Publications by authors named "Marion Döbler-Neumann"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bi-allelic HPDL Variants Cause a Neurodegenerative Disease Ranging from Neonatal Encephalopathy to Adolescent-Onset Spastic Paraplegia.

Am J Hum Genet 2020 08 23;107(2):364-373. Epub 2020 Jul 23.

Institute of Medical Genetics and Applied Genomics, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany; Centre for Rare Diseases, University of Tuebingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. Electronic address:

We report bi-allelic pathogenic HPDL variants as a cause of a progressive, pediatric-onset spastic movement disorder with variable clinical presentation. The single-exon gene HPDL encodes a protein of unknown function with sequence similarity to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase. Exome sequencing studies in 13 families revealed bi-allelic HPDL variants in each of the 17 individuals affected with this clinically heterogeneous autosomal-recessive neurological disorder. HPDL levels were significantly reduced in fibroblast cell lines derived from more severely affected individuals, indicating the identified HPDL variants resulted in the loss of HPDL protein. Clinical presentation ranged from severe, neonatal-onset neurodevelopmental delay with neuroimaging findings resembling mitochondrial encephalopathy to milder manifestation of adolescent-onset, isolated hereditary spastic paraplegia. All affected individuals developed spasticity predominantly of the lower limbs over the course of the disease. We demonstrated through bioinformatic and cellular studies that HPDL has a mitochondrial localization signal and consequently localizes to mitochondria suggesting a putative role in mitochondrial metabolism. Taken together, these genetic, bioinformatic, and functional studies demonstrate HPDL is a mitochondrial protein, the loss of which causes a clinically variable form of pediatric-onset spastic movement disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2020.06.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7413886PMC
August 2020

Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 11: Does the genetic defect determine timing of cerebellar pathology?

Eur J Med Genet 2020 Jul 28;63(7):103938. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

Institute of Medical Genetics and Applied Genomics, University of Tübingen, 72076, Tübingen, Germany; Centre for Rare Diseases, University of Tuebingen, 72076, Tübingen, Germany. Electronic address:

Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) comprises a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by hypoplasia and degeneration of the cerebellum and ventral pons. To date at least 18 different clinical subtypes of PCH associated with pathogenic variants in 19 different genes have been described. Only recently, bi-allelic variants in TBC1D23 have been reported as the underlying molecular defect in seven index cases with a suspected non-degenerative form of PCH, PCH type 11 (PCH11). We used exome sequencing to investigate an individual with global developmental delay, ataxia, seizures, and progressive PCH. Brain volume was evaluated over a disease course of 14 years using volumetric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Volume alterations were compared to age-matched controls as well as data from children with PCH2. We identified a homozygous frameshift variant in exon 9 of 18 of TBC1D23 predicting a loss of protein function. Brain morphometry revealed a pattern of pontine, brain stem, and supratentorial volume loss similar to PCH2 patients although less pronounced. Intriguingly, cerebral MRI findings at the age of 1 and 15 years clearly showed progressive atrophy of the cerebellum, especially the hemispheres. In four of the cases reported in the literature cerebellar hemispheres could be evaluated on the MRIs displayed, they also showed atrophic foliae. While pontine hypoplasia and pronounced microcephaly are in line with previous reports on PCH11, our observations of clearly postnatal atrophy of the cerebellum argues for a different pathomechanism than in the other forms of PCH and supports the hypothesis that TBC1D23 deficiency predominantly interferes with postnatal rather than with prenatal cerebellar development.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejmg.2020.103938DOI Listing
July 2020

Cerebellar lesions in pediatric abusive head trauma.

Eur J Paediatr Neurol 2019 Jul 17;23(4):604-608. Epub 2019 May 17.

University Children's Hospital (Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine), Tübingen, Germany.

Pediatric abusive head trauma (AHT) or non accidental head trauma (NAHT) is a major cause of death from trauma in children under 2 years of age. Main etiological factor for non accidental head trauma is shaking a baby, causing brain injury by rotational head acceleration and deceleration. The consequent brain damage as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is subdural haemorrhage and to a lesser extent parenchymal injuries of variable severity. Involvement of the cerebellum has very rarely been described. We report the clinical history and the development of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging findings in two children with serious brain injury following probable shaking who presented the typical "triad" with subdural haematoma, retinal haemorrhage and encephalopathy. We want to draw attention to cerebellar involvement characterized by cortico-subcortical signal alterations most prominent on T2w images following diffusion changes during the acute period. We discuss cerebellar involvement as a sign of higher severity of AHT which is probably underrecognized.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpn.2019.05.001DOI Listing
July 2019

FAHN/SPG35: a narrow phenotypic spectrum across disease classifications.

