Publications by authors named "Marianne Brandt"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Efficacy and tolerability of a detergent and care component for rosacea patients: A split-face, vehicle-controlled, randomized trial.

J Cosmet Dermatol 2021 Apr 7. Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Department of Dermatology and Allergy, University Hospital of Munich, LMU, Munich, Germany.

Background: The treatment of facial erythema and subjective symptoms of rosacea patients remains challenging in clinical practice. Cosmeceuticals, care components containing active ingredients such as phytochemicals, play a growing role in treatment plans. However, well-designed studies on their efficacy and limitations are widely missing.

Objective: A foam and a cream for rosacea patients were assessed based on objective and subjective methodology. The tolerability of skin and eyes was evaluated.

Methods: A randomized, double-blinded, split-face, and vehicle-controlled trial was conducted. At baseline and after four weeks of product use, dermatological and ophthalmological investigations were performed, employing image analysis of facial erythema, clinical assessments, and questionnaires.

Results: The patient cohort comprised 33 females with persistent facial erythema due to rosacea. No significant differences were found between the vehicle and the verum. According to the analysis of facial erythema, a "less pronounced" or "much less pronounced" appearance was seen in two thirds of patients comparing V1 to V0. Especially, the dryness of the skin improved by the use of the vehicle and the verum. Adverse subjective skin sensations decreased by 61.3% for the verum side and by 58.6% for the vehicle side. Subjective and objective analysis of ocular manifestation differed, with subjective manifestations reported more frequently, thus highlighting underdiagnosis of ocular rosacea.

Conclusions: As no clear differences between the verum and the vehicle were found, an optimal skin care regime itself seems to have a superior effect in the relief of facial erythema and foremost of subjective symptoms, rather than certain active ingredients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jocd.14130DOI Listing
April 2021

Targeted dry skin treatment using a multifunctional topical moisturizer.

Int J Cosmet Sci 2021 Apr 3;43(2):191-200. Epub 2021 Jan 3.

Bayer Healthcare SAS, Gaillard, France.

Objective: The development of dry skin is a complex process, with a wide variety of factors each playing different roles in its evolution. Given this, it is important when designing a formulation to tackle dry skin that these varied aspects of skin behaviour are addressed. Presented here are the results of a 3-week moisturization study carried out on dry legs. A wide range of traditional and more recently developed biophysical measurement methods have been combined with visual assessment of skin condition to enable multiple aspects of skin function to be determined. The observed changes in the skin are discussed in terms of the ingredients used in the moisturizing formulation.

Methods: A range of novel and traditional skin assessment methods and techniques were used to assess the effects of an oil in water-based moisturizing product compared to an untreated site during a 3-week in vivo study on dry lower leg skin.

Results: Statistically significant improvements were observed in a range of skin parameters as a result of product usage. Skin hydration assessed using Corneometer®, Epsilon® and visual dry skin grading all increased after 3 weeks of use. Skin barrier function measured using transepidermal water loss also improved. Levels of cholesterol, free fatty acids and Ceramide NH increased, as well as the average length of the stratum corneum (SC) lipid lamella bilayers, and the ratio of lipid to protein increased (measured using Lipbarvis® and in vivo Confocal Raman Spectroscopy). Increases in the levels of Ceramide EOS and NP were also observed, along with an improvement in corneocyte maturity, although these were not statistically significant.

Conclusions: Using a variety of traditional and novel skin assessment techniques, a wide range of factors associated with the evolution of dry skin have been assessed upon treatment with a new topical moisturizer. Product usage resulted in significant improvements to skin hydration and barrier function, the levels and morphology of SC barrier lipids, and overall epidermal differentiation. As a result there was a significant reduction in the characteristics associated with the development of dry skin after use of the test product.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ics.12680DOI Listing
April 2021

Non-invasive evaluation techniques to quantify the efficacy of cosmetic anti-cellulite products.

Skin Res Technol 2008 Aug;14(3):336-46

proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research GmbH, Schenefeld, Germany.

Background: The majority of women suffer from the unattractive sight of dimpling skin on the thighs and buttocks, globally known as cellulite. Cellulite can be regarded as the most investigated non-disease, because, from the cosmetic viewpoint, most women desire a reduction in cellulite severity. Despite investigations made, cellulite is still not well understood at the cellular level, which leads to controversy regarding the investigative methods for cellulite reduction as well as the development of products to treat cellulite skin.

Objective: The aim of our work was to improve the set up of macrophotography for making images of dimpled skin and to automatize image analysis of 20 MHz ultrasound imaging - these two methods being just two of a variety of available methods for investigating cellulite skin.

