Publications by authors named "Marion Mosca"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Extra-auricular lesions of proliferative and necrotizing otitis externa in three kittens.

Vet Dermatol 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Université de Lyon, VetAgro Sup, UP ICE, Marcy l'Etoile, F-69280, France.

Background: Proliferative and necrotising otitis externa (PNOE) is a rare disorder in cats with poorly understood pathogenesis. Extra-auricular (EA) lesions recently have been mentioned in a textbook and in one case report.

Objectives: To describe EA lesions associated with PNOE in three kittens.

Animals: A 6-month-old female domestic short hair (DSH) cat (Case 1), an 8-month-old female DSH cat (Case 2) and a 5-month-old female DSH cat (Case 3).

Methods And Results: All cases exhibited classical lesions of PNOE associated with EA lesions, generalised (cases 1 and 3) or limited to eyelids (Case 2). Lesions were characterised by thick, adherent, hyperkeratotic papules coalescing to plaques and attempts to remove the hyperkeratotic plaques resulted in erosions. Histopathological examinations revealed classical features of PNOE: severe acanthosis associated with a marked lymphocytic exocytosis, satellitosis and apoptotic keratinocytes at all levels of the epidermis and the outer root sheath of hair follicles. Cases 2 and 3 resolved spontaneously. Case 1 remained stable with topical tacrolimus and oral prednisolone after a short course of ciclosporin.

Conclusions And Clinical Importance: This report describes EA lesions of PNOE in three kittens. Such lesions may be underdiagnosed, and this report emphasises the role of a thorough clinical inspection in PNOE cases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12968DOI Listing
May 2021

Long-term successful treatment of a donkey with cutaneous lupus erythematous with methotrexate.

Vet Dermatol 2020 Aug 15;31(4):313-e78. Epub 2020 Apr 15.

Université Lumière Lyon 2, VetAgro Sup, UP Interactions Cellules Environnement, 1 Avenue Bourgelat, 69280, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Cutaneous lupus erythematosus (CLE) is a rare immune-mediated dermatitis. To the best of the authors' knowledge it has not been described in donkeys. A 5-year-old male neutered donkey, living in south-east France, was diagnosed with CLE. Clinical signs included generalized symmetrical areas of alopecia, erythema, crusting and scales. Diagnostic tests included examination of skin biopsy samples by histopathological and immunohistochemical analysis which demonstrated an interface dermatitis with CD8+ T cells. The skin condition was successfully treated initially with glucocorticoids and methotrexate; successful long-term maintenance was associated with administration of methotrexate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12847DOI Listing
August 2020

Equine pastern vasculitis in a horse associated with a multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate.

Vet Dermatol 2020 Jun 12;31(3):247-e55. Epub 2020 Jan 12.

UP Interactions Cellules Environnement, VetAgro Sup, Université de Lyon, 1 Avenue Bourgelat, 69280, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Background: Equine pastern vasculitis is an uncommon disorder in horses. Underlying causes are difficult to assess, especially bacterial infections.

Clinical Summary: A 13-year-old French saddle gelding horse presented for evaluation of a six weeks history of pastern dermatitis. Histopathological examination of skin biopsy samples revealed small vessel vasculitis. A pure growth of a multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MRPA) was obtained from a deep skin biopsy. Clinical remission was observed after a six week course of enrofloxacin and lesions did not recur.

Conclusions And Clinical Importance: To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of a pastern vasculitis associated with MRPA and successfully treated with a six week course of enrofloxacin.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12830DOI Listing
June 2020

Granulomatous mural folliculitis in a dog treated with ciclosporin and methotrexate.

Vet Dermatol 2020 Apr 6;31(2):170-174. Epub 2020 Jan 6.

VetAgro Sup, UP Interactions Cellules Environnement, Université de Lyon, 1 Avenue Bourgelat, 69280, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Background: Canine granulomatous mural folliculitis is a very rare cause of scarring alopecia with unknown pathogenesis.

Hypothesis/objectives: To report a case of granulomatous mural folliculitis in a dog treated with ciclosporin (Cs) and methotrexate (MTX).

Animal: A 13-year-old spayed female Pyrenean shepherd dog with a one month history of scarring alopecia.

