Publications by authors named "Marie-Claire Boerwinkel"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Calibration and validation of toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic models for three neonicotinoids and some aquatic macroinvertebrates.

Ecotoxicology 2018 Sep 1;27(7):992-1007. Epub 2018 May 1.

Wageningen Environmental Research, Wageningen University and Research, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Exposure patterns in ecotoxicological experiments often do not match the exposure profiles for which a risk assessment needs to be performed. This limitation can be overcome by using toxicokinetic-toxicodynamic (TKTD) models for the prediction of effects under time-variable exposure. For the use of TKTD models in the environmental risk assessment of chemicals, it is required to calibrate and validate the model for specific compound-species combinations. In this study, the survival of macroinvertebrates after exposure to the neonicotinoid insecticide was modelled using TKTD models from the General Unified Threshold models of Survival (GUTS) framework. The models were calibrated on existing survival data from acute or chronic tests under static exposure regime. Validation experiments were performed for two sets of species-compound combinations: one set focussed on multiple species sensitivity to a single compound: imidacloprid, and the other set on the effects of multiple compounds for a single species, i.e., the three neonicotinoid compounds imidacloprid, thiacloprid and thiamethoxam, on the survival of the mayfly Cloeon dipterum. The calibrated models were used to predict survival over time, including uncertainty ranges, for the different time-variable exposure profiles used in the validation experiments. From the comparison between observed and predicted survival, it appeared that the accuracy of the model predictions was acceptable for four of five tested species in the multiple species data set. For compounds such as neonicotinoids, which are known to have the potential to show increased toxicity under prolonged exposure, the calibration and validation of TKTD models for survival needs to be performed ideally by considering calibration data from both acute and chronic tests.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10646-018-1940-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6132984PMC
September 2018

Exposure and effects of sediment-spiked fludioxonil on macroinvertebrates and zooplankton in outdoor aquatic microcosms.

Sci Total Environ 2018 Jan 30;610-611:1222-1238. Epub 2017 Aug 30.

Wageningen Environmental Research (Alterra), Wageningen University and Research, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands. Electronic address:

Information from effects of pesticides in sediments at an ecosystem level, to validate current and proposed risk assessment procedures, is scarce. A sediment-spiked outdoor freshwater microcosm experiment was conducted with fludioxonil (lipophilic, non-systemic fungicide) to study exposure dynamics and treatment-related responses of benthic and pelagic macroinvertebrates and zooplankton. Besides blank control and solvent control systems the experiment had six different treatment levels (1.7-614mga.s./kg dry sediment) based around the reported 28-d No Observed Effect Concentration (NOEC) for Chironomus riparius (40mga.s./kg dry sediment). Twelve systems were available per treatment of which four were sacrificed on each of days 28, 56 and 84 after microcosm construction. Fludioxonil persisted in the sediment and mean measured concentrations were 53-82% of the initial concentration after 84days. The dissipation rate increased with the treatment level. Also exposure concentrations in overlying water were long-term, with highest concentrations 28days after initiation of the experiment. Sediment-dwelling Oligochaeta and pelagic Rotifera and Cladocera showed the most pronounced treatment-related declines. The most sensitive sediment-dwelling oligochaete was Dero digitata (population NOEC 14.2mga.s./kg dry sediment). The same NOEC was calculated for the sediment-dwelling macroinvertebrate community. The most sensitive zooplankton species was the cladoceran Diaphanosoma brachyurum (NOEC of 1.6μga.s./L in overlying water corresponding to 5.0mga.s./kg dry sediment). At the two highest treatments several rotifer taxa showed a pronounced decrease, while the zooplankton community-level NOEC was 5.6μga.s./L (corresponding to 14.2mga.s./kg dry sediment). Zooplankton taxa calanoid Copepoda and Daphnia gr. longispina showed a pronounced treatment-related increase (indirect effects). Consequently, an assessment factor of 10 to the chronic laboratory NOECs of Chironomus riparius (sediment) and Daphnia magna (water) results in a regulatory acceptable concentration that is sufficiently protective for both the sediment-dwelling and pelagic organisms in the microcosms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.08.155DOI Listing
January 2018

Chronic aquatic effect assessment for the fungicide azoxystrobin.

Environ Toxicol Chem 2014 Dec 27;33(12):2775-85. Epub 2014 Oct 27.

