Publications by authors named "Mark James Hamilton"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

"Electrifying dysmorphology": Potassium channelopathies causing dysmorphic syndromes.

Adv Genet 2020 26;105:137-174. Epub 2020 May 26.

Nottingham Clinical Genetics Service, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, City Hospital Campus, Nottingham, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Potassium channels are a heterogeneous group of membrane-bound proteins, whose functions support a diverse range of biological processes. Genetic disorders arising from mutations in potassium channels are classically recognized by symptoms arising from acute channel dysfunction, such as periodic paralysis, ataxia, seizures, or cardiac conduction abnormalities, often in a patient with otherwise normal examination findings. In this chapter, we review a distinct subgroup of rare potassium channelopathies whose presentations are instead suggestive of a developmental disorder, with features including intellectual disability, craniofacial dysmorphism or other physical anomalies. Known conditions within this subgroup are: Andersen-Tawil syndrome, Birk-Barel syndrome, CantĂș syndrome, Keppen-Lubinsky syndrome, Temple-Baraitser syndrome, Zimmerman-Laband syndrome and a very similar disorder called Bauer-Tartaglia or FHEIG syndrome. Ion channelopathies are unlikely to be routinely considered in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with developmental concerns, and so detailed description and photographs of the clinical phenotype are provided to aid recognition. For several of these disorders, functional characterization of the genetic mutations responsible has led to identification of candidate therapies, including drugs already commonly used for other indications, which adds further impetus to their prompt recognition. Together, these cases illustrate the potential for mechanistic insights gained from genetic diagnosis to drive translational work toward targeted, disease-modifying therapies for rare disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.adgen.2020.03.002DOI Listing
January 2021

CDK13-related disorder.

Adv Genet 2019 11;103:163-182. Epub 2018 Dec 11.

Nottingham Clinical Genetics Service, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, United Kingdom. Electronic address:

Mutations in CDK13 have recently been identified as a novel cause of syndromic intellectual disability. In this chapter, we review the 44 cases of CDK13-related disorder reported to date, highlighting key clinical pointers to this diagnosis including characteristic craniofacial features, feeding difficulties in infancy, and the presence of structural heart or brain malformations. The spectrum of reported mutations is also described, demonstrating an excess of missense mutations arising in the protein kinase domain. Exploration of genotype-phenotype correlations suggests a trend toward milder phenotypes in patients with mutations predicted to cause haploinsufficiency of CDK13, while missense mutations affecting amino acid residue 842 appear most likely to be associated with structural malformations. The greater phenotypic impact of missense variants is hypothesized to occur due to a dominant-negative mechanism, by which the mutant protein acts to sequester cyclin K in inactive complexes. Functional studies to validate this hypothesis have not yet been carried out, however. Differential diagnosis and recommendations for clinical care of patients with CDK13-related disorder are also described, emphasizing baseline echocardiography, vigilance for feeding and swallowing difficulties, and regular developmental evaluation as key components of care. Finally, future directions for CDK13 research are discussed, including the need to resolve uncertainty regarding pathogenicity of CDK13 haploinsufficiency, and to gather further longitudinal data from large cohorts in order to inform the clinical care of patients with this diagnosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.adgen.2018.11.001DOI Listing
November 2019

Growing up with spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress (SMARD1).

Neuromuscul Disord 2015 Feb 22;25(2):169-71. Epub 2014 Oct 22.

Fraser of Allander Neurosciences Unit, Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Spinal muscular atrophy with respiratory distress type 1 (SMARD1) is an inherited neuromuscular condition resulting from recessive mutations in the immunoglobulin mu-binding protein (IGHMBP2) gene. Affected individuals characteristically present in infancy with progressive distal weakness and respiratory distress secondary to diaphragmatic weakness. Considerable clinical heterogeneity has been described both in its presentation and phenotype in childhood; however little data pertaining to phenotype in adulthood have been reported to date. This report describes a 21 year old woman with genetically confirmed SMARD1 who has stable muscle weakness, normal cognitive abilities and is able to lead a socially integrated lifestyle, using mechanical ventilation only overnight. This report adds new evidence for clinical variability throughout the course of SMARD1.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nmd.2014.10.005DOI Listing
February 2015

Chromosomal microarray analysis for looked after children: a double-edged sword?

Arch Dis Child 2015 Feb 26;100(2):206-7. Epub 2014 Sep 26.

School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2014-307189DOI Listing
February 2015