Publications by authors named "Mariah McMahon"

3 Publications

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Education and Outreach in Physical Sciences in Oncology.

Trends Cancer 2021 01 7;7(1):3-9. Epub 2020 Nov 7.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Department of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Department of Transplantation, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Center for Immunotherapeutic Transport Oncophysics, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX, USA. Electronic address:

Physical sciences are often overlooked in the field of cancer research. The Physical Sciences in Oncology Initiative was launched to integrate physics, mathematics, chemistry, and engineering with cancer research and clinical oncology through education, outreach, and collaboration. Here, we provide a framework for education and outreach in emerging transdisciplinary fields.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.trecan.2020.10.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7895467PMC
January 2021

Modeling distributed forces within cell adhesions of varying size on continuous substrates.

Cytoskeleton (Hoboken) 2019 11 6;76(11-12):571-585. Epub 2019 Nov 6.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Cell migration and traction are essential to many biological phenomena, and one of their key features is sensitivity to substrate stiffness, which biophysical models, such as the motor-clutch model and the cell migration simulator can predict and explain. However, these models have not accounted for the finite size of adhesions, the spatial distribution of forces within adhesions. Here, we derive an expression that relates varying adhesion radius ( R) and spatial distribution of force within an adhesion (described by s) to the effective substrate stiffness ( κ ), as a function of the Young's modulus of the substrate ( E ), which yields the relation, , for two-dimensional cell cultures. Experimentally, we found that a cone-shaped force distribution ( s = 1.05) can describe the observed displacements of hydrogels deformed by adherent U251 glioma cells. Also, we found that the experimentally observed adhesion radius increases linearly with the cell protrusion force, consistent with the predictions of the motor-clutch model with spatially distributed clutches. We also found that, theoretically, the influence of one protrusion on another through a continuous elastic environment is negligible. Overall, we conclude cells can potentially control their own interpretation of the mechanics of the environment by controlling adhesion size and spatial distribution of forces within an adhesion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/cm.21561DOI Listing
November 2019

Myosin IIA suppresses glioblastoma development in a mechanically sensitive manner.

Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 2019 07 24;116(31):15550-15559. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL 32224;

The ability of glioblastoma to disperse through the brain contributes to its lethality, and blocking this behavior has been an appealing therapeutic approach. Although a number of proinvasive signaling pathways are active in glioblastoma, many are redundant, so targeting one can be overcome by activating another. However, these pathways converge on nonredundant components of the cytoskeleton, and we have shown that inhibiting one of these-the myosin II family of cytoskeletal motors-blocks glioblastoma invasion even with simultaneous activation of multiple upstream promigratory pathways. Myosin IIA and IIB are the most prevalent isoforms of myosin II in glioblastoma, and we now show that codeleting these myosins markedly impairs tumorigenesis and significantly prolongs survival in a rodent model of this disease. However, while targeting just myosin IIA also impairs tumor invasion, it surprisingly increases tumor proliferation in a manner that depends on environmental mechanics. On soft surfaces myosin IIA deletion enhances ERK1/2 activity, while on stiff surfaces it enhances the activity of NFκB, not only in glioblastoma but in triple-negative breast carcinoma and normal keratinocytes as well. We conclude myosin IIA suppresses tumorigenesis in at least two ways that are modulated by the mechanics of the tumor and its stroma. Our results also suggest that inhibiting tumor invasion can enhance tumor proliferation and that effective therapy requires targeting cellular components that drive both proliferation and invasion simultaneously.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1902847116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6681735PMC
July 2019
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