Methods And Results: Histopathological examination revealed a granulomatous and lymphocytic mural and necrotizing folliculitis and furunculosis. Immunochemistry, using antibodies for CD3, CD204, CD206, IBA-1 and CD208, revealed that CD3 lymphocytes were infiltrating the outer root sheath along with IBA-1 or CD204 cells. Ciclosporin (5 mg/kg once daily) and MTX (0.25 mg/kg once weekly then 0.5 mg/kg once weekly) were initiated simultaneously, and Cs was stopped after stabilization of the lesions. The dog's skin disease was stable for six months.

Conclusions And Clinical Importance: To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of the long-term management of a granulomatous mural folliculitis in a dog. Ciclosporin and MTX appeared to be an effective treatment option. Additional treated cases are needed to assess the effectiveness of MTX in canine immune-mediated diseases.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12825DOI Listing
April 2020

Efficacy of two formulations of afoxolaner (NexGard® and NexGard Spectra®) for the treatment of generalised demodicosis in dogs, in veterinary dermatology referral centers in Europe.

Parasit Vectors 2018 Sep 10;11(1):506. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, 29 avenue Tony Garnier, 69007, Lyon, France.

Background: A multi-centre field trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of afoxolaner based chewables (NexGard® or NexGard Spectra®) for the treatment of generalised demodicosis caused by Demodex canis in dogs under field conditions in France, Italy and Poland.

Methods: Client-owned dogs, diagnosed positive for Demodex mites by pre-treatment skin scrapings and presenting clinical signs of generalised demodicosis were included. Dogs were orally treated with afoxolaner three times at monthly intervals. Of the 50 dogs enrolled, 48 completed the whole study. Efficacy of the treatments was assessed monthly by Demodex mite counts and physical examination with special regard to the severity and extension of skin lesions.

Results: Treatments were well tolerated in all dogs and resulted in a rapid reduction of mites, with all post-treatment mite counts significantly lower than baseline. The number of mites was reduced by 87.6%, 96.5% and 98.1% on Days 28, 56 and 84, respectively. In addition, the skin lesion severity and extent scores as well as the pruritus were all significantly lower at all post-treatment visits compared to the pre-treatment assessment.

Conclusions: This clinical field study demonstrated that monthly administrations of afoxolaner in NexGard® or NexGard Spectra®, offered a convenient and reliable solution for the treatment of canine generalised demodicosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13071-018-3083-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131853PMC
September 2018

Pharmacokinetics of low-dose methotrexate in healthy beagle dogs.

J Vet Pharmacol Ther 2018 Oct 12;41(5):659-669. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Interaction Cellule Environnement, Unité Pharmacologie et Toxicologie, VetAgro Sup-Campus Vétérinaire de Lyon, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Methotrexate may be an alternative to ciclosporin in the treatment of canine atopic dermatitis (cAD) as suggested by recent data. The aim of the study was to investigate both the tolerance and the pharmacokinetic behavior of methotrexate (MTX) in plasma, following intravenous (i.v.), subcutaneous (s.c.) or oral (OR) administration over several weeks. Six healthy dogs were given oral MTX once a week, respectively, per dog at 2.5 mg/1 week, 5 mg/4 weeks, 7.5 mg/3 weeks, 10 mg/6 weeks and 12.5 mg/5 weeks. No clinically relevant abnormalities of laboratory parameters were noticed. A high inter-individual variation of MTX plasma concentration was observed with a suspicion of saturation phenomenon in absorption. To compare with other routes of administration, six healthy beagle dogs followed a crossover design study at 7.5 mg per dog MTX. The absolute bioavailability was 93% for SC injection and 30% for the oral route. The inter-individual variability was quite low following SC administration compared to oral route. Just as in human, given the substantial variability of oral absorption, clinicians cannot assume consistent oral bioavailability of MTX. Therefore, they may consider switching dogs to the SC route in case of absence of clinical response with a weekly oral dose.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvp.12673DOI Listing
October 2018

Skin lesions in Aubrac cows strongly associated with fly bites (Haematobia irritans).

Vet Dermatol 2018 Jun 1;29(3):254-e94. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

UP Interactions Cellules Environnement, VetAgro Sup, Université de Lyon, 1 Avenue Bourgelat, 69280, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Background: The horn fly Haematobia irritans is known to cause problems in cattle including weight loss and decreased milk production; cutaneous lesions have not been widely reported and descriptions of the clinical manifestations are quite variable.

Hypothesis/objectives: This study describes the clinical and histopathological lesions of several Aubrac cows that presented with focal to confluent areas of alopecia, skin scaling and thickening, suspected to be induced by H. irritans bites.

