Publications by authors named "Mark T Ogino"

12 Publications

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ECMO for COVID-19: Updated 2021 Guidelines from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO).

ASAIO J 2021 Feb 26. Epub 2021 Feb 26.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington, USA Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, University of Washington, USA General ICU, University Hospital of Parma, Italy Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Texas Children's Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine Children's Medical Center of Dallas, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Extracorporeal Life Support Organization, President; Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, USA Center for Acute Respiratory Failure, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA University of Michigan Department of Critical Care, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust Centre for Human & Applied Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine, King's College London Sorbonne Université, INSERM, Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition Service de médecine intensive-réanimation, Institut de Cardiologie, APHP Sorbonne Université Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, F-75013 PARIS, France Department of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery - Maastricht University Medical Centre - Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht Maastricht, The Netherlands Department of Internal Medicine II, University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany Nemours Children's Health System Congenital Heart Center, Departments of Surgery and Pediatrics, University of Florida, Gainesville, USA Intensive Care Unit, Alfred Health Melbourne, Victoria, Australia Critical Care ECMO service, King Saud Medical City - Ministry Of Health (MOH), Riyadh - Saudi Arabia. Fundación Cardiovascular de Colombia Service de Médecine Intensive-Réanimation, Institut de Cardiologie, AP-HP, Sorbonne Université Hôpital Pitié-Salpêtrière, Paris, France. Sorbonne Université, GRC n°30, GRC RESPIRE, INSERM, UMRS_1166-ICAN, Institute of Cardiometabolism and Nutrition, Paris, France. Adult Intensive Care Services, The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia National University Hospital, Singapore Department of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, USA Center for Acute Respiratory Failure, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, USA.

This is an updated guideline from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) for the role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) for patients with severe cardiopulmonary failure due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The great majority of COVID-19 patients (>90%) requiring ECMO have been supported using venovenous (V-V) ECMO for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). While COVID-19 ECMO run duration may be longer than in non-COVID-19 ECMO patients, published mortality appears to be similar between the two groups. However, data collection is ongoing, and there is a signal that overall mortality may be increasing. Conventional selection criteria for COVID-19-related ECMO should be used; however, when resources become more constrained during a pandemic, more stringent contraindications should be implemented. Formation of regional ECMO referral networks may facilitate communication, resource sharing, expedited patient referral, and mobile ECMO retrieval. There are no data to suggest deviation from conventional ECMO device or patient management when applying ECMO for COVID-19 patients. Rarely, children may require ECMO support for COVID-19-related ARDS, myocarditis or multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C); conventional selection criteria and management practices should be the standard. We strongly encourage participation in data submission to investigate the optimal use of ECMO for COVID-19.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAT.0000000000001422DOI Listing
February 2021

Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Coronavirus Disease 2019 Interim Guidelines: A Consensus Document from an International Group of Interdisciplinary Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Providers.

ASAIO J 2020 Jul;66(7):707-721

The Alfred, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Disclaimer: The Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO) Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Guidelines have been developed to assist existing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) centers to prepare and plan provision of ECMO during the ongoing pandemic. The recommendations have been put together by a team of interdisciplinary ECMO providers from around the world. Recommendations are based on available evidence, existing best practice guidelines, ethical principles, and expert opinion. This is a living document and will be regularly updated when new information becomes available. ELSO is not liable for the accuracy or completeness of the information in this document. These guidelines are not meant to replace sound clinical judgment or specialist consultation but rather to strengthen provision and clinical management of ECMO specifically, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAT.0000000000001193DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7228451PMC
July 2020

The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients: a review of a multicenter database.

Perfusion 2020 11 6;35(8):772-777. Epub 2020 Mar 6.

Mediclinic Parkview Hospital, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

Aim: We chose to evaluate the survival of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation among patients with human immunodeficiency virus in a multicenter registry.

Methods: Retrospective case review of the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Registry respiratory failure of all patients with human immunodeficiency virus supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

Results: A total of 126 patients were included. Survival to discharge was 36%. Eight infants were supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and three (37.5%) survived to discharge. Respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was the primary indication (78%) with a 39% survival, while cardiac and extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation indications accounted for 16% and 6% of patients with survivals of 30% and 12.5%, respectively. These differences did not reach significance. There were no significant differences between survivors and non-survivors in demographic data, but non-survivors had significantly more non-human immunodeficiency virus pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation infections than survivors. There were no differences in other pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supportive therapies, mechanical ventilator settings, or arterial blood gas results between survivors and non-survivors. The median duration of mechanical ventilation prior to cannulation was 52 (interquartile range: 13-140) hours, while the median duration of the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation exposure was 237 (interquartile range: 125-622) hours. Ventilator settings were significantly lower after 24 hours compared to pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation settings. Complications during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation exposure including receipt of renal replacement therapy, inotropic infusions, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation were more common among non-survivors compared to survivors. Central nervous system complications were rare.

