Publications by authors named "Mariana M Santoni"

3 Publications

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CYP712K4 Catalyzes the C-29 Oxidation of Friedelin in the Maytenus ilicifolia Quinone Methide Triterpenoid Biosynthesis Pathway.

Plant Cell Physiol 2019 Nov;60(11):2510-2522

Department of Plant Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

The native Brazilian plant Maytenus ilicifolia accumulates a set of quinone methide triterpenoids with important pharmacological properties, of which maytenin, pristimerin and celastrol accumulate exclusively in the root bark of this medicinal plant. The first committed step in the quinone methide triterpenoid biosynthesis is the cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene to friedelin, catalyzed by the oxidosqualene cyclase friedelin synthase (FRS). In this study, we produced heterologous friedelin by the expression of M. ilicifolia FRS in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain engineered using CRISPR/Cas9. Furthermore, friedelin-producing N. benthamiana leaves and S. cerevisiae cells were used for the characterization of CYP712K4, a cytochrome P450 from M. ilicifolia that catalyzes the oxidation of friedelin at the C-29 position, leading to maytenoic acid, an intermediate of the quinone methide triterpenoid biosynthesis pathway. Maytenoic acid produced in N. benthamiana leaves was purified and its structure was confirmed using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance analysis. The three-step oxidation of friedelin to maytenoic acid by CYP712K4 can be considered as the second step of the quinone methide triterpenoid biosynthesis pathway, and may form the basis for further discovery of the pathway and heterologous production of friedelanes and ultimately quinone methide triterpenoids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/pcp/pcz144DOI Listing
November 2019

Determination of in vitro absorption in Caco-2 monolayers of anticancer Ru(II)-based complexes acting as dual human topoisomerase and PARP inhibitors.

Biometals 2019 02 30;32(1):89-100. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Center of Exact Sciences and Technology, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, SP, 13565-905, Brazil.

Due to their unique and versatile biochemical properties, ruthenium-based compounds have emerged as promising anticancer agents. Previous studies showed that three ruthenium(II) compounds: [Ru(pySH)(bipy)(dppb)]PF (1), [Ru(HSpym)(bipy)(dppb)]PF (2) and Ru[(SpymMe)(bipy)(dppb)]PF (3) presented anticancer properties higher than doxorubicin and cisplatin and acted as human topoisomerase IB (Topo I) inhibitors. Here, we focused our studies on in vitro intestinal permeability and anticancer mechanisms of these three complexes. Caco-2 permeation studies showed that 1 did not permeate the monolayer of intestinal cells, suggesting a lack of absorption on oral administration, while 2 and 3 permeated the cells after 60 and 120 min, respectively. Complexes 2 and 3 fully inhibited Topo II relaxation activity at 125 µM. In previously studies, 3 was the most potent inhibitor of Topo I, here, we concluded that it is a dual topoisomerase inhibitor. Moreover, it presented selectivity to cancer cells when evaluated by clonogenic assay. Thus, 3 was selected to gene expression assay front MDA-MB-231 cells from triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), which represents the highly aggressive subgroup of breast cancers with poor prognosis. The analyses revealed changes of 27 out of 84 sought target genes. PARP1 and PARP2 were 5.29 and 1.83 times down-regulated after treatment with 3, respectively. PARPs have been attractive antitumor drug targets, considering PARP inhibition could suppress DNA damage repair and sensitize tumor cells to DNA damage agents. Recent advances in DNA repair studies have shown that an approach that causes cell lethality using synthetic PARP-inhibiting drugs has produced promising results in TNBC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10534-018-0160-0DOI Listing
February 2019

The Combined Use of Proteomics and Transcriptomics Reveals a Complex Secondary Metabolite Network in Peperomia obtusifolia.

J Nat Prod 2017 05 19;80(5):1275-1286. Epub 2017 Apr 19.

Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp) , Araraquara, SP 14800-060, Brazil.

Peperomia obtusifolia, an ornamental plant from the Piperaceae family, accumulates a series of secondary metabolites with interesting biological properties. From a biosynthesis standpoint, this species produces several benzopyrans derived from orsellinic acid, which is a polyketide typically found in fungi. Additionally, the chiral benzopyrans were reported as racemic and/or as diastereomeric mixtures, which raises questions about the level of enzymatic control in the cyclization step for the formation of the 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran moiety. Therefore, this article describes the use of shotgun proteomic and transcriptome studies as well as phytochemical profiling for the characterization of the main biosynthesis pathways active in P. obtusifolia. This combined approach resulted in the identification of a series of proteins involved in its secondary metabolism, including tocopherol cyclase and prenyltransferases. The activity of these enzymes was supported by the phytochemical profiling performed in different organs of P. obtusifolia. However, the polyketide synthases possibly involved in the production of orsellinic acid could not be identified, suggesting that orsellinic acid may be produced by endophytes intimately associated with the plant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.jnatprod.6b00827DOI Listing
May 2017
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