Publications by authors named "Maribel Plascencia-Jatomea"

23 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[email protected] [email protected] Nanoparticles Synthesized with Rumex hymenosepalus as Antimicrobial Agent.

Nanoscale Res Lett 2021 Jul 22;16(1):118. Epub 2021 Jul 22.

Nanotechnology Graduate Program, Department of Physics, University of Sonora, Rosales and Transversal, 83000, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

In this work, we used a sequential method of synthesis for gold-silver bimetallic nanoparticles with [email protected] structure ([email protected]). Rumex hymenosepalus root extract (Rh), which presents high content in catechins and stilbenes, was used as reductor agent in nanoparticles synthesis. Size distribution obtained by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) gives a mean diameter of 36 ± 11 nm for [email protected], 24 ± 4 nm for gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), and 13 ± 3 nm for silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The geometrical shapes of NPs were principally quasi-spherical. The thickness of the silver shell over AuNPs is around 6 nm and covered by active biomolecules onto the surface. Nanoparticles characterization included high angle annular dark field images (HAADF) recorded with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), UV-Vis Spectroscopy, Zeta Potential, and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) show that nanoparticles are stabilized by extract molecules. A growth kinetics study was performed using the Gompertz model for microorganisms exposed to nanomaterials. The results indicate that AgNPs and [email protected] affect the lag phase and growth rate of Escherichia coli and Candida albicans in a dose-dependent manner, with a better response for [email protected]
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s11671-021-03572-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8298724PMC
July 2021

Synthesis and Characterization of a [email protected] Nanocomposite and Its Potential Application in Vincristine Delivery.

Polymers (Basel) 2021 May 23;13(11). Epub 2021 May 23.

Ingeniería Biomédica, Universidad Estatal de Sonora, Hermosillo 83100, Mexico.

In this research, we conducted a systematic evaluation of the synthesis parameters of a multi-responsive core-shell nanocomposite (FeO nanoparticles coated by poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) in the presence of chitosan (CS) ([email protected]). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to follow the size and morphology of the nanocomposite. The functionalization and the coating of FeO nanoparticles (Nps) were evaluated by the ζ-potential evolution and Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The nanocomposite exhibited a collapsed structure when the temperature was driven above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The LCST was successfully shifted from 33 to 39 °C, which opens the possibility of using it in physiological systems. A magnetometry test was performed to confirm the superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature. The obtained systems allow the possibility to control specific properties, such as particle size and morphology. Finally, we performed vincristine sulfate loading and release tests. Mathematical analysis reveals a two-stage structural-relaxation release model beyond the LCST. In contrast, a temperature of 25 °C promotes the diffusional release model. As a result, a more in-depth comprehension of the release kinetics was achieved. The synthesis and study of a magnetic core-shell nanoplatform offer a smart material as an alternative targeted release therapy due to its thermomagnetic properties.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym13111704DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8197087PMC
May 2021

Characterization of Epigallocatechin-Gallate-Grafted Chitosan Nanoparticles and Evaluation of Their Antibacterial and Antioxidant Potential.

Polymers (Basel) 2021 Apr 23;13(9). Epub 2021 Apr 23.

Departamento de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad de Sonora, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

