Publications by authors named "Mario Tanno"

5 Publications

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Erratum to: Drug-Induced Vanishing Bile Duct Syndrome: From Pathogenesis to Diagnosis and Therapeutics.

Semin Liver Dis 2021 Aug 29;41(3):e1. Epub 2021 Jun 29.

Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET-UNR), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Rosario, Argentina.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1732497DOI Listing
August 2021

Drug-Induced Vanishing Bile Duct Syndrome: From Pathogenesis to Diagnosis and Therapeutics.

Semin Liver Dis 2021 Aug 15;41(3):331-348. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET-UNR), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Rosario, Argentina.

The most concerned issue in the context of drug/herb-induced chronic cholestasis is vanishing bile duct syndrome. The progressive destruction of intrahepatic bile ducts leading to ductopenia is usually not dose dependent, and has a delayed onset that should be suspected when abnormal serum cholestasis enzyme levels persist despite drug withdrawal. Immune-mediated cholangiocyte injury, direct cholangiocyte damage by drugs or their metabolites once in bile, and sustained exposure to toxic bile salts when biliary epithelium protective defenses are impaired are the main mechanisms of cholangiolar damage. Current therapeutic alternatives are scarce and have not shown consistent beneficial effects so far. This review will summarize the current literature on the main diagnostic tools of ductopenia and its histological features, and the differential diagnostic with other ductopenic diseases. In addition, pathomechanisms will be addressed, as well as the connection between them and the supportive and curative strategies for ductopenia management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0041-1729972DOI Listing
August 2021

Argentinian clinical practice guideline for surveillance, diagnosis, staging and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

Ann Hepatol 2020 Sep - Oct;19(5):546-569. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Hospital Ramos Mejía, Ciudad de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The A.A.E.E.H has developed this guideline for the best care of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from Argentina. It was done from May 2018 to March 2020. Specific clinical research questions were systematically searched. The quality of evidence and level of recommendations were organized according to GRADE. HCC surveillance is strongly recommended with abdominal ultrasound (US) every six months in the population at risk for HCC (cirrhosis, hepatitis B or hepatitis C); it is suggested to add alpha-feto protein (AFP) levels in case of inexeperienced sonographers. Imaging diagnosis in patients at risk for HCC has high specificity and tumor biopsy is not mandatory. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer algorithm is strongly recommended for HCC staging and treatment-decision processes. Liver resection is strongly recommended for patients without portal hypertension and preserved liver function. Composite models are suggested for liver transplant selection criteria. Therapies for HCC with robust clinical evidence include transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and first to second line systemic treatment options (sorafenib, lenvatinib, regorafenib, cabozantinib and ramucirumab). Immunotherapy with nivolumab and pembrolizumab has failed to show statistical benefit but the novel combination of atezolizumab plus bevacizumab has recently shown survival benefit over sorafenib in frontline.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aohep.2020.06.003DOI Listing
June 2020

 Natural history of hepatitis C virus infection in a cohort of asymptomatic post-transfused subjects.

Ann Hepatol 2012 Sep-Oct;11(5):658-66

Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department, Hospital Provincial del Centenario, School of Medicine, University of Rosario, Argentina.

Unlabelled: BACKGROUND & AIMS. Studies about the natural history of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection report variable progression to cirrhosis depending on study design. Retrospective cross-sectional liver clinic studies overestimate the rate of fibrosis progression due to inclusion of patients with more severe disease leaving mild and asymptomatic patients underrepresented. We evaluated fibrosis progression in a group of "healthy" asymptomatic subjects, attending to a voluntary campaign for the detection of HCV infection.

Material And Methods: A detection campaign was launched on subjects transfused before 1993. Of 1699 volunteers, 61(3.6%) had HCV infection. A liver biopsy was performed in 40 (65%). Assessed risk factors for liver fibrosis were: sex, body mass index, alcohol consumption (> 20 g/d - > 40g/d ), genotype, HLA-DRB1 alleles, present age, age at infection and duration of infection.

Results: 25 (62.5%) were women with a median age of 52.5 years. The median duration of infection was 21.5 years with a median age at infection of 27 years. As regards fibrosis, 25 (62.5%) had a Low Stage (F0-F1), 8 patients, 20%, had severe fibrosis, one patient (2.5%) had cirrhosis. Alcohol consumption was the only risk factor associated with fibrosis progression.

Conclusions: The low progression to cirrhosis may be explained by the clinical characteristics of our population: asymptomatic middle-aged "healthy" subjects infected at young age. The progression to severe fibrosis was noticeable; hence a longer follow-up might demonstrate changes in this outcome. Significant alcohol consumption clearly worsens the natural history of HCV infection; this is no so evident for occasional or mild alcohol consumers.
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January 2013

Octreotide enhances portal pressure reduction induced by propranolol in cirrhosis: a randomized, controlled trial.

Am J Gastroenterol 2007 Oct 29;102(10):2206-13. Epub 2007 Jun 29.

Liver Unit and Hepatic Hemodynamic Laboratory, Sanatorio Parque, and Hospital Provincial del Centenario, Rosario, Argentina.

Background: In vitro, octreotide potentiates vasoconstriction in isolated, preconstricted, mesenteric arterial vessels. In cirrhotic patients, portal pressure (HVPG) reduction induced by propranolol is partly due to splanchnic vasoconstriction.

Aim: To evaluate HVPG effects of octreotide administration in cirrhotic patients receiving long-term propranolol.

Patients And Methods: A randomized, controlled trial. First study: a total of 28 patients were studied at baseline and 30 and 60 minutes after octreotide (200 mug) (N = 14) or placebo (N = 14) and then treated with propranolol for approximately 30 days (106 +/- 5 mg/day). Second study: after baseline evaluation patients received octreotide or placebo as they were assigned to in the first study and measurements repeated 30 and 60 minutes later.

Results: In the first study baseline HVPG was 18.7 +/- 0.9 mmHg and decreased to 17.1 +/- 1.1 mmHg and 17.1 +/- 1.0 mmHg (both P < 0.05 vs baseline) at 30 and 60 minutes after octreotide, respectively. Eight patients decreased their HVPG after octreotide. In the second study baseline HVPG was 15.6 +/- 1.3 mmHg (P < 0.01 vs baseline HVPG in first study) and decreased to 14.1 +/- 1.2 mmHg and 14.1 +/- 1.3 mmHg (25.7 +/- 5% lower than baseline HVPG in the first study, P < 0.01) (both P < 0.05 vs baseline) at 30 and 60 minutes after octreotide, respectively. Nine patients (2 responders/7 nonresponders to propranolol) decreased their HVPG after octreotide. Octreotide effects may be mediated by potentiation and additive mechanisms.

Conclusions: Octreotide enhances HVPG reduction induced by propranolol in cirrhotic patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1572-0241.2007.01390.xDOI Listing
October 2007
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