Publications by authors named "Marina Krause"

9 Publications

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Cell migration through three-dimensional confining pores: speed accelerations by deformation and recoil of the nucleus.

Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 2019 08 1;374(1779):20180225. Epub 2019 Jul 1.

Department of Cell Biology, Radboud University Medical Center, 6525 GA Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Directional cell migration in dense three-dimensional (3D) environments critically depends upon shape adaptation and is impeded depending on the size and rigidity of the nucleus. Accordingly, the nucleus is primarily understood as a physical obstacle; however, its pro-migratory functions by stepwise deformation and reshaping remain unclear. Using atomic force spectroscopy, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and shape change analysis tools, we determined the nuclear size, deformability, morphology and shape change of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells expressing the Fucci cell cycle indicator or being pre-treated with chromatin-decondensating agent TSA. We show oscillating peak accelerations during migration through 3D collagen matrices and microdevices that occur during shape reversion of deformed nuclei (recoil), and increase with confinement. During G1 cell-cycle phase, nucleus stiffness was increased and yielded further increased speed fluctuations together with sustained cell migration rates in confinement when compared to interphase populations or to periods of intrinsic nuclear softening in the S/G2 cell-cycle phase. Likewise, nuclear softening by pharmacological chromatin decondensation or after lamin A/C depletion reduced peak oscillations in confinement. In conclusion, deformation and recoil of the stiff nucleus contributes to saltatory locomotion in dense tissues. This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'Forces in cancer: interdisciplinary approaches in tumour mechanobiology'.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2018.0225DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6627020PMC
August 2019

Cancer cell migration in 3D tissue: negotiating space by proteolysis and nuclear deformability.

Cell Adh Migr 2015 24;9(5):357-66. Epub 2015 Aug 24.

a Department of Cell Biology ; Radboud University Medical Center ; Nijmegen , The Netherlands.

Efficient tumor cell invasion into the surrounding desmoplastic stroma is a hallmark of cancer progression and involves the navigation through available small tissue spaces existent within the dense stromal network. Such navigation includes the reciprocal adaptation of the moving tumor cell, including the nucleus as largest and stiffest organelle, to pre-existent or de-novo generated extracellular matrix (ECM) gaps, pores and trails within stromal compartments. Within the context of migration, we briefly summarize physiological and tumor-related changes in ECM geometries as well as tissue proteolysis. We then focus on mechanisms that ensure the successful translocation of a nucleus through a confining pore by cytoskeleton-mediated coupling, as well as regulators of cell and nuclear deformability such as chromatin organization and nuclear lamina expression. In summary, understanding dynamic nuclear mechanics during migration in response to confined space will add to a better conceptual appreciation of cancer invasion and progression.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/19336918.2015.1061173DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4955366PMC
August 2016

Cell jamming: collective invasion of mesenchymal tumor cells imposed by tissue confinement.

Biochim Biophys Acta 2014 Aug 8;1840(8):2386-95. Epub 2014 Apr 8.

Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Department of Cell Biology, Post 283, PO Box 9101, 6500HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands; UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Genitourinary Medical Oncology-Research, Houston TX, USA; Cancer Genomics Center, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Background: Cancer invasion is a multi-step process which coordinates interactions between tumor cells with mechanotransduction towards the surrounding matrix, resulting in distinct cancer invasion strategies. Defined by context, mesenchymal tumors, including melanoma and fibrosarcoma, develop either single-cell or collective invasion modes, however, the mechanical and molecular programs underlying such plasticity of mesenchymal invasion programs remain unclear.

Methods: To test how tissue anatomy determines invasion mode, spheroids of MV3 melanoma and HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells were embedded into 3D collagen matrices of varying density and stiffness and analyzed for migration type and efficacy with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-dependent collagen degradation enabled or pharmacologically inhibited.

Results: With increasing collagen density and dependent on proteolytic collagen breakdown and track clearance, but independent of matrix stiffness, cells switched from single-cell to collective invasion modes. Conversion to collective invasion included gain of cell-to-cell junctions, supracellular polarization and joint guidance along migration tracks.

Conclusions: The density of the extracellulair matrix (ECM) determines the invasion mode of mesenchymal tumor cells. Whereas fibrillar, high porosity ECM enables single-cell dissemination, dense matrix induces cell-cell interaction, leader-follower cell behavior and collective migration as an obligate protease-dependent process.

General Significance: These findings establish plasticity of cancer invasion programs in response to ECM porosity and confinement, thereby recapitulating invasion patterns of mesenchymal tumors in vivo. The conversion to collective invasion with increasing ECM confinement supports the concept of cell jamming as a guiding principle for melanoma and fibrosarcoma cells into dense tissue. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Matrix-mediated cell behaviour and properties.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbagen.2014.03.020DOI Listing
August 2014

Probing the compressibility of tumor cell nuclei by combined atomic force-confocal microscopy.

Phys Biol 2013 Dec 4;10(6):065002. Epub 2013 Dec 4.