Nanoparticles based on chitosan modified with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) were synthetized by nanoprecipitation (EGCG-g-chitosan-P). Chitosan was modified by free-radical-induced grafting, which was verified by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Furthermore, the morphology, particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of the nanoparticles were investigated. The grafting degree of EGCG, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of EGCG-g-chitosan-P were evaluated and compared with those of pure EGCG and chitosan nanoparticles (Chitosan-P). FTIR results confirmed the modification of the chitosan with EGCG. The EGCG-g-chitosan-P showed spherical shapes and smoother surfaces than those of Chitosan-P. EGCG content of the grafted chitosan nanoparticles was 330 μg/g. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of EGCG-g-chitosan-P (15.6 μg/mL) was lower than Chitosan-P (31.2 μg/mL) and EGCG (500 μg/mL) against Pseudomonas fluorescens ( < 0.05). Additionally, EGCG-g-chitosan-P and Chitosan-P presented higher Staphylococcus aureus growth inhibition (100%) than EGCG at the lowest concentration tested. The nanoparticles produced an increase of ROS ( < 0.05) in both bacterial species assayed. Furthermore, EGCG-g-chitosan-P exhibited higher antioxidant activity than that of Chitosan-P ( < 0.05) in 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethyl-benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) and ferric-reducing antioxidant power assays. Based on the above results, EGCG-g-chitosan-P shows the potential for food packaging and biomedical applications.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym13091375DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8122830PMC
April 2021

Persistence of the antifungal capacity of a fraction of plant against after continuous exposure.

Indian J Microbiol 2020 Dec 27;60(4):458-467. Epub 2020 May 27.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Hermosillo, Sonora Mexico.

This study aimed to determine the ability of in developing mechanisms to counteract the antifungal effect of a fraction from plant extract (JmAF), as well as the morphological and physiological changes that occur during its exposure. The fungus was exposed to JmAF during consecutive periods. A culture sample was taken weekly to determine radial growth, spore germination and size, and fungal β-1,3-glucanase activity. The results showed that, in the beginning, the radial growth decreased by 85.8%, and spore germination was delayed. As the exposure continued, the fungus showed a recovery, to some extent, in its original characteristics. However, the radial growth of the fungus continued to be inhibited (42.9%) throughout the experiment (7 weeks). The β-1,3-glucanase activity also was inhibited by 36.4% during the first week of exposure to JmAF. However, the activity was recovered after 7 weeks of exposure.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12088-020-00887-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7539240PMC
December 2020

Phytotoxicity, cytotoxicity, and in vivo antifungal efficacy of chitosan nanobiocomposites on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2021 Jan 9;28(3):3051-3065. Epub 2020 Sep 9.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Microbiology and Mycotoxins Laboratory, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales S/N, Col. Centro, 83000, Hermosillo, Sonora, México.

Chitosan (CS) nanosystems have potential applications for the control of microorganisms in the medical, environmental, and agrifood fields. In vivo and in vitro assays of CS nanosystems have experienced increased activity due to improved physicochemical properties, biological activity, and reactivity. Hence, it is important to determine whether their application involves toxicological risks. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mutagenic, cytotoxic, phytotoxic, and in vivo antifungal activity of chitosan-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid nanobiocomposites (CS-PCA). The CS-PCA nanoparticles were synthesized by means of the nanoprecipitation technique with a size and ζ-potential of 502 ± 72 nm and + 54.7 ± 15.0 mV, respectively. According to the Ames test, no evidence of mutagenic activity was observed in Salmonella typhimurium strains. The cytotoxic assay showed that the incorporation of PCA into the CS matrix increased the toxic effect on ARPE-19 cells. However, fluorescence microscopy of ARPE-19 cells did not reveal morphostructural changes allusive to cell injury. CS-PCA exhibited strong phytotoxicity on lettuce seeds and the complete inhibition of seed development. The antifungal assay demonstrated that the CS-PCA delayed Aspergillus niger infection in tomato fruit until day 3; however, its use for the pre-treatment of seeds might exert adverse effects on plant development.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-10716-0DOI Listing
January 2021

Proteomic analysis of the inhibitory effect of the butanolic fraction of on .

Can J Microbiol 2020 Oct 14;66(10):535-548. Epub 2020 May 14.

CONACYT-Centro de Investigación en Alimentación y Desarrollo, A.C., Carretera Gustavo Enrique Astiazarán Rosas No. 46, Colonia La Victoria, C.P. 83304, Hermosillo, Sonora, México.