Conclusion: Survival among patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection who receive extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was less than 40%. Infections before extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannulation occurred more often in non-survivors. The receipt of renal replacement therapy, inotropic infusions, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation was associated with worse outcome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659120906966DOI Listing
November 2020

Position Paper on Global Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Education and Educational Agenda for the Future: A Statement From the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization ECMOed Taskforce.

Crit Care Med 2020 03;48(3):406-414

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Nemours Alfred I duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE.

Objectives: The purpose of this position paper is two-fold: first, to describe the state of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation education worldwide, noting current limitations and challenges; and second, to put forth an educational agenda regarding opportunities for an international collaborative approach toward standardization.

Design: Relevant medical literature was reviewed through literature search, and materials from national organizations were accessed through the Internet. Taskforce members generated a consensus statement using an iterative consensus process through teleconferences and electronic communication.

Setting: In 2018, the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization convened the ECMOed Taskforce at two structured, face-to-face meetings of 40 healthcare practitioners and educators with expertise in caring for the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patient and in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation education.

Patients: None.

Interventions: None.

Measurements And Main Results: The ECMOed Taskforce identified seven educational domains that would benefit from international collaborative efforts. Of primary importance, the Taskforce outlined actionable items regarding 1) the creation of a standardized extracorporeal membrane oxygenation curriculum; 2) defining criteria for an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation course as a vehicle for delivering the curriculum; 3) outlining a mechanism for evaluating the quality of educational offerings; 4) utilizing validated assessment tools in the development of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation practitioner certification; and 5) promoting high-quality educational research to guide ongoing educational and competency assessment development.

Conclusions: Significant variability and limitations in global extracorporeal membrane oxygenation education exist. In this position paper, we outline a road map for standardizing international extracorporeal membrane oxygenation education and practitioner certification. Ongoing high-quality educational research is needed to evaluate the impact of these initiatives.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000004158DOI Listing
March 2020

Awake Neonatal Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

ASAIO J 2020 05;66(5):e70-e73

From the Department of Pediatrics, Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, Delaware.

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used in patients with acute respiratory failure that is not responsive to conventional management. The practice of awake ECMO has become an area of interest but with limited data and experience. Most reported experience comes from adult and pediatric populations. Traditional management of these patients still includes mechanical ventilator support and often requires the use of sedatives for provision of safe care. We present a series of eight neonates who were electively extubated while on ECMO, with expanded discussion of two representative cases. We discuss the rationale for extubation and outcomes. The greatest benefit of this management was seen in patients with significant air leak, and in no reported case did we experience any adverse effects or complications as a direct result of extubation while on ECMO. In conclusion, in our experience, awake neonatal ECMO appears safe and effective and may offer significant advantages over traditional management in certain clinical scenarios. Prospective comparison trials are warranted to further investigate the clinical benefits and risks of awake neonatal ECMO.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAT.0000000000001029DOI Listing
May 2020

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in a Pediatric Patient with Hepatopulmonary Syndrome and Interrupted Inferior Vena Cava After Living Related Liver Donation.

ASAIO J 2019 Mar/Apr;65(3):e27-e29

From the Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE.

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used for cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) occurs in the setting of liver failure and may cause hypoxemia. Previous reports have described the use of ECMO for HPS after liver transplant. Our patient is a 19-month-old female with biliary atresia, an interrupted inferior vena cava, and HPS on 8 liters per minute of high-flow oxygen. Following liver transplantation, her postoperative course was complicated by severe hypoxemia requiring ECMO. Due to her interrupted inferior vena cava, our standard bi-caval cannula could not be used. Hence, a 16-French double lumen venovenous right internal jugular to right atrial cannula was used to provide extracorporeal life support. She was decannulated after 17 days, remained intubated for 2 days, and weaned to room air over the next 3 weeks. This is the third pediatric liver transplant patient supported with ECMO identified in the literature, and the youngest and smallest of those reported. This approach to cannulation is unique because of the use of a double lumen venovenous cannula for HPS in a child, selected due to complex anatomy. Posttransplant ECMO may provide pediatric patients with HPS and posttransplant hypoxemia a period of support for their pulmonary remodeling and recovery from HPS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAT.0000000000000792DOI Listing
March 2020

Venovenous extracorporeal life support in patients with HIV infection and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

Perfusion 2018 09 10;33(6):433-437. Epub 2018 Mar 10.

6 INOVA Fairfax Medical Center, Fairfax, Virginia, USA.

Aim: As experience with extracorporeal life support (ECLS) increases, indications for its use have expanded to diverse patient populations, including those with HIV infection. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is a particularly devastating complication of HIV infections. The objective of this study was to review ECLS use in HIV-positive patients, with particular emphasis on those with concomitant PJP infection.