Department of Cell Biology, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The cell nucleus is the largest and stiffest organelle rendering it the limiting compartment during migration of invasive tumor cells through dense connective tissue. We here describe a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM)-confocal microscopy approach for measurement of bulk nuclear stiffness together with simultaneous visualization of the cantilever-nucleus contact and the fate of the cell. Using cantilevers functionalized with either tips or beads and spring constants ranging from 0.06-10 N m(-1), force-deformation curves were generated from nuclear positions of adherent HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell populations at unchallenged integrity, and a nuclear stiffness range of 0.2 to 2.5 kPa was identified depending on cantilever type and the use of extended fitting models. Chromatin-decondensating agent trichostatin A (TSA) induced nuclear softening of up to 50%, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. Finally, using a stiff bead-functionalized cantilever pushing at maximal system-intrinsic force, the nucleus was deformed to 20% of its original height which after TSA treatment reduced further to 5% remaining height confirming chromatin organization as an important determinant of nuclear stiffness. Thus, combined AFM-confocal microscopy is a feasible approach to study nuclear compressibility to complement concepts of limiting nuclear deformation in cancer cell invasion and other biological processes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1478-3975/10/6/065002DOI Listing
December 2013

Physical limits of cell migration: control by ECM space and nuclear deformation and tuning by proteolysis and traction force.

J Cell Biol 2013 Jun;201(7):1069-84

Department of Cell Biology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, 6500 HB Nijmegen, Netherlands.

Cell migration through 3D tissue depends on a physicochemical balance between cell deformability and physical tissue constraints. Migration rates are further governed by the capacity to degrade ECM by proteolytic enzymes, particularly matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and integrin- and actomyosin-mediated mechanocoupling. Yet, how these parameters cooperate when space is confined remains unclear. Using MMP-degradable collagen lattices or nondegradable substrates of varying porosity, we quantitatively identify the limits of cell migration by physical arrest. MMP-independent migration declined as linear function of pore size and with deformation of the nucleus, with arrest reached at 10% of the nuclear cross section (tumor cells, 7 µm²; T cells, 4 µm²; neutrophils, 2 µm²). Residual migration under space restriction strongly depended upon MMP-dependent ECM cleavage by enlarging matrix pore diameters, and integrin- and actomyosin-dependent force generation, which jointly propelled the nucleus. The limits of interstitial cell migration thus depend upon scaffold porosity and deformation of the nucleus, with pericellular collagenolysis and mechanocoupling as modulators.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201210152DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3691458PMC
June 2013

The "DGPPN-Cohort": A national collaboration initiative by the German Association for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (DGPPN) for establishing a large-scale cohort of psychiatric patients.

Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci 2013 Dec 3;263(8):695-701. Epub 2013 Apr 3.

Section of Psychiatric Genetics, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Medical Centre Göttingen, Von-Siebold-Str. 5, 37075, Göttingen, Germany.

The German Association for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy (DGPPN) has committed itself to establish a prospective national cohort of patients with major psychiatric disorders, the so-called DGPPN-Cohort. This project will enable the scientific exploitation of high-quality data and biomaterial from psychiatric patients for research. It will be set up using harmonised data sets and procedures for sample generation and guided by transparent rules for data access and data sharing regarding the central research database. While the main focus lies on biological research, it will be open to all kinds of scientific investigations, including epidemiological, clinical or health-service research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00406-013-0401-8DOI Listing
December 2013

Analyzing the homeostasis of signaling proteins by a combination of Western blot and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

Biophys J 2011 Dec;101(11):2807-15

Department of Biochemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

The determination of intracellular protein concentrations is a prerequisite for understanding protein interaction networks in systems biology. Today, protein quantification is based either on mass spectrometry, which requires large cell numbers and sophisticated measurement protocols, or on quantitative Western blotting, which requires the expression and purification of a recombinant protein as a reference. Here, we present a method that uses a transiently expressed fluorescent fusion protein of the protein-of-interest as an easily accessible reference in small volumes of crude cell lysates. The concentration of the fusion protein is determined by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and this concentration is used to calibrate the intensity of bands on a Western blot. We applied this method to address cellular protein homeostasis by determining the concentrations of the plasma membrane-located transmembrane scaffolding protein LAT and soluble signaling proteins in naïve T cells and transformed T-cell lymphoma (Jurkat) cells (with the latter having nine times the volume of the former). Strikingly, the protein numbers of soluble proteins scaled with the cell volume, whereas that of the transmembrane protein LAT scaled with the membrane surface. This leads to significantly different stoichiometries of signaling proteins in transformed and naïve cells in concentration ranges that may translate directly into differences in complex formation.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bpj.2011.09.058DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3297796PMC
December 2011

Cytotoxic T lymphocyte migration and effector function in the tumor microenvironment.

Immunol Lett 2011 Jul 17;138(1):19-21. Epub 2011 Feb 17.

Microscopical Imaging of the Cell, Nijmegen Center for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Immunological control of cancer lesions requires local uptake of tumor-specific antigen followed by the activation and expansion of tumor specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL). An efficient effector phase further depends upon the entry of activated CTL into the tumor microenvironment and scanning of tumor tissue, which leads to direct interaction of the CTL with target cells followed by apoptosis induction and shrinkage of the tumor lesion. Whereas the antigens and pathways that lead to efficient activation of tumor-specific CTL are well established, the local mechanisms that enable efficient - or deficient - CTL function in the tumor tissue are poorly understood. Firstly, effector T lymphocytes need to be mobile to reach the tumor lesion. Next, they must physically interact with and scan tumor cells for antigenic MHC/peptide complexes. Lastly, CTLs must undergo activation and functional conjugation with target cells to induce apoptosis either by the release of perforins or the engagement of Fas/FasL. All these steps of effector function are interdependent and require the amoeboid migration of CTL through tissue to reach, engage with and leave encountered cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.imlet.2011.02.016DOI Listing
July 2011
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