, a plant native to northwestern Mexico, has an inhibitory effect against phytopathogenic fungi. Previous studies have shown that the butanolic extract of causes retardation and atrophy in mycelial growth of . However, the action mechanism of this extract is unknown. We used a proteomics approach to understand the inhibitory effect of butanolic extract, based on differential protein accumulation in . Proteins were extracted from cultured in Czapek broth with and without 202.12 μg/mL (IC) of butanolic extract of . Thirty-eight protein spots showing statistically significant changes (ANOVA, < 0.01) and at least a 2-fold change in abundance between experimental conditions were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Identified proteins were grouped into different biological processes according to Gene Ontology, among them were amino acid metabolism, protein folding and stabilization, protein degradation, protein transport, carbohydrate metabolism, oxidative stress response, and miscellaneous. This work is the first report of changes in the proteomic profile of exposed to the extract. This information provides new insights into the inhibitory mechanism of the extract and represents a starting point for dissection of the fungal response against the extract components.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1139/cjm-2020-0127DOI Listing
October 2020

Biosorption of copper by immobilized biomass of Aspergillus australensis. Effect of metal on the viability, cellular components, polyhydroxyalkanoates production, and oxidative stress.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020 Aug 13;27(23):28545-28560. Epub 2020 Feb 13.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Microbiology and Micotoxins Laboratory, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales S/N, Col. Centro, Sonora, C.P., 83000, Hermosillo, Mexico.

Heavy metals are toxic especially when they are introduced into the environment due to anthropogenic activities such as metallurgy, mining, and tanning. Removing these pollutants has become a worldwide concern since they cannot be degraded into nontoxic forms causing extended effects in the ecosystems. The use of an Aspergillus australensis was evaluated in order to remove Cu from simulated wastewater. The fungus was isolated from river sludges contaminated with heavy metals and was first evaluated for the determination of Cu tolerance levels. Microscopic fluorescence analysis was carried out to determine the effect of Cu presence on the viability, cellular components, polyhydroxyalkanoates production, and oxidative stress of the fungus, as a response to the stress caused by exposure to metal. In order to achieve copper removal, the A. australensis biomass was produced using batch cultures, and the mycelium was immobilized on a textile media in order to compare the copper-removal efficiency of live or dead biomass. The optimal values of pH and temperature for biomass production were established by using a surface response analysis. Live immobilized biomass was capable of removing Cu from 1.54 ± 0.19 to 2.66 ± 0.26 mg of copper/ g of dry biomass, while values of 1.93 ± 0.03 to 2.36 ± 0.29 mg of copper/g of dry biomass were observed when dead biomass was used. As was expected, copper removal using biomass varied depending on the pH and temperature used.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-020-07747-yDOI Listing
August 2020

Inhibition of the antioxidant activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase from exposed to a antifungal fraction.

J Environ Sci Health B 2019 30;54(8):647-654. Epub 2019 May 30.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora , Hermosillo , Sonora , México.

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an antifungal fraction obtained from plant (JmAF) in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the activity of the catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes from , as well as their influence in the viability of the fungus spores. The compounds present in the JmAF were determined by gas chromatography/quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC/QTOF-MS). The effect of the exposition to JmAF on the generation of ROS, as well as in the CAT and SOD activities in , was determined. The main compounds detected were γ-sitosterol, stephamiersine, betulinol and oleic acid. JmAF showed very high ability in inhibiting the spore viability of , and their capacity to cause oxidative stress by induction of ROS production. JmAF induced the highest ROS concentration and also inhibited CAT and SOD activities. The results obtained in this study indicate that JmAF is worthy of being considered for the fight against phytopathogenic fungi.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03601234.2019.1622978DOI Listing
November 2019

Toxicological Assessment of Cross-Linked Beads of Chitosan-Alginate and Biomass, with Efficiency as Biosorbent for Copper Removal.

Polymers (Basel) 2019 Jan 30;11(2). Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Microbiology and Micotoxins Laboratory, Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, C.P. 83000, México.

