Publications by authors named "Marie-Odile Roy"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Discovery and optimization of novel antagonists to the human neurokinin-3 receptor for the treatment of sex-hormone disorders (Part I).

J Med Chem 2015 Apr 18;58(7):3060-82. Epub 2015 Mar 18.

Euroscreen SA, 47 Rue Adrienne Bolland, 6041 Gosselies, Belgium.

Neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) has recently emerged as important in modulating the tonic pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) release. We therefore decided to explore NK3R antagonists as therapeutics for sex-hormone disorders that can potentially benefit from lowering GnRH pulsatility with consequent diminished levels of plasma luteinizing hormone (LH) and correspondingly attenuated levels of circulating androgens and estrogens. The discovery and lead optimization of a novel N-acyl-triazolopiperazine NK3R antagonist chemotype achieved through bioisosteric lead change from the high-throughput screening (HTS) hit is described. A concomitant improvement in the antagonist bioactivity and ligand lipophilic efficiency (LLE) parameter were the principal guidelines in the lead optimization efforts. Examples of advanced lead analogues to demonstrate the amenability of this chemotype to achieving a suitable pharmacokinetic (PK) profile are provided as well as pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) correlations to analyze the trends observed for LH inhibition in castrated rats and monkeys that served as preliminary in vivo efficacy models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jm5017413DOI Listing
April 2015

Oxysterols direct immune cell migration via EBI2.

Nature 2011 Jul 27;475(7357):524-7. Epub 2011 Jul 27.

Euroscreen S.A., 6041 Gosselies, Belgium.

Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2, also known as GPR183) is a G-protein-coupled receptor that is required for humoral immune responses; polymorphisms in the receptor have been associated with inflammatory autoimmune diseases. The natural ligand for EBI2 has been unknown. Here we describe the identification of 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (also called 7α,25-OHC or 5-cholesten-3β,7α,25-triol) as a potent and selective agonist of EBI2. Functional activation of human EBI2 by 7α,25-OHC and closely related oxysterols was verified by monitoring second messenger readouts and saturable, high-affinity radioligand binding. Furthermore, we find that 7α,25-OHC and closely related oxysterols act as chemoattractants for immune cells expressing EBI2 by directing cell migration in vitro and in vivo. A critical enzyme required for the generation of 7α,25-OHC is cholesterol 25-hydroxylase (CH25H). Similar to EBI2 receptor knockout mice, mice deficient in CH25H fail to position activated B cells within the spleen to the outer follicle and mount a reduced plasma cell response after an immune challenge. This demonstrates that CH25H generates EBI2 biological activity in vivo and indicates that the EBI2-oxysterol signalling pathway has an important role in the adaptive immune response.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature10280DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4297623PMC
July 2011

The role of ChemR23 in the induction and resolution of cigarette smoke-induced inflammation.

J Immunol 2011 May 23;186(9):5457-67. Epub 2011 Mar 23.

Laboratory for Translational Research in Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is mainly triggered by cigarette smoke (CS) and progresses even after smoking cessation. CS induces an exaggerated influx of inflammatory cells to the bronchoalveolar space and lung parenchyma, likely resulting from a complex interplay between chemoattractants and their respective receptors. In a murine CS model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, we studied the importance of chemokine-like receptor ChemR23 for the induction and resolution of inflammation in CS-exposed lungs. Subacute and chronic CS exposure increased protein levels of the ChemR23 ligand and chemoattractant, chemerin, in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of wild-type (WT) mice. Moreover, the proinflammatory chemokines CXCL1, CCL2, and CCL20 were increased in the airways of CS-exposed WT mice, accompanied by a massive accumulation of inflammatory neutrophils and monocytes, CD11b(hi)CD103(-) and CD11b(lo)CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs), and CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. The lung parenchyma of WT mice was infiltrated with inflammatory neutrophils, CD11b(hi)CD103(-) DCs, and activated CD4(+) T cells after CS exposure. CS-induced inflammation was severely attenuated in BAL fluid and lungs of ChemR23 knockout mice with regard to the induction of inflammatory chemokines and the recruitment of inflammatory cells. Neutrophils and CD8(+) T cells persisted in the airways of WT mice, as did the airway-derived conventional DCs in the mediastinal lymph nodes, for at least 14 d after smoking cessation. In the BAL fluid of CS-exposed ChemR23 knockout mice, there was a remarkable delayed accumulation of T cells 14 d after the final exposure. Our data support a role for ChemR23 in directing innate and adaptive immune cells to CS-exposed lungs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4049/jimmunol.1003862DOI Listing
May 2011

Discovery of 3-aryl-5-acylpiperazinyl-pyrazoles as antagonists to the NK3 receptor.