Brain 2019 06;142(6):1561-1572

Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Hertie-Institute for Clinical Brain Research, and Center for Neurology, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

The endoplasmic reticulum enzyme fatty acid 2-hydroxylase (FA2H) plays a major role in the formation of 2-hydroxy glycosphingolipids, main components of myelin. FA2H deficiency in mice leads to severe central demyelination and axon loss. In humans it has been associated with phenotypes from the neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (fatty acid hydroxylase-associated neurodegeneration, FAHN), hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP type SPG35) and leukodystrophy (leukodystrophy with spasticity and dystonia) spectrum. We performed an in-depth clinical and retrospective neurophysiological and imaging study in a cohort of 19 cases with biallelic FA2H mutations. FAHN/SPG35 manifests with early childhood onset predominantly lower limb spastic tetraparesis and truncal instability, dysarthria, dysphagia, cerebellar ataxia, and cognitive deficits, often accompanied by exotropia and movement disorders. The disease is rapidly progressive with loss of ambulation after a median of 7 years after disease onset and demonstrates little interindividual variability. The hair of FAHN/SPG35 patients shows a bristle-like appearance; scanning electron microscopy of patient hair shafts reveals deformities (longitudinal grooves) as well as plaque-like adhesions to the hair, likely caused by an abnormal sebum composition also described in a mouse model of FA2H deficiency. Characteristic imaging features of FAHN/SPG35 can be summarized by the 'WHAT' acronym: white matter changes, hypointensity of the globus pallidus, ponto-cerebellar atrophy, and thin corpus callosum. At least three of four imaging features are present in 85% of FA2H mutation carriers. Here, we report the first systematic, large cohort study in FAHN/SPG35 and determine the phenotypic spectrum, define the disease course and identify clinical and imaging biomarkers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/brain/awz102DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6536916PMC
June 2019

Uniparental disomy of chromosome 16 unmasks recessive mutations of FA2H/SPG35 in 4 families.

Neurology 2016 Jul 17;87(2):186-91. Epub 2016 Jun 17.

From the Institute of Medical Genetics and Applied Genomics (A.S.S., S.B.-W., K.S., O.R., P.B.) and Department of Neurology and Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research (T.W.R., R.S., L.S.), University of Tübingen; German Center of Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) (T.W.R., R.S.), Tübingen, Germany; Imprinting and Cancer Group (D.M.), Cancer Epigenetic and Biology Program, Institut d'Investigació Biomedica de Bellvitge, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Barcelona, Spain; Department of Neuropediatrics (M.D.-N.), Tübingen University School of Medicine; CeGaT GmbH (K.H.), Tübingen, Germany; Neurometabolic Diseases Laboratory (A.S., M.R., A.P.), Institut d'Investigació Biomedica de Bellvitge IDIBELL, Hospital Duran i Reynals, Barcelona; Centre for Biomedical Research on Rare Diseases (CIBERER) (A.S., M.R., A.P.), Institute Carlos III, Madrid; Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA) (A.P.), Barcelona, Spain; and Hussman Institute for Human Genomics (S.Z., R.S.), University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, FL.

Objective: Identifying an intriguing mechanism for unmasking recessive hereditary spastic paraplegias.

Method: Herein, we describe 4 novel homozygous FA2H mutations in 4 nonconsanguineous families detected by whole-exome sequencing or a targeted gene panel analysis providing high coverage of all known hereditary spastic paraplegia genes.

Results: Segregation analysis revealed in all cases only one parent as a heterozygous mutation carrier whereas the other parent did not carry FA2H mutations. A macro deletion within FA2H, which could have caused a hemizygous genotype, was excluded by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification in all cases. Finally, a microsatellite array revealed uniparental disomy (UPD) in all 4 families leading to homozygous FA2H mutations. UPD was confirmed by microarray analyses and methylation profiling.

Conclusion: UPD has rarely been described as causative mechanism in neurodegenerative diseases. Of note, we identified this mode of inheritance in 4 families with the rare diagnosis of spastic paraplegia type 35 (SPG35). Since UPD seems to be a relevant factor in SPG35 and probably additional autosomal recessive diseases, we recommend segregation analysis especially in nonconsanguineous homozygous index cases to unravel UPD as mutational mechanism. This finding may bear major repercussion for genetic counseling, given the markedly reduced risk of recurrence for affected families.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000002843DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4940069PMC
July 2016

Congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia: benign clinical course in a new genetic variant.

Childs Nerv Syst 2002 Feb 22;18(1-2):77-80. Epub 2001 Sep 22.

Department of Neuroradiology, University of Tübingen Medical School, Hoppe-Seyler-Strasse 3, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.

The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are autosomal recessive disorders of N-glycans processing. Several different subtypes have been identified in recent years. Cerebellar atrophy is a characteristic finding in subtype Ia. We report clinical, imaging and genetic findings in a patient with a particularly benign clinical course, who had a normal CT at the age of 9 months and a new, previously undescribed, combination of mutations of the PMM gene locus on chromosome 16p13 (647,691). The 691 mutation has been described only in severe cases so far. This could indicate that genotype-phenotype correlation is lower than expected.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s003810100493DOI Listing
February 2002