Sorbent materials of biological origin are considered as an alternative to the use of traditional methods in order to remove heavy metals. Interest in using these materials has increased over the past years due to their low cost and friendliness to the environment. The objective of this study was to synthesize and characterize cross-linked beads made of chitosan, alginate, and mycelium of a copper-tolerant strain of . The acute toxicity of the biocomposite beads was assessed using brine shrimp nauplii and the phytotoxicity was determined using lettuce () and chili pepper 'Anaheim' () seeds. The biosorption capacity for copper removal in simulated wastewater was also evaluated. Results showed that the biosorbent obtained had a maximal adsorption of 26.1 mg of Cu per g of biocomposite, and removal efficiency was around 79%. The toxicity of simulated residual water after treatment with the biocomposite showed low toxicity toward seeds, which was highly dependent on the residual copper concentration. The toxicity of the biocomposite beads to was considered medium depending on the amount of the biocomposite, which was attributed to low pH. Biocomposite shows promise as biosorbent for the removal process of heavy metals.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/polym11020222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6419072PMC
January 2019

Synthesis of chitosan biocomposites loaded with pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid and assessment of their antifungal activity against Aspergillus niger.

Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 2019 Apr 12;103(7):2985-3000. Epub 2019 Feb 12.

Microbiology and Micotoxins Laboratory, Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales S/N, Col. Centro, 83000, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

A wide variety of chitosan (CS) biomaterials have been loaded with different antimicrobial agents to improve the activity of CS against phytopathogenic fungi. Recently, the antimicrobial activity of 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid (PCA) has been reported as a secondary metabolite of Streptomyces griseus, which was identified as the main bioactive compound in the biological control. However, it is sensitive to light and its activity against filamentous fungi has not yet been reported. The aim of the present research work was to evaluate the biological activity of CS-PCA biocomposites for the control of Aspergillus niger. CS-PCA biocomposites were obtained through nanoprecipitation. In vitro antifungal activity was determined by viability assay, spore germination, morphometric analysis of spores and hyphae, and the analysis of cellular components by fluorescence microscopy. CS-PCA showed an average size and Z potential of 502 ± 72 nm and + 54.7 ± 15 mV, respectively. Micrographs demonstrated well-distributed biocomposites with an apparently spherical shape. A new signal at 1473 cm in the FT-IR spectrum of the CS-PCA biocomposite was observed, confirming the presence of PCA in the composition of the CS-PCA nanosystem. CS-PCA biocomposites reduced the spores' viability by up to 58%. Effects on fungi morphometry, observed as an increase in the spores' average diameter, swelling, distortion, and an increase in the branching of hyphae, were observed. Fluorescence analysis showed oxidative stress and membrane and cell wall damage, mainly at early growth stages. The inhibitory effect against CS-resistant fungi, such as A. niger, opens a door for the control of CS-sensitive fungi.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-019-09670-wDOI Listing
April 2019

Effect of pepper tree () essential oil-loaded chitosan bio-nanocomposites on postharvest control of and quality evaluations in avocado () cv. Hass.

Food Sci Biotechnol 2018 Dec 12;27(6):1871-1875. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Tecnológico Nacional de México/I.T. Tepic, Tecnológico 2595, 63175 Tepic, Nayarit Mexico.

Preventive and curative activity of postharvest treatments with chitosan nanoparticles (CS) and chitosan biocomposites loaded with pepper tree essential oil (CS-PEO) against anthracnose were evaluated on Avocado () cv. Hass artificially inoculated in rind wounds. After 10 days of storage significant preventive and curative activity against was observed with the absence of internal damage by applying CS and CS-PEO. Quality parameters like water losses and firmness changes were assessed on fruit treated. CS and CS-PEO were effective to reduce water losses and firmness losses.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10068-018-0410-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6233389PMC
December 2018

Activity of chitosan-lysozyme nanoparticles on the growth, membrane integrity, and β-1,3-glucanase production by .

