Publications by authors named "Mariel Benjamin"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Evaluating the Keystones of Development - An Online Curriculum for Residents to Promote Positive Parenting in Primary Care.

Acad Pediatr 2021 Jun 12. Epub 2021 Jun 12.

Mount Sinai Parenting Center, 207 East 94th Street, 2nd Floor New York, NY 10128. USA; Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1 Gustave Levy Place, Box 1198, New York, NY 10029. USA. Electronic address:

Objective: This pilot outcome evaluation assesses the effectiveness of an online curriculum, the Keystones of Development, aimed at improving residents' knowledge, attitudes, and reported behaviors around promoting positive parenting and childhood development in well-child visits.

Methods: We used an explanatory mixed-methods approach, including a single-arm pre-posttest of intervention effects on self-reported behavioral outcomes (discussing, modeling, and praising) and secondary outcomes (knowledge, perceived barriers, attitudes, and self-efficacy). Following this, a subset of residents participated in in-depth interviews to describe participant responses to the intervention.

Results: The study was conducted at 8 pediatric residency programs across the United States with 67 pediatric residents (mean age=29; 79% female; 57% PGY1). Within one month post-intervention, there was a statistically significant increase in the behaviors that promote positive parenting: discussing (p<0.01;d=0.73) and modeling (p<0.01;d=0.61) but not praising (p=0.05; d=0.3). Significant changes in the secondary outcomes: knowledge (p<0.01), perceived barriers, (p<0.01), and retrospective self-efficacy (p<0.01) were seen. Interviews revealed that integration of curriculum content into clinical practice was due to the relevance of the material to primary care and the modeling of how to apply in the clinical setting. Curriculum format, content, and clinical application helped participants weave recommendations into the well-child visit.

Conclusion: In this study, we demonstrated that the online curriculum, Keystones of Development, increased resident behaviors, knowledge, and self-efficacy, and decreased perceived barriers to promote parenting behaviors associated with improved child development outcomes in well-child visits. These findings were observed across participants demonstrating equal success regardless of demographic characteristics or study site.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2021.06.005DOI Listing
June 2021

Prevalence of Bronchiectasis in Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis in a Tertiary Care Center.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2021 May 22. Epub 2021 May 22.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Ill.

Background: Whereas chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is associated with asthma, and vice versa, the association between CRS and other lower respiratory conditions is not well-established. Bronchiectasis is characterized by permanent damage of the airways, and as many as 45% of bronchiectasis patients have CRS, but the prevalence of bronchiectasis among CRS patients is not known.

Objective: To determine the prevalence of bronchiectasis among CRS patients and to characterize demographic and clinical features of patients with bronchiectasis and CRS.

Methods: Electronic medical records of patients with rhinosinusitis were searched by computer algorithm supplemented with manual chart review to identify patients with CRS, asthma, and/or bronchiectasis. Demographic and clinical features and antibiotic courses for sinopulmonary infections 2 years before and after sinus surgery were obtained by manual chart review.

Results: The prevalence of bronchiectasis as determined by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code was significantly higher in CRS patients than in asthmatic patients (2.3% vs 1.7%; P < .003). Similarly, based on a text word search of "bronchiectasis" in the chest computed tomography (CT) scan reports, patients with CRS who had chest CT scans had a higher prevalence of bronchiectasis than did asthmatic patients with chest CT scans (24.3% vs 19.5%; P = .005). Patients with CRS and concurrent bronchiectasis did not have a reduction in the frequency of sinopulmonary infections after sinus surgery compared with patients with CRS without bronchiectasis (P < .05).

Conclusions: Bronchiectasis is an important comorbidity in patients with CRS and may identify a severe phenotype of chronic sinonasal disease.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2021.04.054DOI Listing
May 2021

Educating Pediatric Residents About Parenting: A Survey of Residency Program Leaders.

Clin Pediatr (Phila) 2020 06 28;59(7):699-705. Epub 2020 Feb 28.

Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

The American Academic of Pediatrics guides pediatricians to counsel parents about how to promote their children's cognitive, emotional, and self-regulatory development, but the extent to which pediatricians receive the training needed to do so is unknown. An online survey was distributed to members of the Association of Pediatric Program Directors. Although most respondents agreed that it was "very important" to educate residents about parenting skills, only 11% rated their program as doing so "very well." The most frequently reported reason for not doing very well was lack of a curriculum. Residents currently learn about parenting most commonly in continuity clinic talks, are educated via lectures, and are taught most frequently by clinic preceptors. Nearly half of the respondents reported that their residents relied on self-learning about parenting behaviors. When asked which topics respondents would like covered by an evidence-based parenting curriculum, the most commonly endorsed topic was positive discipline.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0009922820908584DOI Listing
June 2020

Update in Rhinology and Allergy.

Am J Rhinol Allergy 2019 Sep;33(5):459-461

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1945892419870617DOI Listing
September 2019

Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Chronic Rhinosinusitis without Nasal Polyps in an Academic Setting.

J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract 2019 03 25;7(3):1010-1016. Epub 2018 Oct 25.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Ill; Department of Otolaryngology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Ill. Electronic address:

Background: Although patients with chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (CRSsNP) represent a majority of the chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) population, they have not been completely characterized phenotypically.

Objective: To perform a comprehensive phenotypic characterization of subjects with CRSsNP, using CRS with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) as a comparator.

Methods: Patients with a history of CRS with positive sinus computed tomography (>18 years old) evaluated in the allergy/immunology or otolaryngology clinics of an academic center between 2002 and 2012 were identified via International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes. A retrospective chart review was performed on a subset of 507 patients with CRSsNP and 874 with CRSwNP. Characteristics analyzed included demographics, comorbid conditions, and radiologic sinus severity.

Results: Of the total CRS population, approximately 82% had CRSsNP and 18% had CRSwNP. Of the 507 patients in the CRSsNP group, 319 (63%) were female compared with 393 of 847 (45%) in the CRSwNP group. The prevalence of atopy was 52% in CRSsNP versus 76% in CRSwNP (P < .0001). In CRSsNP, atopic patients had more severe radiographic disease compared with nonatopic patients (P < .005). The prevalence of asthma was 36% in CRSsNP versus 56% in CRSwNP (P < .0001). Comorbid asthma was not associated with radiographic sinus disease severity in CRSsNP but was associated with severity in CRSwNP (P < .0001).

Conclusions: The relative prevalence of CRS phenotypes in the western population is approximately 80% CRSsNP and 20% CRSwNP. Patients with CRSsNP were predominantly female, whereas patients with CRSwNP were predominantly male. The prevalence of asthma was higher in our cohort of patients with CRSsNP than previously described. Atopy was associated with more severe radiographic sinonasal disease in CRSsNP, whereas asthma was not associated with radiographic sinonasal disease severity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaip.2018.10.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6862765PMC
March 2019

Mepolizumab use: Post-approval academic practice experience.

Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 2018 07 10;121(1):126-128. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. Electronic address:

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anai.2018.04.001DOI Listing
July 2018