Publications by authors named "Mariana Cunha Artilheiro"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Motor Compensation Strategies for Reduced Upper Limb Function Among Individuals With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

Percept Mot Skills 2021 Mar 16:31512521998278. Epub 2021 Mar 16.

Departamento de Ciências do Movimento Humano, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brasil.

The purpose of this longitudinal study was to identify and verify the compensatory motor strategies for upper limb functioning of individuals with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). We evaluated 32 patients diagnosed with DMD (aged 6-19 years) for cognitive and motor functioning using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Vignos Scale Jebsen Taylor Test (JTT) and Functional Skill Scale (FSS) at baseline testing and over retest intervals of six and 12 months. We used the MMSE to screen participants for capacity to engage in the research, and we analyzed absolute and percentile changes in the frequency distribution of motor strategies participants used on each JTT subtest. We also used analysis of variance with repeated measures and Bonferroni post-hoc testing of multiple comparisons to identify disease progression through FSS scores. We observed an increased frequency of compensatory motor strategies over six months. We recommend the associated use of the JTT and FSS to assess patients with DMD, since we observed worsened movement quality over a time interval of six months even while essential motor competence was maintained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0031512521998278DOI Listing
March 2021

Interactive Video Gaming Improves Functional Balance in Poststroke Individuals: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

Eval Health Prof 2020 03 22;43(1):23-32. Epub 2018 Jul 22.

Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of interactive video games on functional balance and mobility in poststroke individuals. The Health Science databases accessed included Medline via PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and PEDro. The inclusion criteria were as follows: clinical studies evaluating the use of interactive video games as a treatment to improve functional balance and mobility in individuals poststroke and studies published in the Brazilian Portuguese, English, or Spanish language between 2005 and April 2016. PEDro Scale was used to analyze the methodological quality of the studies. The Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go Test (TUGT) data were evaluated using a meta-analysis, the publication bias was assessed by funnel plots, and the heterogeneity of the studies by statistic. Eleven studies were included in the final analysis. Functional balance improved in individuals treated using interactive video games (mean difference = 2.24, 95% confidence interval [0.45, 4.04], = .01), but no improvement was observed in mobility as measured by TUGT. The studies presented low heterogeneity (24%). The mean score on the PEDro Scale was 6.2 ± 1.9. Interactive video games were effective in improving functional balance but did not influence the mobility of individuals poststroke.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0163278718784998DOI Listing
March 2020

Reliability, validity and description of timed performance of the Jebsen-Taylor Test in patients with muscular dystrophies.

Braz J Phys Ther 2018 May - Jun;22(3):190-197. Epub 2017 Dec 8.

Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP), Departamento de Ciências do Movimento Humano, Santos, SP, Brazil.

Background: The Jebsen-Taylor Test evaluates upper limb function by measuring timed performance on everyday activities. The test is used to assess and monitor the progression of patients with Parkinson disease, cerebral palsy, stroke and brain injury.

Objectives: To analyze the reliability, internal consistency and validity of the Jebsen-Taylor Test in people with Muscular Dystrophy and to describe and classify upper limb timed performance of people with Muscular Dystrophy.

Methods: Fifty patients with Muscular Dystrophy were assessed. Non-dominant and dominant upper limb performances on the Jebsen-Taylor Test were filmed. Two raters evaluated timed performance for inter-rater reliability analysis. Test-retest reliability was investigated by using intraclass correlation coefficients. Internal consistency was assessed using the Cronbach alpha. Construct validity was conducted by comparing the Jebsen-Taylor Test with the Performance of Upper Limb.

Results: The internal consistency of Jebsen-Taylor Test was good (Cronbach's α=0.98). A very high inter-rater reliability (0.903-0.999), except for writing with an Intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.772-1.000. Strong correlations between the Jebsen-Taylor Test and the Performance of Upper Limb Module were found (rho=-0.712).

Conclusion: The Jebsen-Taylor Test is a reliable and valid measure of timed performance for people with Muscular Dystrophy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bjpt.2017.09.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5993958PMC
December 2018

Three-dimensional analysis of performance of an upper limb functional task among adults with dyskinetic cerebral palsy.

Gait Posture 2014 Mar 10;39(3):875-81. Epub 2013 Dec 10.

Department of Rehabilitation Science, Human Motion Analysis Laboratory, Universidade Nove de Julho, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address:

Patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy (DCP) experience considerable variability in their purposeful movements due to involuntary movements that contribute to functional impairment. Movement analyses can demonstrate how the movements involved in bringing a mug to the mouth are performed by patients with DCP. Sixteen adults with DCP (29.63±4.42 years) and eleven healthy adults (24.09±3.73 years) performed six consecutive movements of bringing a mug to the mouth using their dominant arm. The mug was placed at 75% of each subject's maximum reach. Kinematic data were captured by 10 cameras and processed using biomechanical software. Fifteen reflexive markers were placed on predetermined bony landmarks on the head, trunk and upper limbs. DCP adults required more time to perform the going (bringing the mug to the mouth), adjusting (simulating taking a drink) and returning (lowering the mug back to the table) phases, and their movements were less smooth than the controls, as indicated by the index of curvature, average jerk and number of movement units. The DCP adults took a longer time to complete the task than controls as indicated by the peak velocities, mean velocities and times to peak velocity. With respect to the angular parameters, DCP adults had a smaller range of motion for shoulder and elbow flexion and forearm pronation compared with the controls. The analysis of functional tasks represents an important measure for the evaluation of dyskinetic movements and permits the quantitative characterization of upper limb impairment in adults with DCP.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gaitpost.2013.11.022DOI Listing
March 2014