Animals: Twenty seven, three- to six-year-old Aubrac cows, kept in mountain pastures in France, that presented with an apparently asymptomatic alopecic dermatosis.

Methods: Samples for skin cytological evaluation, skin scrapings and trichograms were examined; also, skin biopsy specimens from affected animals were used for histopathological examination.

Results: Clinical lesions consisted of focal to coalescing, symmetrical areas of hair loss and scaling, located on the back, flanks, and lateral and caudal aspects of the thighs. Histopathological examination revealed perivascular, oedematous, eosinophilic dermatitis with eosinophilic folliculitis and furunculosis. Species identification of several flies captured on the cows revealed H. irritans. The final clinicopathological diagnosis was eosinophilic dermatitis and folliculitis and furunculosis, suspected to be due to H. irritans fly-bite.

Conclusion And Clinical Importance: Fly-bite (H. irritans) dermatitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of alopecic dermatoses in cows.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12530DOI Listing
June 2018

Clinical and histopathological aspects of an alopecia syndrome in captive Andean bears (Tremarctos ornatus).

Vet Dermatol 2018 Jun 31;29(3):234-e85. Epub 2018 Jan 31.

VetAgro Sup, UP Interactions Cellules Environnement, Univ Lyon, 1 Avenue Bourgelat, 69280, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Background: Captive Andean bears (Tremarctos ornatus) develop a distinct alopecic syndrome of unknown aetiology.

Hypothesis/objectives: To describe the histological features of healthy Andean bear skin, to define the clinical and histopathological features of Andean bears with signs of alopecia, and to propose an aetiopathogenesis.

Animals: Eighteen healthy Andean bears housed in 12 European zoos and 13 Andean bears with mild to severe alopecia housed in nine European zoos.

Methods: Two surveys describing signalment and clinical features of affected bears; follicular density was measured in a single healthy bear using a dermatoscope; cytological samples were collected by tape stripping from two healthy and three alopecic bears; skin biopsies were collected for histological evaluation from healthy and alopecic bears; immunohistochemistry (CD3, AE1/AE3 cytokeratins) was performed when lymphocytic inflammation was observed.

Results: The syndrome is an acquired, slowly progressive alopecia. Bears are otherwise healthy. Histological features include a dermal inflammatory infiltrate composed of T lymphocytes and eosinophils; atrophy of hair follicles at the level of or below the isthmus, and lymphocytic infiltration of hair follicles and the epidermis. Multinucleated giant cells were present in the outer root sheaths of hair follicles in five bears.

Conclusion And Clinical Importance: Andean bear alopecia syndrome is an acquired, progressive alopecia with histological features consistent with a lymphocytic immune-mediated reaction directed against follicular sheaths and the epidermis. Trigger factors have not been identified. Further studies are indicated to define the features of this multifactorial syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12522DOI Listing
June 2018

Successful medical treatment of an Aspergillus terreus mycetoma of the nostril/lip in a 16-year-old Fjord pony gelding with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction.

Vet Dermatol 2017 Dec 23;28(6):629-e155. Epub 2017 Jul 23.

VetAgro Sup, Veterinary Campus of Lyon, University of Lyon, 69280, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Background: Mycetoma is a chronic, proliferative lesion of cutaneous/subcutaneous tissue characterized by draining tracts and granules in the discharge caused by actinomycetes (actinomycetoma) or filamentous fungi (eumycotic mycetoma).

Objectives: This case report describes the unusual finding of a cutaneous mycetoma of the lateral wing of the right nostril in a gelding.

Animal: A 16-year-old Fjord gelding with suspected pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) was presented for evaluation of a nonpainful, firm and raised mass involving the lateral wing of the right nostril and the lip.

Methods And Results: Cytological examination of the mass showed marked pyogranulomatous inflammation and histopathological examination revealed a fungal mycetoma. Fungal culture identified the causative organism as Aspergillus terreus, which is not known for its propensity to cause either dermal granulomas or mycetoma in domestic animals. Further investigation, including a TRH stimulation test, led to a diagnosis of PPID (Cushing's disease), which may have led to immunosuppression of the animal and increased susceptibility to infection.

Conclusions And Clinical Importance: The horse was treated medically with pergolide for the PPID and oral potassium iodide for the fungal infection, with good therapeutic response and no relapse after five months. Surgical debridement or excision was not performed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of a cutaneous mycetoma caused by A. terreus in a horse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/vde.12471DOI Listing
December 2017