Publications by authors named "Marissa E Baron"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Patient Selection for Pedal Soft Tissue Augmentation.

Aesthet Surg J Open Forum 2020 Sep 24;2(3):ojaa031. Epub 2020 Jun 24.

School of Medicine and the Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA.

Background: Pedal fat grafting has been shown to improve pain and functional impairment from forefoot fat pad atrophy.

Objectives: The authors aimed to determine if patient demographics and foot characteristics play a role in the level of impact that is achieved following surgery.

Methods: The authors performed a retrospective review of patients who received forefoot autologous fat injections for the treatment of pedal fat pad atrophy. Patient improvement of pain and functional impairment were evaluated for correlation with patient characteristics, including gender, age, BMI, unilateral vs bilateral injections, flexible vs rigid arch, previous foot deformity or surgery, and presence of callus.

Results: Forty-four patients received fat injections into the ball of their foot; 73% of them were women; their mean age was 61 years, and mean BMI was 26.6 kg/m; 75% had injections performed bilaterally; 41% had a flexible arch, 73% had a past history of pedal deformity or surgery, and 43% had callus. Only female gender was found to correlate with an improvement in pain from the time of surgery to 12 months later ( = 0.02).

Conclusions: Bilateral rigid, high arched foot type is a risk factor for foot pain and disproportionately represented among these patients. The only patient characteristic found to be correlated with improvement in pain at 12 months post-surgery was female gender. BMI and laterality of injections impacted the course of improvement after surgery. Given current data, all patients with suspected pedal fat pad atrophy should be considered for soft tissue augmentation.

Level Of Evidence 4:
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/asjof/ojaa031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7671290PMC
September 2020

Undiagnosed Normocephalic Pancraniosynostosis Presenting as Bilateral Abducens Nerve Palsy.

J Craniofac Surg 2021 Jan-Feb 01;32(1):270-272

Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA.

Abstract: Primary pancraniosynostosis is a rare variant of craniosynostosis in which the major cranial sutures prematurely fuse. Single-suture craniosynostosis is often recognized early in life due to an abnormal head shape. In contrast, primary pancraniosynostosis may be diagnosed later in life due to a grossly normal head shape and size. As such, these children can present with symptoms related to chronically elevated intracranial pressure (eg, vision loss or cognitive impairment). This report highlights a patient with primary pancraniosynostosis associated with unique neurologic sequelae-namely, bilateral abducens nerve palsy. A 9-year-old boy presented to the ophthalmologist with a 1-month history of double vision, drifting of his right eye toward the nasal bridge, and intracranial hypertension evident with papilledema. Physical examination was notable for mild bitemporal narrowing. A computed tomography study demonstrated radiologic thumbprinting, diffuse osseous sclerosis, and fusion of the bilateral coronal, sagittal, metopic, and lambdoid sutures. The patient underwent emergent cranial vault expansion with fronto-orbital advancement. Papilledema had resolved 4 months following surgery. At 2-year follow-up, abducens nerve palsy and head shape were significantly improved. This study brings attention to an unreported presenting symptom of pancraniosynostosis (bilateral abducens nerve palsy). This information may lead to quicker diagnosis and treatment of pancraniosynostosis-induced intracranial hypertension, which is critical to prevent long-term sequelae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/SCS.0000000000007018DOI Listing
September 2020