Publications by authors named "Marina Caldarelli"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

5-(2-amino-pyrimidin-4-yl)-1H-pyrrole and 2-(2-amino-pyrimidin-4-yl)-1,5,6,7-tetrahydro-pyrrolo[3,2-c]pyridin-4-one derivatives as new classes of selective and orally available Polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2012 Jan 23;22(1):96-101. Epub 2011 Nov 23.

Nerviano Medical Sciences srl, Business Unit Oncology, Viale Pasteur 10, 20014 Nerviano, (MI), Italy.

The discovery and characterization of two new chemical classes of potent and selective Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitors is reported. For the most interesting compounds, we discuss the biological activities, crystal structures and preliminary pharmacokinetic parameters. The more advanced compounds inhibit PLK1 in the enzymatic assay at the nM level and exhibit good activity in cell proliferation on A2780 cells. Furthermore, these compounds showed high levels of selectivity on a panel of unrelated kinases, as well as against PLK2 and PLK3 isoforms. Additionally, the compounds show acceptable oral bioavailability in mice making these inhibitors suitable candidates for further in vivo activity studies.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2011.11.065DOI Listing
January 2012

Synthesis and SAR of new pyrazolo[4,3-h]quinazoline-3-carboxamide derivatives as potent and selective MPS1 kinase inhibitors.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2011 Aug 14;21(15):4507-11. Epub 2011 Jun 14.

Nerviano Medical Sciences srl, Business Unit Oncology, Nerviano, MI, Italy.

The synthesis and SAR of a series of novel pyrazolo-quinazolines as potent and selective MPS1 inhibitors are reported. We describe the optimization of the initial hit, identified by screening the internal library collection, into an orally available, potent and selective MPS1 inhibitor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2011.05.122DOI Listing
August 2011

Targeting the mitotic checkpoint for cancer therapy with NMS-P715, an inhibitor of MPS1 kinase.

Cancer Res 2010 Dec;70(24):10255-64

Department of Cell Biology-Oncology, Nerviano Medical Sciences, Viale Pasteur 10, Nerviano 20014, Italy.

MPS1 kinase is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a mitotic mechanism specifically required for proper chromosomal alignment and segregation. It has been found aberrantly overexpressed in a wide range of human tumors and is necessary for tumoral cell proliferation. Here we report the identification and characterization of NMS-P715, a selective and orally bioavailable MPS1 small-molecule inhibitor, which selectively reduces cancer cell proliferation, leaving normal cells almost unaffected. NMS-P715 accelerates mitosis and affects kinetochore components localization causing massive aneuploidy and cell death in a variety of tumoral cell lines and inhibits tumor growth in preclinical cancer models. Inhibiting the SAC could represent a promising new approach to selectively target cancer cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-2101DOI Listing
December 2010

Cdc7 kinase inhibitors: 5-heteroaryl-3-carboxamido-2-aryl pyrroles as potential antitumor agents. 1. Lead finding.

J Med Chem 2010 Oct;53(20):7296-315

Nerviano Medical Sciences Srl, Business Unit Oncology, Viale Pasteur 10, 20014 Nerviano, MI, Italy.

Cdc7 serine/threonine kinase is a key regulator of DNA synthesis in eukaryotic organisms. Cdc7 inhibition through siRNA or prototype small molecules causes p53 independent apoptosis in tumor cells while reversibly arresting cell cycle progression in primary fibroblasts. This implies that Cdc7 kinase could be considered a potential target for anticancer therapy. We previously reported that pyrrolopyridinones (e.g., 1) are potent and selective inhibitors of Cdc7 kinase, with good cellular potency and in vitro ADME properties but with suboptimal pharmacokinetic profiles. Here we report on a new chemical class of 5-heteroaryl-3-carboxamido-2-substituted pyrroles (1A) that offers advantages of chemistry diversification and synthetic simplification. This work led to the identification of compound 18, with biochemical data and ADME profile similar to those of compound 1 but characterized by superior efficacy in an in vivo model. Derivative 18 represents a new lead compound worthy of further investigation toward the ultimate goal of identifying a clinical candidate.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm100504dDOI Listing
October 2010

Cytotoxic alpha-halogenoacrylic derivatives of distamycin A and congeners.

J Med Chem 2004 May;47(10):2611-23

Pharmacia Italia S.p.A., Discovery Research Oncology, Viale Pasteur 10, 20014 Nerviano, Milan, Italy.

The mechanism of action of many antitumor agents involves DNA damage, either by direct binding of the drug to DNA or to DNA-binding proteins. However, most of the DNA-interacting agents have only a limited degree of sequence specificity, which implies that they may hit all the cellular genes. DNA minor groove binders, among which the derivatives of distamycin A play an important role, could provide significant improvement in cancer management, increasing gene specificity, due to high selectivity of interaction with thymine-adenine (TA) rich sequences. We now report and discuss the synthesis, the in vitro and in vivo activities, and some mechanistic features of alpha-halogenoacrylamido derivatives of distamycin A. The final result of this work was the selection of brostallicin 17 (PNU-166196). Brostallicin, presently in phase II clinical trials, shows a broad spectrum of antitumor activity and an apoptotic effect higher than distamycin derivative tallimustine. An important in vitro toxicological feature of brostallicin is the very good ratio between myelotoxicity on human haematopoietic progenitor cells and cytotoxicity on tumor cells, in comparison with clinically tested DNA minor groove binders. A peculiarity of brostallicin is its in vitro reactivity in the DNA alkylation assays only in the presence of glutathione. Moreover brostallicin's antitumor activity, both in in vitro and in vivo tumor models, is higher in the presence of increased levels of glutathione/glutathione-S-tranferases. These findings contribute to the definition of brostallicin as a novel anticancer agent that differs from other minor groove binders and alkylating agents for both the profile of activity and the mechanism of action and to classify the alpha-bromoacrylamido derivatives of distamycin as a new class of cytotoxics. Moreover, due to its interaction with glutathione, brostallicin may have a role for the tailored treatment of tumors characterized by constitutive or therapy-induced overexpression of glutathione/glutathione-S-tranferase levels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm031051kDOI Listing
May 2004

Cytotoxic alpha-bromoacrylic derivatives of low molecular weight.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2002 Jun;12(11):1467-71

Chemistry Department, Pharmacia Discovery Research Oncology, Viale Pasteur 10, 20014 Nerviano, Milan, Italy.

In vitro and in vivo activities of a small series of alpha-bromoacrylic derivatives of low molecular weight (MW) are described and compared with those of alpha-bromoacrylic derivatives of distamycin-like frames. Low MW compounds, when lacking of a strong basic moiety, are potent cytotoxics, while analogues bearing a strong basic moiety are not. This suggests the existence of an active transport mechanism for distamycin-derived cytotoxics characterized by strong basic amidino or guanidino moieties. Low MW compounds are inactive in vivo, possibly because of the metabolic lability of alpha-bromoacrylic moiety. The same moiety is however present in a series of potent anticancer distamycin-like minor groove binders, for example, PNU-166196 (brostallicin), a fact that underlines the features of the latter.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/s0960-894x(02)00177-4DOI Listing
June 2002