Publications by authors named "Marine I Murphree"

6 Publications

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Impact of integrated translational research on clinical exome sequencing.

Genet Med 2021 Mar 4;23(3):498-507. Epub 2020 Nov 4.

Center for Individualized Medicine, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Purpose: Exome sequencing often identifies pathogenic genetic variants in patients with undiagnosed diseases. Nevertheless, frequent findings of variants of uncertain significance necessitate additional efforts to establish causality before reaching a conclusive diagnosis. To provide comprehensive genomic testing to patients with undiagnosed disease, we established an Individualized Medicine Clinic, which offered clinical exome testing and included a Translational Omics Program (TOP) that provided variant curation, research activities, or research exome sequencing.

Methods: From 2012 to 2018, 1101 unselected patients with undiagnosed diseases received exome testing. Outcomes were reviewed to assess impact of the TOP and patient characteristics on diagnostic rates through descriptive and multivariate analyses.

Results: The overall diagnostic yield was 24.9% (274 of 1101 patients), with 174 (15.8% of 1101) diagnosed on the basis of clinical exome sequencing alone. Four hundred twenty-three patients with nondiagnostic or without access to clinical exome sequencing were evaluated by the TOP, with 100 (9% of 1101) patients receiving a diagnosis, accounting for 36.5% of the diagnostic yield. The identification of a genetic diagnosis was influenced by the age at time of testing and the disease phenotype of the patient.

Conclusion: Integration of translational research activities into clinical practice of a tertiary medical center can significantly increase the diagnostic yield of patients with undiagnosed disease.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41436-020-01005-9DOI Listing
March 2021

Missense Variants in the Histone Acetyltransferase Complex Component Gene TRRAP Cause Autism and Syndromic Intellectual Disability.

Authors:
Benjamin Cogné Sophie Ehresmann Eliane Beauregard-Lacroix Justine Rousseau Thomas Besnard Thomas Garcia Slavé Petrovski Shiri Avni Kirsty McWalter Patrick R Blackburn Stephan J Sanders Kévin Uguen Jacqueline Harris Julie S Cohen Moira Blyth Anna Lehman Jonathan Berg Mindy H Li Usha Kini Shelagh Joss Charlotte von der Lippe Christopher T Gordon Jennifer B Humberson Laurie Robak Daryl A Scott Vernon R Sutton Cara M Skraban Jennifer J Johnston Annapurna Poduri Magnus Nordenskjöld Vandana Shashi Erica H Gerkes Ernie M H F Bongers Christian Gilissen Yuri A Zarate Malin Kvarnung Kevin P Lally Peggy A Kulch Brina Daniels Andres Hernandez-Garcia Nicholas Stong Julie McGaughran Kyle Retterer Kristian Tveten Jennifer Sullivan Madeleine R Geisheker Asbjorg Stray-Pedersen Jennifer M Tarpinian Eric W Klee Julie C Sapp Jacob Zyskind Øystein L Holla Emma Bedoukian Francesca Filippini Anne Guimier Arnaud Picard Øyvind L Busk Jaya Punetha Rolph Pfundt Anna Lindstrand Ann Nordgren Fayth Kalb Megha Desai Ashley Harmon Ebanks Shalini N Jhangiani Tammie Dewan Zeynep H Coban Akdemir Aida Telegrafi Elaine H Zackai Amber Begtrup Xiaofei Song Annick Toutain Ingrid M Wentzensen Sylvie Odent Dominique Bonneau Xénia Latypova Wallid Deb Sylvia Redon Frédéric Bilan Marine Legendre Caitlin Troyer Kerri Whitlock Oana Caluseriu Marine I Murphree Pavel N Pichurin Katherine Agre Ralitza Gavrilova Tuula Rinne Meredith Park Catherine Shain Erin L Heinzen Rui Xiao Jeanne Amiel Stanislas Lyonnet Bertrand Isidor Leslie G Biesecker Dan Lowenstein Jennifer E Posey Anne-Sophie Denommé-Pichon Claude Férec Xiang-Jiao Yang Jill A Rosenfeld Brigitte Gilbert-Dussardier Séverine Audebert-Bellanger Richard Redon Holly A F Stessman Christoffer Nellaker Yaping Yang James R Lupski David B Goldstein Evan E Eichler Francois Bolduc Stéphane Bézieau Sébastien Küry Philippe M Campeau

Am J Hum Genet 2019 03 28;104(3):530-541. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Sainte-Justine Research Centre, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T 1C5, Canada; Department of Pediatrics, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC H3T1J4, Canada. Electronic address:

Acetylation of the lysine residues in histones and other DNA-binding proteins plays a major role in regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. This process is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs/KATs) found in multiprotein complexes that are recruited to chromatin by the scaffolding subunit transformation/transcription domain-associated protein (TRRAP). TRRAP is evolutionarily conserved and is among the top five genes intolerant to missense variation. Through an international collaboration, 17 distinct de novo or apparently de novo variants were identified in TRRAP in 24 individuals. A strong genotype-phenotype correlation was observed with two distinct clinical spectra. The first is a complex, multi-systemic syndrome associated with various malformations of the brain, heart, kidneys, and genitourinary system and characterized by a wide range of intellectual functioning; a number of affected individuals have intellectual disability (ID) and markedly impaired basic life functions. Individuals with this phenotype had missense variants clustering around the c.3127G>A p.(Ala1043Thr) variant identified in five individuals. The second spectrum manifested with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and/or ID and epilepsy. Facial dysmorphism was seen in both groups and included upslanted palpebral fissures, epicanthus, telecanthus, a wide nasal bridge and ridge, a broad and smooth philtrum, and a thin upper lip. RNA sequencing analysis of skin fibroblasts derived from affected individuals skin fibroblasts showed significant changes in the expression of several genes implicated in neuronal function and ion transport. Thus, we describe here the clinical spectrum associated with TRRAP pathogenic missense variants, and we suggest a genotype-phenotype correlation useful for clinical evaluation of the pathogenicity of the variants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajhg.2019.01.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407527PMC
March 2019

Extension of the mutational and clinical spectrum of SOX2 related disorders: Description of six new cases and a novel association with suprasellar teratoma.

