Publications by authors named "Marko Korenjak"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: A patient guideline.

JHEP Rep 2021 Oct 17;3(5):100322. Epub 2021 Sep 17.

European Society for Primary Care Gastroenterology.

This patient guideline is intended for all patients at risk of or living with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is the most frequent chronic liver disease worldwide and comes with a high disease burden. Yet, there is a lot of unawareness. Furthermore, many aspects of the disease are still to be unravelled, which has an important impact on the information that is given (or not) to patients. Its management requires a close interaction between patients and their many healthcare providers. It is important for patients to develop a full understanding of NAFLD in order to enable them to take an active role in their disease management. This guide summarises the current knowledge relevant to NAFLD and its management. It has been developed by patients, patient representatives, clinicians and scientists and is based on current scientific recommendations, intended to support patients in making informed decisions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhepr.2021.100322DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8514420PMC
October 2021

Redefining fatty liver disease: an international patient perspective.

Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol 2021 01 5;6(1):73-79. Epub 2020 Oct 5.

Storr Liver Centre, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, Westmead Hospital and University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia. Electronic address:

Despite its increased recognition as a major health threat, fatty liver disease associated with metabolic dysfunction remains largely underdiagnosed and undertreated. An international consensus panel has called for the disease to be renamed from non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to metabolic-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD) and has suggested how the disease should be diagnosed. This Viewpoint explores the call from the perspective of patient advocacy groups. Patients are well aware of the negative consequences of the NAFLD acronym. This advocacy group enthusiastically endorses the call to reframe the disease, which we believe will ultimately have a positive effect on patient care and quality of life and, through this effect, will reduce the burden on health-care systems. For patients, policy makers, health planners, donors, and non-hepatologists, the new acronym MAFLD is clear, squarely placing the disease as a manifestation of metabolic dysfunction and improving understanding at a public health and patient level. The authors from representative patient groups are supportive of this change, particularly as the new acronym is meaningful to all citizens as well as governments and policy makers, and, above all, is devoid of any stigma.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-1253(20)30294-6DOI Listing
January 2021

Endpoints and design of clinical trials in patients with decompensated cirrhosis: Position paper of the LiverHope Consortium.

J Hepatol 2021 01 5;74(1):200-219. Epub 2020 Sep 5.

Liver Unit, Hospital Clínic De Barcelona, Barcelona, School of Medicine and Health Sciences University of Barcelona, Spain; Institut d´Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBEReHD), Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address:

Management of decompensated cirrhosis is currently geared towards the treatment of complications once they occur. To date there is no established disease-modifying therapy aimed at halting progression of the disease and preventing the development of complications in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. The design of clinical trials to investigate new therapies for patients with decompensated cirrhosis is complex. The population of patients with decompensated cirrhosis is heterogeneous (i.e., different etiologies, comorbidities and disease severity), leading to the inclusion of diverse populations in clinical trials. In addition, primary endpoints selected for trials that include patients with decompensated cirrhosis are not homogeneous and at times may not be appropriate. This leads to difficulties in comparing results obtained from different trials. Against this background, the LiverHope Consortium organized a meeting of experts, the goal of which was to develop recommendations for the design of clinical trials and to define appropriate endpoints, both for trials aimed at modifying the natural history and preventing progression of decompensated cirrhosis, as well as for trials aimed at managing the individual complications of cirrhosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2020.08.009DOI Listing
January 2021
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