Alterra, Wageningen University and Research Center, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

The present study examined the ecological effects of a range of chronic exposure concentrations of the fungicide azoxystrobin in freshwater experimental systems (1270-L outdoor microcosms). Intended and environmentally relevant test concentrations of azoxystrobin were 0 µg active ingredient (a.i.)/L, 0.33 µg a.i./L, 1 µg a.i./L, 3.3 µg a.i./L, 10 µg a.i./L, and 33 µg a.i./L, kept at constant values. Responses of freshwater populations and community parameters were studied. During the 42-d experimental period, the time-weighted average concentrations of azoxystrobin ranged from 93.5% to 99.3% of intended values. Zooplankton, especially copepods and the Daphnia longispina group, were the most sensitive groups. At the population level, a consistent no-observed-effect concentration (NOEC) of 1 µg a.i./L was calculated for Copepoda. The NOEC at the zooplankton community level was 10 µg azoxystrobin/L. The principle of the European Union pesticide directive is that lower-tier regulatory acceptable concentrations (RACs) are protective of higher-tier RACs. This was tested for chronic risks from azoxystrobin. With the exception of the microcosm community chronic RAC (highest tier), all other chronic RAC values were similar to each other (0.5-1 µg a.i./L). The new and stricter first-tier species requirements of the European Union pesticide regulation (1107/2009/EC) are not protective for the most sensitive populations in the microcosm study, when based on the higher tier population RAC. In comparison, the Water Framework Directive generates environmental quality standards that are 5 to 10 times lower than the derived chronic RACs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/etc.2739DOI Listing
December 2014

Species traits as predictors for intrinsic sensitivity of aquatic invertebrates to the insecticide chlorpyrifos.

Ecotoxicology 2012 Oct 19;21(7):2088-101. Epub 2012 Jun 19.

Department of Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management, Wageningen University, P.O. Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Ecological risk assessment (ERA) has followed a taxonomy-based approach, making the assumption that related species will show similar sensitivity to toxicants, and using safety factors or species sensitivity distributions to extrapolate from tested to untested species. In ecology it has become apparent that taxonomic approaches may have limitations for the description and understanding of species assemblages in nature. Therefore it has been proposed that the inclusion of species traits in ERA could provide a useful and alternative description of the systems under investigation. At the same time, there is a growing recognition that the use of mechanistic approaches in ERA, including conceptual and quantitative models, may improve predictive and extrapolative power. Purposefully linking traits with mechanistic effect models could add value to taxonomy-based ERA by improving our understanding of how structural and functional system facets may facilitate inter-species extrapolation. Here, we explore whether and in what ways traits can be linked purposefully to mechanistic effect models to predict intrinsic sensitivity using available data on the acute sensitivity and toxicokinetics of a range of freshwater arthropods exposed to chlorpyrifos. The results of a quantitative linking of seven different endpoints and twelve traits demonstrate that while quantitative links between traits and/or trait combinations and process based (toxicokinetic) model parameters can be established, the use of simple traits to predict classical sensitivity endpoints yields little insight. Remarkably, neither of the standard sensitivity values, i.e. the LC(50) or EC(50), showed a strong correlation with traits. Future research in this area should include a quantitative linking of toxicodynamic parameter estimations and physiological traits, and requires further consideration of how mechanistic trait-process/parameter links can be used for prediction of intrinsic sensitivity across species for different substances in ERA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10646-012-0962-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3431471PMC
October 2012

Cadmium accumulation in small mammals: species traits, soil properties, and spatial habitat use.

Environ Sci Technol 2011 Sep 2;45(17):7497-502. Epub 2011 Aug 2.

Alterra, Wageningen UR, PO-Box 47, 6700 AA Wageningen, The Netherlands.

In this study, the impact of species-specific spatial habitat use, diet preferences, and soil concentrations and properties on the accumulation of cadmium in small mammals was investigated. The results show that for the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus), a mobile species with a large range in diet composition, accumulation of cadmium was not related to local soil concentrations or soil properties, but to diet preferences. For the common vole (Microtus arvalis), a nonmobile, specific feeding species, accumulation of cadmium was related to local soil concentrations or properties. For the bank vole (Myodes glareolus), a species with a smaller home range than the wood mouse but a broader diet spectrum than the common vole, both local soil properties and diet appeared to affect the cadmium accumulation in the kidneys. The results of this field study show that species-specific traits of small mammals are important determinants of accumulation of cadmium on a local scale. For site-specific assessment of risks of contaminants, such information is essential in order to understand exposure dynamics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/es200872pDOI Listing
September 2011

Effects of soil properties on food web accumulation of heavy metals to the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus).

Environ Pollut 2010 Jan 3;158(1):245-51. Epub 2009 Aug 3.

Alterra, Wageningen UR, Box 47, NL-6700AA, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Effects of soil properties on the accumulation of metals to wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus) were evaluated at two sites with different pH and organic matter content of the soil. pH and organic matter content significantly affected accumulation of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in earthworms and vegetation. For Cd, Cu and Zn these effects propagated through the food web to the wood mouse. Soil-to-kidney ratios differed between sites: Cd: 0.15 versus 3.52, Cu: 0.37 versus 1.30 and Zn: 0.33-0.83. This was confirmed in model calculations for Cd and Zn. Results indicate that total soil concentrations may be unsuitable indicators for risks that metals pose to wildlife. Furthermore, environmental managers may, unintentionally, change soil properties while taking specific environmental measures. In this way they may affect risks of metals to wildlife, even without changes in total soil concentrations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2009.07.013DOI Listing
January 2010
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