Publications by authors named "Mark P Orbe"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

"Context Matters:" An Exploration of Young Adult Social Constructions of Meaning About Death and Dying.

Health Commun 2019 02 17;34(2):139-148. Epub 2017 Oct 17.

a School of Communication , Western Michigan University.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2017.1384436DOI Listing
February 2019

Abstinence Memorable Message Narratives: A New Exploratory Research Study Into Young Adult Sexual Narratives.

Health Commun 2015 3;30(12):1201-12. Epub 2014 Nov 3.

b School of Communication , Western Michigan University.

Abstinence for most adolescent-aged college students relates to several factors, including strong religious beliefs, an aversion to taking risks, high career expectations, or limited attractiveness. Young adults receive hundreds of messages from various sources; therefore, understanding their memorable sexual messages is essential. This exploratory research uses an interpretive method to unravel the memorable sexual narratives of 65 virgin respondents. Findings yield two primary themes: involuntary abstinence, and conscious abstinence, which demonstrate that messages of abstinence are important yet often imbue punitive internal attitudes and beliefs derived from mainstream media and peer relationships. The article concludes with a recommendation for health practitioners and communication scholars to create positive open spaces where young adults can discuss sexuality, sexual relationships, and sexual behaviors. Additionally, understanding stigmas related to abstinence helps reframe normative sex communication messages and promote constructive short- and long-term sexual health behaviors.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10410236.2014.924045DOI Listing
January 2017

Theorizing multidimensional identity negotiation: reflections on the lived experiences of first-generation college students.

Authors:
Mark P Orbe

New Dir Child Adolesc Dev 2008 (120):81-95

Gender and Women's Studies Program, Western Michigan University, USA.

Drawing from recent research on first-generation college (FGC) students, this chapter advances an interdisciplinary theoretical framework for understanding how these students enact multiple aspects of their personal, cultural, and social identities. I use dialectical and cross-cultural adaptation theories as a foundation to extend examinations of how diverse FGC students negotiate the alien culture of the academy against that of home. In this regard, college is situated as a pivotal point of development, and successful negotiation of identity tensions is represented as a key factor in academic success.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cd.217DOI Listing
September 2008

Food, culture, and family: exploring the coordinated management of meaning regarding childhood obesity.

Health Commun 2005 ;18(2):155-75

Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008, USA.

Increased rates of childhood obesity combined with more accessible information about the relationship between diet, physical activity and inactivity, and chronic diseases suggest the need for analyzing the complex process of receiving and transmitting messages related to child feeding practices. This study examined the perceptions of childhood obesity within 1 multiethnic community, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. In particular, through the use of focus groups, individuals indicated that sociocultural, familial, and official nutritional messages were most influential to their health care behaviors. The coordinated management of meaning (CMM) theory was used to gain insight into how individuals negotiate competing messages occurring at different levels of meaning. Given its focus on cultural influences (parallel to the concepts of archetypes), CMM proved especially relevant for understanding child feeding beliefs, values, attitudes, and practices in diverse ethnic populations. Implications for future health communication research that might draw from a CMM approach were identified, as well as pragmatic endeavors that focus on the development, implementation, and evaluation of culturally appropriate interventions in the prevention of childhood obesity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1207/s15327027hc1802_4DOI Listing
December 2005