Bioorg Med Chem Lett 2011 Apr 13;21(7):1991-6. Epub 2011 Feb 13.

Euroscreen SA, 47 rue Adrienne Bolland, Gosselies, Belgium.

A series of 3-aryl-5-acylpiperazinyl-pyrazoles (e.g., 3a-b) initially identified through a high-throughput screening campaign using the aequorin Ca(2+) bioluminescence assay as novel, potent small molecule antagonists of the G protein-coupled human tachykinin NK(3) receptor (hNK3-R) is described. Preliminary profiling revealed poor plasma and metabolic stability for these structures in rodents. Further optimization efforts resulted in analogs with improved potency, stability, and pharmacokinetic properties as well as good brain permeability, for example, compounds 26 and 42. Unexpected cytotoxicity was observed in such N-Me pyrazole structures as compounds 41-42.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bmcl.2011.02.033DOI Listing
April 2011

Sensory neuron-specific receptor activation elicits central and peripheral nociceptive effects in rats.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2004 May 26;101(18):7175-80. Epub 2004 Apr 26.

AstraZeneca R & D Montréal, 7171 Frederick-Banting, Ville Saint-Laurent, Québec, Canada H4S 1Z9.

The sensory neuron-specific G protein coupled receptors (SNSRs) have been described as a family of receptors whose expression in small diameter sensory neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia suggests an implication in nociception. To date, the physiological function(s) of SNSRs remain unknown. Hence, the aim of the present study was to determine the effects of rat SNSR1 activation on nociception in rats. The pharmacological characterization of rat SNSR1 was initially performed in vitro to identify a specific ligand, which could be used subsequently in the rat for physiological testing. Among all ligands tested, gamma2-MSH was the most potent at activating rat SNSR1. Structure-activity relationship studies revealed that the active moiety recognized by rat SNSR1 was the C-terminal part of gamma2-MSH. The radiolabeled C-terminal part of gamma2-MSH, gamma2-MSH-6-12, bound with high affinity to membranes derived from rat skin and spinal cord, demonstrating the presence of receptor protein at both the proximal and distal terminals of dorsal root ganglia. To investigate the physiological role of SNSR, specific ligands to rat SNSR1 were tested in behavioral assays of pain sensitivity in rats. Selective rat SNSR1 agonists produced spontaneous pain behavior, enhanced heat and mechanical sensitivity when injected intradermally, and heat hypersensitivity when injected centrally, consistent with the localization of rat SNSR1 protein at central and peripheral sites. Together, these results clearly indicate that the SNSR1 plays a role in nociception and may provide novel therapeutic opportunities for analgesia.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0307185101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC406485PMC
May 2004

Annexin-I expression modulates drug resistance in tumor cells.

Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2004 Feb;314(2):565-70

Institute of Parasitology, McGill University, Macdonald Campus, Ste-Anne de Bellevue, Que., Canada.

The use of anti-cancer chemotherapy often leads to the rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumors. We have previously reported the overexpression of a 40kDa protein (P-40) in several MDR tumor cell lines. In this report we describe the cloning of a 1.4kb cDNA with an open reading frame of 344 amino acids that encodes the P-40 protein. Analysis of the P-40 amino acid sequence showed it is identical to the human annexin I (Anx-I) protein. The identity of the isolated P-40 cDNA as Anx-I was confirmed by the specific binding of IPM96 mAb to a 40kDa protein following the in vitro expression of P-40 full-length cDNA. Northern blot analysis of total RNA from drug-sensitive and -resistant cells revealed an increase in P-40 (or Anx-I) mRNA in drug-resistant cells relative to drug-sensitive cells. Transfection of Anx-I cDNA into drug-sensitive MCF-7 cells was carried out without further drug selection and showed 2- to 5-fold increase in resistance of transfected cells to adriamycin, melphalan, and etoposide. Conversely, transfection of reverse Anx-I cDNA into SKOV-3 cells decreased the expression of Anx-I without affecting the expression of other members of the annexin family and showed a 3- to 8-fold increase in sensitivity to these drugs. Of interest was the correlation between the presence of Anx-I and MDR in MDA-MB-231 cells when compared to MCF-7 cells. MDA-MB-231 cells show 3- to 20-fold increase in resistance to adriamycin, melphalan, and etoposide in the absence of detectable levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp1), the multidrug resistance protein (MRP1) or the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP). Taken together, these results provide the first direct evidence for the role of Anx-I in MDR of tumor cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbrc.2003.12.117DOI Listing
February 2004

A truncated form of CKbeta8-1 is a potent agonist for human formyl peptide-receptor-like 1 receptor.