Am J Med Genet A 2018 12 18;176(12):2710-2719. Epub 2018 Nov 18.

Department of Genetics, Institute of Ophthalmology "Conde de Valenciana", Mexico City, Mexico.

SOX2 is a transcription factor that is essential for maintenance of pluripotency and has several conserved roles in early embryonic development. Heterozygous loss-of-function variants in SOX2 are identified in approximately 40% of all cases of bilateral anophthalmia/micropthalmia (A/M). Increasingly SOX2 mutation-positive patients without major eye findings, but with a range of other developmental disorders including autism, mild to moderate intellectual disability with or without structural brain changes, esophageal atresia, urogenital anomalies, and endocrinopathy are being reported, suggesting that the clinical phenotype associated with SOX2 loss is much broader than previously appreciated. In this report we describe six new cases, four of which carry novel pathogenic SOX2 variants. Four cases presented with bilateral anophthalmia in addition to extraocular involvement. Another individual presented with only unilateral anophthalmia. One individual did not have any eye findings but presented with a suprasellar teratoma in infancy and was found to have the recurrent c.70del20 mutation in SOX2 (c.70_89del, p.Asn24Argfs*65). This is this first time this tumor type has been reported in the context of a de novo SOX2 mutation. Notably, individuals with hypothalamic hamartomas and slow-growing hypothalamo-pituitary tumors have been reported previously, but it is still unclear how SOX2 loss contributes to their formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.40644DOI Listing
December 2018

Utility of DNA, RNA, Protein, and Functional Approaches to Solve Cryptic Immunodeficiencies.

J Clin Immunol 2018 04 18;38(3):307-319. Epub 2018 Apr 18.

Center for Individualized Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.

Purpose: We report a female infant identified by newborn screening for severe combined immunodeficiencies (NBS SCID) with T cell lymphopenia (TCL). The patient had persistently elevated alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) with IgA deficiency, and elevated IgM. Gene sequencing for a SCID panel was uninformative. We sought to determine the cause of the immunodeficiency in this infant.

Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) on the patient and parents to identify a genetic diagnosis. Based on the WES result, we developed a novel flow cytometric panel for rapid assessment of DNA repair defects using blood samples. We also performed whole transcriptome sequencing (WTS) on fibroblast RNA from the patient and father for abnormal transcript analysis.

Results: WES revealed a pathogenic paternally inherited indel in ATM. We used the flow panel to assess several proteins in the DNA repair pathway in lymphocyte subsets. The patient had absent phosphorylation of ATM, resulting in absent or aberrant phosphorylation of downstream proteins, including γH2AX. However, ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) is an autosomal recessive condition, and the abnormal functional data did not correspond with a single ATM variant. WTS revealed in-frame reciprocal fusion transcripts involving ATM and SLC35F2 indicating a chromosome 11 inversion within 11q22.3, of maternal origin. Inversion breakpoints were identified within ATM intron 16 and SLC35F2 intron 7.

Conclusions: We identified a novel ATM-breaking chromosome 11 inversion in trans with a pathogenic indel (compound heterozygote) resulting in non-functional ATM protein, consistent with a diagnosis of AT. Utilization of several molecular and functional assays allowed successful resolution of this case.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10875-018-0499-6DOI Listing
April 2018

De novo 11q deletion including SHANK2 in a patient with global developmental delay.

Am J Med Genet A 2017 03;173(3):801-805

Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.a.38075DOI Listing
March 2017

A novel GBE1 gene variant in a child with glycogen storage disease type IV.

Hum Pathol 2016 08 20;54:152-6. Epub 2016 Apr 20.

Division of Anatomic Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United states, 55905.

Glycogen storage disease type IV is an autosomal recessive disorder of carbohydrates caused by deficiency of amylo-1-4-glycanoglycosyltransferase, which leads to accumulation of amylopectin-like polysaccharides in tissues including liver, heart and neuromuscular system. More than 40 different mutations in the glycogen branching enzyme gene (GBE1) have been described. In this study, we report a 2-year-old boy who presented with developmental delay and muscle weakness. He subsequently was diagnosed with glycogen storage disease type IV based on a liver biopsy histology and electron microscopy. Glycogen branching enzyme activity was in the low range. Genetic analysis demonstrated a novel heterozygous variant (c.760A>G; p.Thr254Ala) in exon 6 of the GBE1 gene, which is believed to be pathogenic. This variant was inherited from the patient's mother who was asymptomatic with normal glycogen branching enzyme activity. Whole-exome sequencing failed to reveal additional variations in the GBE1 gene.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.humpath.2016.03.021DOI Listing
August 2016