Publications by authors named "Marie-Line Gaubert-Dahan"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

The impact of medication review with version 2 STOPP (Screening Tool of Older Person's Prescriptions) and START (Screening Tool to Alert doctors to Right Treatment) criteria in a French nursing home: a 3-month follow-up study.

Ther Adv Drug Saf 2019 9;10:2042098619855535. Epub 2019 Jun 9.

Observatoire du Médicament des Dispositifs Médicaux et de l'Innovation Thérapeutique, Paris, France.

Background: Improving medication appropriateness is a priority of French national campaigns in nursing homes. A pilot study was conducted to evaluate the impact of a medication review in a French nursing home with a 3-month follow up.

Method: A medication review was conducted in 2015 using version 2 STOPP and START criteria. The number and type of drugs meeting a STOPP that were reintroduced and the number and type of drug meeting a START that were stopped during follow up were measured. An expert committee adjudicated whether 3-month hospitalizations and deaths were related to medication review. The impact of medication review on the cost related to drug consumption was calculated for 3 months.

Results: The 52 residents (age 84 ± 9 years, 83% female) fulfilled, on average, 2 ± 1.4 of the STOPP criteria and 0.7 ± 0.6 of the START criteria. A total of 101 drugs were stopped and 34 drugs were started. Five deaths occurred during follow up and were judged as not related to medication review. Five drugs stopped were reintroduced in five residents for a rebound effect or a symptom occurrence and one resident had stopped a START medication (aspirin) for a minor adverse drug reaction. At 3 months, a gain of 20.21 ± 31.34 euros per resident was observed.

Conclusion: The medication review using version 2 STOPP and START criteria and involving the physician in charge seems useful for detecting and correcting inappropriate prescribing in a nursing home.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2042098619855535DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6558549PMC
June 2019

Prevention of pressure ulcers with a motorized air support in at-risk patients hospitalized in rehabilitation departments APAM + an observational prevalence study with historical control and incidence study.

Panminerva Med 2018 Dec 28;60(4):161-169. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Rehabilitation, University Hospital, Saint-Etienne, France.

Background: The main study was a cross-sectional multicenter study of the prevalence of pressure ulcers in rehabilitation services (RS) where Axtair Automorpho® Plus mattresses were made available ad libitum. The primary objective was to enable comparison with prevalence as observed in the national PERSE study (historical control) in similar departments using a variety of prevention aids.

Methods: This cross-sectional prevalence study was combined with a prospective study of the incidence of pressure ulcer occurrence in the high-risk target population whose beds were systematically equipped with the studied support.

Results: On the day of the prevalence study, 18 of the 456 patients presented pressure ulcers which occurred during the period when Axtair Automorpho® Plus supports were made available to the departments. This corresponds to a prevalence of 3.9% [2.4, 6.2] which is significantly lower than those recorded in the PERSE study: 11.8% [10.8; 12.8] p <0.0001. The ulcer incidence study covers 57 patients who were hospitalized on a bed with an Axtair Automorpho® Plus support because of their risk of contracting pressure ulcers. One pressure ulcer occurred in 3 patients and 3 pressure ulcers occurred in another patient, i.e. 4 out of 57 corresponding to an incidence of 7.0% [2.0; 17.0].

Conclusions: The results of the pressure ulcer prevalence study in rehabilitation departments where Axtair Automorpho® Plus supports were available as well as results of the study of pressure ulcer incidence in patients bedridden on Axtair Automorpho® Plus, confirm the expected benefit provided to patients in terms of prevention.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0031-0808.18.03491-2DOI Listing
December 2018

[What happened after meprobamate's withdrawal? Survey in two nursing homes].

Soins Gerontol 2016 Mar-Apr(118):26-30

GHI Le Raincy-Montfermeil, pôle Gériatrie-SSR, service de SSR, 13 place Jean Mermoz, 93370 Montfermeil, France. Electronic address:

We have conducted in two nursing homes a survey to study the impact of meprobamate's withdrawal, at the beginning of 2012, in terms of extent of prescribing to others psychotropic drugs and occurrence of adverse events. After meprobamate's withdrawal, 65 % of residents did not receive alternative medication and within three months after meprobamate stopping, adverse events (drowsiness, falls and hospitalization) decreased while agitation did not increase.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sger.2016.01.010DOI Listing
June 2016

Severe sensory neuropathy increases risk of heel pressure ulcer in older adults.

J Am Geriatr Soc 2013 Nov;61(11):2050-2

Geriatrics Department, Bretonneau Hospital, Paris, France; Laboratory of Tissue Biology and Therapeutic Engineering, UMR CNRS 5305, University Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Lyon, France.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jgs.12532DOI Listing
November 2013

[Hospitalization of elderly in an acute-care geriatric department].

Geriatr Psychol Neuropsychiatr Vieil 2012 Jun;10(2):143-50

Service de gériatrie, Hôpital Bichat-Claude Bernard, APHP, Paris.