Methods: All patients were treated by the same ECLS team, consisting of an ECLS specialist intensivist, cardiothoracic surgeon and allied medical professionals at three healthcare institutions. The same ECLS protocol was utilized for all patients during the study period. A retrospective review was performed for all HIV-positive patients placed on ECLS from May 2011 to October 2014. Demographic, clinical, ECLS and complication data were reviewed to identify risk factors for death.

Results: A total of 22 HIV-positive patients received ECLS therapy during the study period. All patients were supported with venovenous ECLS and overall survival to hospital discharge was 68%. Survival amongst the PJP positive cohort was 60%. Non-survivors were more likely to require inotropic medications on ECLS (100% non-survivors vs. 46.7% survivors, p=0.022) and had a longer total duration of ECLS (13 days non-survivors vs. 7 days survivors, p=0.011). No difference was observed between PJP-positive and PJP-negative patients with regard to demographic data, complication rates or survival.

Conclusion: ECLS is a viable treatment option in carefully selected HIV-positive patients, including those with severe disease as manifested by PJP infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0267659118765595DOI Listing
September 2018

Lung Rest During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Neonatal Respiratory Failure-Practice Variations and Outcomes.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2017 Jul;18(7):667-674

1Department of Pediatrics, Nemours, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE. 2Center for Pediatric Lung Research, Nemours, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE. 3Department of Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. 4Biostatistics Core, Nemours, Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, Wilmington, DE. 5Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA.

Objective: Describe practice variations in ventilator strategies used for lung rest during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for respiratory failure in neonates, and assess the potential impact of various lung rest strategies on the duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the duration of mechanical ventilation after decannulation.

Data Sources: Retrospective cohort analysis from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization registry database during the years 2008-2013.

Study Selection: All extracorporeal membrane oxygenation runs for infants less than or equal to 30 days of life for pulmonary reasons were included.

Data Extraction: Ventilator type and ventilator settings used for lung rest at 24 hours after extracorporeal membrane oxygenation initiation were obtained.

Data Synthesis: A total of 3,040 cases met inclusion criteria. Conventional mechanical ventilation was used for lung rest in 88% of cases and high frequency ventilation was used in 12%. In the conventional mechanical ventilation group, 32% used positive end-expiratory pressure strategy of 4-6 cm H2O (low), 22% used 7-9 cm H2O (mid), and 43% used 10-12 cm H2O (high). High frequency ventilation was associated with an increased mean (SEM) hours of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (150.2 [0.05] vs 125 [0.02]; p < 0.001) and an increased mean (SEM) hours of mechanical ventilation after decannulation (135 [0.09] vs 100.2 [0.03]; p = 0.002), compared with conventional mechanical ventilation among survivors. Within the conventional mechanical ventilation group, use of higher positive end-expiratory pressure was associated with a decreased mean (SEM) hours of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (high vs low: 136 [1.06] vs 156 [1.06], p = 0.001; mid vs low: 141 [1.06] vs 156 [1.06]; p = 0.04) but increased duration of mechanical ventilation after decannulation in the high positive end-expiratory pressure group compared with low positive end-expiratory pressure (p = 0.04) among survivors.

Conclusions: Wide practice variation exists with regard to ventilator settings used for lung rest during neonatal respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Use of high frequency ventilation when compared with conventional mechanical ventilation and use of low positive end-expiratory pressure strategy when compared with mid positive end-expiratory pressure and high positive end-expiratory pressure strategy is associated with longer duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Further research to provide evidence to drive optimization of pulmonary management during neonatal respiratory extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is warranted.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001171DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5503755PMC
July 2017

Setup and maintenance of extracorporeal life support programs.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2013 Jun;14(5 Suppl 1):S84-93

Departments of Critical Care Medicine and Paediatrics, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Setting up an extracorporeal life support program requires motivated experts, institutional commitment, and an interprofessional team of healthcare providers with dedicated time, space, and resources. This article provides guidance on the key steps involved in the process of developing a sustainable extracorporeal membrane oxygenation program, based on guidelines from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization and from an international perspective.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0b013e318292e528DOI Listing
June 2013

Transthoracic echocardiography visualization of bicaval dual lumen catheters for veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

J Clin Ultrasound 2012 Mar-Apr;40(3):183-6. Epub 2012 Jan 12.

Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859, USA.

Bicaval dual lumen catheters improve the efficiency of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation by minimizing recirculation with an innovative design, which requires precise placement of three catheter ports in the superior vena cava, right atrium, and inferior vena cava, respectively. However, the exact position of these catheter ports is usually not known during placement because they cannot be visualized with conventional radiography. We performed a retrospective review of our experience over the past year using transthoracic echocardiography to evaluate the position of the catheter ports. From a subcostal, sagittal imaging approach, we were able to identify all three catheter ports in 11 of 11 studies. At least one of the catheter ports was incorrectly positioned in 5 of 11 studies. Further prospective evaluation is necessary to determine if catheter repositioning based on transthoracic echocardiography findings can further improve the clinical efficiency of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jcu.21873DOI Listing
August 2012