3 Biotech 2017 Oct 9;7(5):279. Epub 2017 Aug 9.

Laboratorio de Microbiología y Micotoxinas, Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Col. Centro, 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora Mexico.

Synthesis of nanocomposites from antimicrobial biopolymers such as chitosan (CS) and lysozyme (LZ) is an important and promising area in bionanotechnology. Chitosan-lysozyme (CS-LZ) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by the nanoprecipitation method, using commercial chitosan of 153 kDa. TEM and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis were carried out to evaluate the morphology, size, dispersion, and Z potential. Association efficiency of lysozyme was determined using Coomassie blue assay. The antifungal activity of NPs against was evaluated through cell viability (XTT), germination and morphometry of spores, and reducing sugars production; the effects on membrane integrity and cell wall were also analyzed. NPs' size were found in the range of 13.4 and 11.8 nm for CS-LZ and CS NPs, respectively, and high Z potential value was observed in both NPs. Also, high association of lysozyme was presented in the CS matrix. With respect to the biological responses, CS-LZ NPs reduced the viability of and a strong inhibitory effect on the germination of spores (100% of inhibition) was observed at 24 h in in vitro assays. CS-LZ and CS NPs affected the membrane integrity and the cell wall of spores of fungi with respect to control, which is consistent with the low amount of reducing sugars detected. CS-LZ NPs prepared by nanoprecipitation promise to be a viable and safe alternative for use in biological systems, with a possible low or null impact to humans and biota. However, the potential benefits and the environmental and health implications of NPs need to be globally discussed due to its possible negative effects.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13205-017-0913-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5549029PMC
October 2017

Preparation and Characterization of Extruded Composites Based on Polypropylene and Chitosan Compatibilized with Polypropylene-Graft-Maleic Anhydride.

Materials (Basel) 2017 Jan 25;10(2). Epub 2017 Jan 25.

Laboratorio de Envases, CTAOV, Centro de Investigación en Alimentos y Desarrollo A.C, Hermosillo 83304, Sonora, Mexico.

The preparation of composites of synthetic and natural polymers represent an interesting option to combine properties; in this manner, polypropylene and chitosan extruded films using a different proportion of components and polypropylene-graft-maleic anhydride (PPgMA) as compatibilizer were prepared. The effect of the content of the biopolymer in the polypropylene (PP) matrix, the addition of compatibilizer, and the particle size on the properties of the composites was analyzed using characterization by fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), tensile strength, and contact angle, finding that in general, the addition of the compatibilizer and reducing the particle size of the chitosan, favored the physicochemical and morphological properties of the films.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ma10020105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5459115PMC
January 2017

Functionalization of chitosan by a free radical reaction: Characterization, antioxidant and antibacterial potential.

Carbohydr Polym 2017 Jan 18;155:117-127. Epub 2016 Aug 18.

Departamento de Ciencias Químico Biológicas, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, México. Electronic address:

Chitosan was functionalized with epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) by a free radical-induced grafting procedure, which was carried out by a redox pair (ascorbic acid/hydrogen peroxide) as the radical initiator. The successful preparation of EGCG grafted-chitosan was verified by spectroscopic (UV, FTIR and XPS) and thermal (DSC and TGA) analyses. The degree of grafting of phenolic compounds onto the chitosan was determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu procedure. Additionally, the biological activities (antioxidant and antibacterial) of pure EGCG, blank chitosan and EGCG grafted-chitosan were evaluated. The spectroscopic and thermal results indicate chitosan functionalization with EGCG; the EGCG content was 25.8mg/g of EGCG grafted-chitosan. The antibacterial activity of the EGCG grafted-chitosan was increased compared to pure EGCG or blank chitosan against S. aureus and Pseudomonas sp. (p<0.05). Additionally, EGCG grafted-chitosan showed higher antioxidant activity than blank chitosan. These results indicate that EGCG grafted-chitosan might be useful in active food packaging.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.2016.08.056DOI Listing
January 2017

Potentiation of antifungal effect of a mixture of two antifungal fractions obtained from Baccharis glutinosa and Jacquinia macrocarpa plants.