Br J Pharmacol 2004 Jan 8;141(1):37-46. Epub 2003 Dec 8.

AstraZeneca R&D Montréal, 7171 Frederick-Banting, Ville Saint-Laurent, Québec, Canada, H4S 1Z9.

1. Human formyl peptide-receptor-like-1 (FPRL-1) is a promiscuous G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), and belongs to a chemoattractant receptor family protein. This receptor has been reported to interact with various host-derived peptides and lipids involved in inflammatory responses. We described here, a novel role for FPRL-1 as a high-affinity beta-chemokine receptor for an N-terminally truncated form of the CKbeta8 (CCL23/MPIF-1) splice variant CKbeta8-1 (22-137 aa). 2. RT-PCR analysis of mRNA derived from human tissues and cells revealed a predominant expression of FPRL-1 in inflammatory cells, particularly in neutrophils. 3. Intracellular calcium mobilisation assay, used as screening tool, in recombinant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human embryonic kidney (HEK293s) cells coexpressing FPRL-1 and Galpha(16), demonstrated FPRL-1 is a functional high-affinity receptor for CKbeta8-1 (46-137 aa, sCKbeta8-1), with pEC(50) values of 9.13 and 8.85, respectively. 4. The FPRL-1 activation in CHO-K1 cells is mediated by Galpha(i)/Galpha(o) proteins, as assessed by pertussis toxin sensitivity and inhibition of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation. 5. Binding experiments were performed with a radio-iodinated synthetic peptide, [(125-)I]-WKYMVm, a known potent FPRL-1 agonist. CHO-K1 cell membranes expressing FPRL-1 bound [(125-)I]-WKYMVm with a K(d) value of 9.34. Many known FPRL-1 agonists were tested and sCKbeta8-1 was the most effective nonsynthetic ligand in displacing the radiolabelled agonist, with a pIC(50) of 7.97. 6. The functional significance of sCKbeta8-1 interaction with FPRL-1 was further demonstrated by the activation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) calcium mobilisation and chemotaxis. These interactions were shown to be via FPRL-1 by specific blockade of PMNs activation in the presence of an FPRL-1 antibody.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjp.0705592DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1574175PMC
January 2004

Does fusion of domains from unrelated proteins affect their folding pathways and the structural changes involved in their function? A case study with the diphtheria toxin T domain.

Protein Eng 2002 May;15(5):383-91

Département d'Ingénierie et d'Etudes des Protéines, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette cedex, France.

We investigated whether the structural and functional behaviors of two unrelated protein domains were modified when fused. The IgG-binding protein ZZ derived from staphylococcal protein A was fused to the N- and/or C-terminus of the diphtheria toxin transmembrane domain (T). T undergoes a conformational change from a soluble native state at neutral pH to a molten globule-like state at acidic pH, leading to its interaction with membranes. We found that this molten globule state was not connected to the GdnHCl-induced unfolding pathway of T. The pH-induced transition of T, and also the unfolding of T and ZZ at neutral and acidic pH, were unchanged whether the domains were isolated or fused. The position of ZZ, however, influenced the solubility of T near its pK(i). SPR measurements revealed that T has a high affinity for membranes, isolated or within the fusion proteins (K(D)< 10(-11) M). This work shows that in the case of T and ZZ, the fusion of protein domains with different stabilities does not alter the structural changes involved in folding and function. This supports the use of T as a soluble membrane anchor.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/protein/15.5.383DOI Listing
May 2002

Proenkephalin A gene products activate a new family of sensory neuron--specific GPCRs.

Nat Neurosci 2002 Mar;5(3):201-9

AstraZeneca R&D Montreal, 7171 Frederick-Banting, Ville Saint-Laurent, Quebec H4S 1Z9, Canada.

Several peptide fragments are produced by proteolytic cleavage of the opioid peptide precursor proenkephalin A, and among these are a number of enkephalin fragments, in particular bovine adrenal medulla peptide 22 (BAM22). These peptide products have been implicated in diverse biological functions, including analgesia. We have cloned a newly identified family of 'orphan' G protein--coupled receptors (GPCRs) and demonstrate that BAM22 and a number of its fragments bind to and activate these receptors with nanomolar affinities. This family of GPCRs is uniquely localized in the human and rat small sensory neuron, and we called this family the sensory neuron--specific G protein--coupled receptors (SNSRs). Receptors of the SNSR family are distinct from the traditional opioid receptors in their insensitivity to the classical opioid antagonist naloxone and poor activation by opioid ligands. The unique localization of SNSRs and their activation by proenkephalin A peptide fragments indicate a possible function for SNSRs in sensory neuron regulation and in the modulation of nociception.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nn815DOI Listing
March 2002