Hospital admissions following emergency visits of elderly people are frequent. This admission modality is often problematic both for the patients and the emergency healthcare professionals. Direct admission from home (or nursing home) in acute geriatric units (AGU) has been developed but has never been prospectively assessed. We conducted a 6-month prospective observational study to compare the 97 patients admitted through the emergency room (ER) in the AGU of Bichat's hospital to the 76 patients admitted directly. Collected data included socio-demographic and medical baseline data, clinical severity score at admission, cause of hospitalization, final diagnosis, in-hospital occurrence of urinary retention and of pressure ulcer, length of stay, discharge disposition and mortality. No significant differences between the groups were found for most baseline characteristics, clinical severity score, occurrence of pressure ulcers, length of stay and mortality. However ER patients were significantly older (88±6 vs 86±7 years, p=0.04) and had more often history of arrhythmia (29% vs 15%, p=0.02) and protein-energy malnutrition preceding admission (63% vs 46%, p=0.03). Falls as admission cause was more common in ER patients while unexplained health status or functional decline were most common in those admitted directly. Clinical outcomes were less favourable in ER patients with significantly more urinary retentions (25% vs 4%, p=0.0002) and transfers to rehabilitation units (48% vs 31%, p=0.04). The patients admitted directly returned more often at home without additional social support (53% vs 30%, p=0.001). Direct admission in AGU is feasible, medically effective and provides an alternative to attending an emergency room. This admission modality could be specially suitable for elder people suffering from an unexplained functional or health status declines. Further studies are necessary to support the hypothesis that quality gains and cost-effective measures may be achieved by dissemination of such an admission modality at the hospital.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/pnv.2012.0350DOI Listing
June 2012

[Beyond to pattern of risk factors in elderly subjects].

Geriatr Psychol Neuropsychiatr Vieil 2011 Sep;9(3):277-85

Service de gériatrie, Hôpital Bretonneau, APHP, Paris.

Unlabelled: Most falls in the elderly result from an interaction between several risk factors in. Interventions targeting risk factors for a fall have been effective in the prevention of falls. The aim of this prospective study was to identify pattern of risk factors in hospitalized elderly subjects for fall in a geriatric acute care unit.

Methods: over a 5-year period, 471 patients hospitalized in the geriatric unit of Angers Hospital following a fall were randomly assigned to 471 patients without any fall history. The prevalence of risk factors for a fall, and the existence of predisposing and precipitating factors were compared between the two groups.

Results: risk factors for fall, namely gait unsteadiness, hip disorders, peripheral neuropathy, convulsions and syncope, were significantly more prevalent in the group of fallers compared to the controls. Two faller patterns were proposed: (1) patients with depression and receiving benzodiazepine and neuroleptic, and (2) patients with poor vision and osteoarticular disorders. Two further factors, namely parkinsonism and foot disorders, seemed to be sufficient to explain a fall.

Conclusion: this study for the first time has identified risk factors patterns of fall in elderly patients hospitalized in a geriatric acute care unit, which can be used to implement diagnosis and treatment strategies.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/pnv.2011.0289DOI Listing
September 2011

[Impact of low-molecular-weight heparin practice guidelines in a geriatric hospital].

Geriatr Psychol Neuropsychiatr Vieil 2011 Jun;9(2):179-88

APHP, Hôpital Bretonneau, Service de gériatrie, ParisAPHP, Hôpital Bretonneau, Service de gériatrie, Paris.

The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of good use of anticoagulants guidelines implementation on low molecular weight heparin (LMWH) prescription in a french geriatric hospital. This interventional "before and after" study was conduced by the same geriatrician on a d-day in 2006 and 2009. Guidelines for anticoagulant's prescription based on selected references in the literature was established by an expert's consensus and implemented in 2008. Data were collected in all departments at the Sainte-Perine geriatric hospital for each patient with an LMWH prescription. Assessment was based on quality judgment criteria (indication, dosage, treatment duration, biological monitoring of LMWH). Data were collected for 72 prescriptions prior to the guidelines implementation and for 54 after. Sex-ratio, mean age and percentage of LMWH prescription did not differ significantly between the two periods. There was a better conformity for LMWH dosage prescription (p = 0.002) and biological monitoring prescription (p = 0.036) after the guidelines implementation. Conformity of LMWH indication and treatment duration were improved but the difference remained not significant (respectively p = 0.49 and p = 0.80). Implementing guidelines for LMWH use in geriatrics can improve quality of prescription. The impact was effective but limited. These guidelines are now in general use in the Sainte-Perine hospital.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1684/pnv.2011.0283DOI Listing
June 2011

Aging-associated sensory neuropathy alters pressure-induced vasodilation in humans.

J Invest Dermatol 2010 Mar 3;130(3):849-55. Epub 2009 Sep 3.

Neurovascular Interactions, FRE CNRS 3075, University Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Département de Physilogie, Lyon, France.

Healthy skin is protected from pressure-induced ischemic damage because of the presence of pressure-induced vasodilation (PIV). PIV relies on small sensory nerve fibers and endothelial function. Since aging alters both nervous and vascular functions, we hypothesized that PIV is altered with aging. We compared PIV in non-neuropathic and neuropathic older subjects (60-75 years) with that of young subjects (20-35 years). Laser Doppler flowmetry was used to evaluate the cutaneous responses to local pressure application, acetylcholine, and local heating. Quantitative sensory tests were used to evaluate sensory-nerve-fiber function. The non-neuropathic older subjects had an impaired PIV (12+/-7% increase in blood flow with pressure) compared with young subjects (62+/-4%, P<0.001). In the presence of peripheral neuropathy, the older subjects were totally deprived of PIV, leading to early pressure-induced cutaneous ischemia (-31+/-10%, P<0.001). This inability of the skin to adapt to localized pressure in older subjects is related to the severity of the sensory-fiber dysfunction rather than to endothelial dysfunction, which was comparable between the non-neuropathic (141+/-19% increased blood flow with acetylcholine, P<0.05) and neuropathic older subjects (145+/-28% increase, P<0.05) compared with young subjects (234+/-25% increase).
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jid.2009.279DOI Listing
March 2010