J Environ Sci Health B 2016 Nov 6;51(11):760-8. Epub 2016 Jul 6.

a Department of Food Science Research and Graduate Studies , University of Sonora , Hermosillo , Sonora , Mexico.

The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of mixtures of antifungal fractions extracted from Baccharis glutinosa and Jacquinia macrocarpa plants on the development of the filamentous fungi Aspergillus flavus and Fusarium verticillioides. The minimal inhibitory concentration that inhibited 50% of growth (MIC50) of each plant antifungal fraction was determined from the percentage radial growth inhibition of both fungi. Binomial mixtures made with both plant fractions were used at their MIC50 to determine the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration index (FIC index) for each fungus in order to evaluate their synergistic effect. Each synergistic mixture was analyzed in their effect on spore germination, spore size, spore viability, mitotic divisions, hyphal diameter and length, and number of septa per hypha. Some antifungal mixtures, even at low concentrations, showed higher antifungal effect than those of the individual antifungal fraction. The FIC indices of mixtures that showed the highest antifungal activity against A. flavus and F. verticillioides were 0.5272 and 0.4577, respectively, indicating a synergistic effect against both fungi. Only 12% and 8% of the spores of A. flavus and F. verticillioides, respectively, treated with the synergistic mixtures, were able to germinate, although their viability was not affected. An increase in the number of septa per hypha of both fungi was observed. The results indicated that the synergistic mixtures strongly affected the fungal growth even at lower concentrations than those of the individual plant fractions.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03601234.2016.1198641DOI Listing
November 2016

Antimutagenic Compounds of White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei): Isolation and Structural Elucidation.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2016 24;2016:8148215. Epub 2016 Feb 24.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 1658, 83000 Hermosillo, SON, Mexico.

According to the World Health Organization, cancer is the main cause of mortality worldwide; thus, the search of chemopreventive compounds to prevent the disease has become a priority. White shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) has been reported as a source of compounds with chemopreventive activities. In this study, shrimp lipids were extracted and then fractionated in order to isolate those compounds responsible for the antimutagenic activity. The antimutagenic activity was assessed by the inhibition of the mutagenic effect of aflatoxin B1 on TA98 and TA100 Salmonella tester strains using the Ames test. Methanolic fraction was responsible for the highest antimutagenic activity (95.6 and 95.9% for TA98 and TA100, resp.) and was further separated into fifteen different subfractions (M1-M15). Fraction M8 exerted the highest inhibition of AFB1 mutation (96.5 and 101.6% for TA98 and TA100, resp.) and, after further fractionation, four subfractions M8a, M8b, M8c, and M8d were obtained. Data from (1)H and (13)C NMR, and mass spectrometry analysis of fraction M8a (the one with the highest antimutagenic activity), suggest that the compound responsible for its antimutagenicity is an apocarotenoid.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8148215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4783554PMC
March 2016

Micro- and nanoparticles by electrospray: advances and applications in foods.

J Agric Food Chem 2015 May 12;63(19):4699-707. Epub 2015 May 12.

†Department of Food Research and Graduate Program (DIPA), University of Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

Micro- and nanotechnology are tools being used strongly in the area of food technology. The electrospray technique is booming because of its importance in developing micro- and nanoparticles containing an active ingredient as bioactive compounds, enhancing molecules of flavors, odors, and packaging coatings, and developing polymers that are obtained from food (proteins, carbohydrates), as chitosan, alginate, gelatin, agar, starch, or gluten. The electrospray technique compared to conventional techniques such as nanoprecipitation, emulsion-diffusion, double-emulsification, and layer by layer provides greater advantages to develop micro- and nanoparticles because it is simple, low cost, uses a low amount of solvents, and products are obtained in one step. This technique could also be applied in the agrifood sector for the preparation of controlled and/or prolonged release systems of fertilizer or agrochemicals, for which more research must be conducted.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jafc.5b01403DOI Listing
May 2015

Isolation and structural elucidation of antiproliferative compounds of lipidic fractions from white shrimp muscle (Litopenaeus vannamei).

