom application will provide the patients with the best suitable and sustainable implants. In this study, we evaluated and compared four resorbable and three dimensional printable materials for their in vitro biocompatibility, in vitro rate of degradation, cell adherence and behavior on these materials as well as support of osteogenic differentiation of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The tests were conducted with model constructs of 1 cm surface area fabricated with fused deposition modeling three dimensional-printing technology.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0885328218787219DOI Listing
August 2018
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