Publications by authors named "Marie-Laure Cortes-Dubly"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bordetella bronchiseptica experimental model development in pigs and efficacy evaluation of a single intramuscular injection of gamithromycin (Zactran® for Swine) against Bordetella bronchiseptica-associated respiratory disease in experimentally infected piglets.

J Vet Pharmacol Ther 2020 Mar 24;43(2):197-207. Epub 2019 Dec 24.

Merial SAS, Lyon, France.

In the Bordetella bronchiseptica infection model development study, twenty-eight piglets were inoculated with B. bronchiseptica strain of either canine (10  CFU/ml) or swine (10 and 10  CFU/ml) origin; swine origin strain at 10  CFU/ml was chosen for the efficacy assessment study due to higher incidence and severity of gross and histopathological lesions compared with other strains. To assess efficacy of gamithromycin against B. bronchiseptica, forty piglets were experimentally inoculated on Day 0 and clinical signs were scored as per severity. Animals were then treated either with gamithromycin or saline on Day 3. The Global Clinical Scores in gamithromycin-treated group were consistently lower than the saline-treated control group from Day 4 onwards and were 0 and 40 in the gamithromycin-treated and saline-treated control groups, respectively, on Day 6. Severity and frequency of gross and histopathological observations were significantly lower in gamithromycin-treated animals compared with saline-treated controls. The efficacy of Zactran® for Swine at the label dose for the treatment of B. bronchiseptica-associated respiratory disease was demonstrated based on the faster reduction in clinical signs as early as 1 day post-gamithromycin treatment and based on the significant difference in the severity of macroscopic and microscopic lung lesions 10 days post-gamithromycin treatment.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jvp.12834DOI Listing
March 2020

Prevention of canine ocular thelaziosis (Thelazia callipaeda) with a combination of milbemycin oxime and afoxolaner (Nexgard Spectra) in endemic areas in France and Spain.

Parasite 2019 15;26. Epub 2019 Jan 15.

Boehringer Ingelheim Animal Health, 29 avenue Tony Garnier, 69007 Lyon, France.

In the past decade, canine thelaziosis due to Thelazia callipaeda has been diagnosed in an increasing number of European countries, with endemic areas being identified. A multi-center field trial was conducted in endemic areas in France and Spain to evaluate the efficacy of monthly administrations of the oral milbemycin oxime/afoxolaner combination (NexGard Spectra) for the prevention of T. callipaeda infection in at-risk dogs. A total of 79 dogs negative for T. callipaeda and with a clinical history of eyeworm infection in the past two years completed the study. Dogs were randomly allocated either to a negative control group (42 dogs) or to the NexGard Spectra treated group (37 dogs). All dogs were followed up for a 6-month period and assessed monthly for the presence of nematodes on the eyes and for the signs of ocular thelaziosis (e.g., conjunctivitis, keratitis, and ocular discharge). When the presence of nematodes was confirmed, the conjunctival fornix was flushed with a saline solution for parasite recovery and counting, and the dogs were treated appropriately. Recovered parasites were stored in 70% alcohol for subsequent morphological identification. During the course of the study, 57.1% (24/42) of the control dogs were diagnosed positive for Thelazia infection, which illustrates a high incidence rate of parasite infection. Conversely, no eyeworm was recovered from any of the 37 dogs that received NexGard Spectra. All parasites sampled were confirmed to be T. callipaeda. This clinical field study demonstrated that monthly administrations of NexGard Spectra provided 100% preventive efficacy against canine thelaziosis.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/parasite/2019001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6333103PMC
January 2019

Blood hypercoagulability and systemic inflammation in horses with heaves.

Vet J 2015 Oct 14;206(1):105-7. Epub 2015 Apr 14.

Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculté de Médecine Vétérinaire, Université de Montréal, 3200 Sicotte, Saint-Hyacinthe, J2S 7C6, Québec, Canada.

As inflammation and coagulation are intertwined processes, the efficiency of blood coagulation of heaves-affected horses and controls were compared in an observational case-control study, using thrombelastography. In experiment 1 (Exacerbation, six heaves, five controls), horses were housed indoors and fed hay. Thrombelastography, functional fibrinogen, platelet count, hematology, and antithrombin were measured. In experiment 2 (Remission, eight heaves, 11 controls), horses were housed in a low-dust environment for at least a month when thrombelastography was performed. Heaves-affected horses in exacerbation had greater maximum amplitude and higher functional fibrinogen than controls. Heaves-affected horses in clinical remission had greater maximum amplitude than controls. The hypercoagulable state and systemic inflammation of horses with heaves may be a consequence of pulmonary inflammation and may contribute to the perpetuation of airway dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2015.04.012DOI Listing
October 2015

Bilateral uterine vessel ligation as a model of intrauterine growth restriction in mice.

Reprod Biol Endocrinol 2014 Jul 8;12:62. Epub 2014 Jul 8.

Department of Nephrology, Hypertension and Clinical Pharmacology, Inselspital, University of Bern Medical School, Bern, Switzerland.

Background: Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) occurs in up to 10% of pregnancies and is considered as a major risk to develop various diseases in adulthood, such as cardiovascular diseases, insulin resistance, hypertension or end stage kidney disease. Several IUGR models have been developed in order to understand the biological processes linked to fetal growth retardation, most of them being rat or mouse models and nutritional models. In order to reproduce altered placental flow, surgical models have also been developed, and among them bilateral uterine ligation has been frequently used. Nevertheless, this model has never been developed in the mouse, although murine tools display multiple advantages for biological research. The aim of this work was therefore to develop a mouse model of bilateral uterine ligation as a surgical model of IUGR.

Results: In this report, we describe the set up and experimental data obtained from three different protocols (P1, P2, P3) of bilateral uterine vessel ligation in the mouse. Ligation was either performed at the cervical end of each uterine horn (P1) or at the central part of each uterine horn (P2 and P3). Time of surgery was E16 (P1), E17 (P2) or E16.5 (P3). Mortality, maternal weight and abortion parameters were recorded, as well as placentas weights, fetal resorption, viability, fetal weight and size. Results showed that P1 in test animals led to IUGR but was also accompanied with high mortality rate of mothers (50%), low viability of fetuses (8%) and high resorption rate (25%). P2 and P3 improved most of these parameters (decreased mortality and improved pregnancy outcomes; improved fetal viability to 90% and 27%, respectively) nevertheless P2 was not associated to IUGR contrary to P3. Thus P3 experimental conditions enable IUGR with better pregnancy and fetuses outcomes parameters that allow its use in experimental studies.

Conclusions: Our results show that bilateral uterine artery ligation according to the protocol we have developed and validated can be used as a surgical mouse model of IUGR.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1477-7827-12-62DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4105874PMC
July 2014