Int J Mol Sci 2014 Dec 17;15(12):23555-70. Epub 2014 Dec 17.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 1658, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000, Mexico.

Shrimp is one of the most popular seafood items worldwide, and has been reported as a source of chemopreventive compounds. In this study, shrimp lipids were separated by solvent partition and further fractionated by semi-preparative RP-HPLC and finally by open column chromatography in order to obtain isolated antiproliferative compounds. Antiproliferative activity was assessed by inhibition of M12.C3.F6 murine cell growth using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide) assay. The methanolic fraction showed the highest antiproliferative activity; this fraction was separated into 15 different sub-fractions (M1-M15). Fractions M8, M9, M10, M12, and M13 were antiproliferative at 100 µg/mL and they were further tested at lower concentrations. Fractions M12 and M13 exerted the highest growth inhibition with an IC50 of 19.5 ± 8.6 and 34.9 ± 7.3 µg/mL, respectively. Fraction M12 was further fractionated in three sub-fractions M12a, M12b, and M12c. Fraction M12a was identified as di-ethyl-hexyl-phthalate, fraction M12b as a triglyceride substituted by at least two fatty acids (predominantly oleic acid accompanied with eicosapentaenoic acid) and fraction M12c as another triglyceride substituted with eicosapentaenoic acid and saturated fatty acids. Bioactive triglyceride contained in M12c exerted the highest antiproliferative activity with an IC50 of 11.33 ± 5.6 µg/mL. Biological activity in shrimp had been previously attributed to astaxanthin; this study demonstrated that polyunsaturated fatty acids are the main compounds responsible for antiproliferative activity.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms151223555DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4284780PMC
December 2014

Shrimp lipids: a source of cancer chemopreventive compounds.

Mar Drugs 2013 Oct 16;11(10):3926-50. Epub 2013 Oct 16.

Department of Research and Food Science Graduate Program, University of Sonora, Apartado Postal 1658, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000, Mexico.

Shrimp is one of the most popular seafoods worldwide, and its lipids have been studied for biological activity in both, muscle and exoskeleton. Free fatty acids, triglycerides, carotenoids, and other lipids integrate this fraction, and some of these compounds have been reported with cancer chemopreventive activities. Carotenoids and polyunsaturated fatty acids have been extensively studied for chemopreventive properties, in both in vivo and in vitro studies. Their mechanisms of action depend on the lipid chemical structure and include antioxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-mutagenic, and anti-inflammatory activities, among others. The purpose of this review is to lay groundwork for future research about the properties of the lipid fraction of shrimp.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md11103926DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3826143PMC
October 2013

Controlled release matrices and micro/nanoparticles of chitosan with antimicrobial potential: development of new strategies for microbial control in agriculture.

J Sci Food Agric 2013 May 19;93(7):1525-36. Epub 2013 Mar 19.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, Col. Centro, Hermosillo, Sonora, CP 83000, Mexico.