Methods: Macrophotography was standardized on the aspects of volunteer's positioning, skin illumination, background used, and camera position. It was performed before, during and after a 3-month-treatment of a cosmetic product. Scoring assessments of the generated images were made by the volunteers themselves as well as by six trained experts. Ultrasound imaging was performed at the baseline visit in order to correlate the newly developed analysis with the visually rated cellulite score. A second study is also presented showing a variety of parameters that can be used for cosmetic testing of cellulite products: skin firmness, blood circulation and circumferential thigh measurements.

Results: Standardization of macrophotography minimized differences in image features between assessment times, therefore, enabling follow-up rating assessments of the images. A custom-made rating program simplified the scoring procedure by presenting images as blind and randomized, and by implementing computer-based analysis using an online rating scale. Volunteers and experts scored significant improvement of skin appearance over the course of a 3-month cosmetic treatment. Image analysis of ultrasound imaging was automatized, and a modification of the commonly known roughness parameter Ra was implemented to characterize cellulite severity. Comparison with the visually rated cellulite score showed an existing correlation between the score and the modified parameter Ra(m). Further parameters investigated in an exemplary study, as mentioned above, demonstrated a significant improvement of skin appearance after treatment with a cosmetic product.

Conclusions: Macrophotography and ultrasound imaging can be regarded as important tools for determining and quantifying the aspects of cellulite. With a gold standard missing for investigating cellulite severity, these two methods may not determine cellulite at the cellular level, but they do characterize the skin appearance so typical for cellulite. Combined with a variety of other methods, macrophotography and ultrasound imaging can very well define cellulite-reducing efficacy from the cosmetic point of view.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0846.2008.00300.xDOI Listing
August 2008

Influence of climatic conditions on antiperspirant efficacy determined at different test areas.

Skin Res Technol 2008 May;14(2):213-9

proDERM Institute for Applied Dermatological Research GmbH, Schenefeld, Germany.

Background: The efficacy of antiperspirants is a current topic among the developers of cosmetic products. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the US market, efficacy testing performed in the axilla of human volunteers is mandatory. Another method is yet available, which enables comparison of more than one antiperspirant formula in a single study by performing the test on the backs of volunteers. However, how reproducible are these methods, comparing between the back and axilla? Do they differ as a result of seasonal variation? Is a correlation between the results of the two methods possible?

Methods: To answer these questions, the antiperspirant efficacy of aluminium chlorohydrate (ACH) aqueous solutions was investigated in the axilla and on the backs of volunteers, in four separate clinical studies covering cold and warm seasons. Four days of product application were followed by thermal sweat induction on the fifth day, using a sauna. The amount of sweat recovered by weighing cotton pads before and after sweat induction was used to calculate sweat reduction. Testing in the axilla and on the back was performed on the same volunteers simultaneously to achieve the best comparable data. For this reason, the FDA guideline was slightly modified to thermal stimulation in a sauna instead of in a hot room.

Results: Increasing concentrations of ACH in aqueous solutions on the backs of volunteers showed a saturation for 8% ACH with a sweat reduction of approximately 50%. The antiperspirant efficacy of solutions containing 4%, 8% or 12% ACH was repeatedly found at the same levels, when tested on the backs during summer, autumn and winter time. Axilla tests, with an 8% ACH aqueous solution, showed strongly varying results for summer and winter time, represented by sweat reduction values of -2% to 25%. As an assumption, these high variations might result from reduced gel formation in cold seasons due to low humidity in the axillae during the application phase. On the back, this effect was avoided by applying occlusive foils after product application. To gain further insight, a study, during which summer conditions were artificially simulated by thermal stimulation during the application phase, again showed decreased antiperspirant efficacy in the axilla for winter conditions with sweat reduction values of 2%, compared with 25% under simulated summer conditions.

Conclusion: These strongly varying values of sweat reduction in the axilla under summer and winter conditions make comparisons between antiperspirant products difficult and a statement about correlation between the two test sites back and axilla impossible. A standardization of the application phase, comparable to the simulated summer conditions described here, could be a solution to reduce the high variation of results in the axilla. Consequently, testing on the back is not only a more cost-effective method to investigate the antiperspirant efficacy of more than one formulation, but a reproducible method more independent of climatic influences during test implementation than the axilla test method. It could, therefore, be regarded as the method of choice for discriminating antiperspirant efficacy between several products during development of new antiperspirant formulations.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0846.2007.00282.xDOI Listing
May 2008
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