Publications by authors named "Mariela R Escobar"

2 Publications

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Mitochondrial Small Heat Shock Proteins Are Essential for Normal Growth of .

Front Plant Sci 2021 10;12:600426. Epub 2021 Feb 10.

Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR-CONICET-UNR), Rosario, Argentina.

Mitochondria play important roles in the plant stress responses and the detoxification of the reactive oxygen species generated in the electron transport chain. Expression of genes encoding stress-related proteins such as the mitochondrial small heat shock proteins (M-sHSP) is upregulated in response to different abiotic stresses. In , three paralogous genes were identified, although their function under physiological conditions remains elusive. The aim of this work is to uncover the function of all three at the whole plant level. To accomplish this goal, we analyzed the phenotype, proteomic, and metabolic profiles of Arabidopsis knock-down lines of (single, double, and triple knock-down lines) during normal plant growth. The triple knock-down plants showed the most prominent altered phenotype at vegetative and reproductive stages without any externally applied stress. They displayed chlorotic leaves, growth arrest, and low seed production. Concomitantly, they exhibited increased levels of sugars, proline, and citric, malic, and ascorbic acid, among other metabolites. In contrast, single and double knock-down plants displayed a few changes in their phenotype. A redundant function among the three M-sHSPs is indicated by the impairment in vegetative and reproductive growth associated with the simultaneous loss of all three genes. The triple knock-down lines showed alteration of proteins mainly involved in photosynthesis and antioxidant defense compared to the control plants. On the other hand, heat stress triggered a distinct cytosolic response pattern and the upregulation of other sHSP members, in the knock-down plants. Overall, depletion of all three M-sHSPs in Arabidopsis severely impacted fundamental metabolic processes, leading to alterations in the correct plant growth and development. These findings expand our knowledge about the contribution of organelle-specific M-sHSPs to healthy plant growth under non-stress conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpls.2021.600426DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7902927PMC
February 2021

Small heat shock proteins and the postharvest chilling tolerance of tomato fruit.

Physiol Plant 2017 Feb 16;159(2):148-160. Epub 2016 Sep 16.

Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR-CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Rosario, Argentina.

Plants have the largest number of small heat shock proteins (sHsps) (15-42 kDa) among eukaryotes, but little is known about their function in vivo. They accumulate in response to different stresses, and specific sHsps are also expressed during developmental processes such as seed development, germination, and ripening. The presence of organelle-specific sHsps appears to be unique to plants. The sHsps expression is regulated by heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs). In this work, it was explored the role of sHsps in the chilling injury of tomato fruit. The level of transcripts and proteins of cytoplasmic and organellar sHsps was monitored in fruit during ripening and after cold storage (4 weeks at 4°C). Expression of HsfA1, HsfA2, HsfA3, and HsfB1 was also examined. Two cultivars of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) contrasting in chilling tolerance were assayed: Micro-Tom (chilling-tolerant) and Minitomato (chilling-sensitive). Results showed that sHsps were induced during ripening in fruit from both cultivars. However, sHsps were induced in Micro-Tom fruit but not in Minitomato fruit after storage at a low temperature. In particular, sHsp 17.4-CII and sHsp23.8-M transcripts strongly accumulated in Micro-Tom fruit and HsfA3 transcript diminished after cold storage. These data suggest that sHsps may be involved in the protection mechanisms against chilling stress and substantiate the hypothesis that sHsps may participate in the mechanism of tomato genotype chilling tolerance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ppl.12491DOI Listing
February 2017