The control of micro-organisms responsible for pre- and postharvest diseases of agricultural products, mainly viruses and fungi, is a problem that remains unresolved, together with the environmental impact of the excessive use of chemicals to tackle this problem. Current efforts are focused on the search for efficient alternatives for microbial control that will not result in damage to the environment or an imbalance in the existing biota. One alternative is the use of natural antimicrobial compounds such as chitosan, a linear cationic biopolymer, which is biodegradable, biocompatible and non-toxic, has filmogenic properties and is capable of forming matrices for the transport of active substances. The study of chitosan has attracted great interest owing to its ability to form complexes or matrices for the controlled release of active compounds such as micro- and nanoparticles, which, together with the biological properties of chitosan, has allowed a major breakthrough in the pharmaceutical and biomedical industries. Another important field of study is the development of chitosan-based matrices for the controlled release of active compounds in areas such as agriculture and food for the control of viruses, bacteria and fungi, which is one of the least exploited areas and holds much promise for future research.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jsfa.6060DOI Listing
May 2013

Bioactive Lipidic Extracts from Octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus): Antimutagenicity and Antiproliferative Studies.

Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2013 16;2013:273582. Epub 2013 Jan 16.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 1658, 83000 Hermosillo, SON, Mexico.

Fractions from an organic extract from fresh octopus (Paraoctopus limaculatus) were studied for biological activities such as antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma), respectively. A chloroform extract obtained from octopus tentacles was sequentially fractionated using thin layer chromatography (TLC), and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Organic extract reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxin B(1) showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. Based on the results obtained, the isolated fractions obtained from octopus contain compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB(1) and proliferation of cancer cell lines.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/273582DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3562661PMC
February 2013

Antimutagenicity and antiproliferative studies of lipidic extracts from white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei).

Mar Drugs 2010 Nov 8;8(11):2795-809. Epub 2010 Nov 8.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Apartado Postal 1658, Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

An organic extract from fresh shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) was studied for antimutagenic and antiproliferative properties using Salmonella typhimurium tester strains TA98 and TA100 with metabolic activation (S9) and a cancer cell line (B-cell lymphoma), respectively. Shrimp extract was sequentially fractionated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and each fraction was tested for antimutagenic and antiproliferative activities. Crude organic extracts obtained from shrimp reduced the number of revertants caused by aflatoxina B(1), showing a dose-response type of relationship. Sequential TLC fractionation of the active extracts produced several antimutagenic and/or antiproliferative fractions. These results suggested that the lipid fraction of the tested species contained compounds with chemoprotective properties that reduce the mutagenicity of AFB(1) and proliferation of a cancer cell line.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/md8112795DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2996177PMC
November 2010

Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) mantle collagen: extraction, characterization, and potential application in the preparation of chitosan-collagen biofilms.

Bioresour Technol 2010 Jun 25;101(11):4212-9. Epub 2010 Jan 25.

Departamento de Investigación y Posgrado en Alimentos, Universidad de Sonora, Blvd. Luis Encinas y Rosales s/n, 83000, Col. Centro. Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico.

Collagen-based biomaterials have been widely used due to its binding capabilities. However the properties and potential use of new collagen sources are still under investigation. Fish by-products are an excellent source of collagen. Thus, acid-soluble collagen (ASC) was extracted, and biochemical and physicochemically characterized from one under-utilized specie, jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas). In addition, commercial chitosan (95-50%)-ASC (5-50%) blend films were successfully prepared by casting, and characterized by infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The molecular masses of the ASC subunits were about 190kDa, 110kDa, and 97kDa, the content of proline and hydroxyproline was 10.9% and 2.8%, respectively. The FT-IR and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra ((1)H NMR) confirmed collagen peptidic crosslinks, and one endothermic peak was found at 119 degrees C. The FT-IR spectrum showed that chitosan and ASC remain linked into the films mainly due to hydrogen bonding. The 85:15 (chitosan:ASC) ratio was selected for its thermal and mechanical analyses. The thermograms of this film indicated the presence of two peaks, one at 87-98 degrees C and the other at 142-182 degrees C. The chitosan:ASC blend produced a transparent and brittle film, with high percentage of elongation at break, and low tensile strength in comparison to chitosan films. D. gigas mantle might be useful as a new source of plasticizer agent in the preparation of biofilms in composites with chitosan.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2010.01.008DOI Listing
June 2010
-->