Publications by authors named "Maria V Golubenko"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Carriers of mitochondrial DNA macrohaplogroup R colonized Eurasia and Australasia from a southeast Asia core area.

BMC Evol Biol 2017 05 23;17(1):115. Epub 2017 May 23.

Departamento de Genética, Facultad de Biología, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38271 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain.

Background: The colonization of Eurasia and Australasia by African modern humans has been explained, nearly unanimously, as the result of a quick southern coastal dispersal route through the Arabian Peninsula, the Indian subcontinent, and the Indochinese Peninsula, to reach Australia around 50 kya. The phylogeny and phylogeography of the major mitochondrial DNA Eurasian haplogroups M and N have played the main role in giving molecular genetics support to that scenario. However, using the same molecular tools, a northern route across central Asia has been invoked as an alternative that is more conciliatory with the fossil record of East Asia. Here, we assess as the Eurasian macrohaplogroup R fits in the northern path.

Results: Haplogroup U, with a founder age around 50 kya, is one of the oldest clades of macrohaplogroup R in western Asia. The main branches of U expanded in successive waves across West, Central and South Asia before the Last Glacial Maximum. All these dispersions had rather overlapping ranges. Some of them, as those of U6 and U3, reached North Africa. At the other end of Asia, in Wallacea, another branch of macrohaplogroup R, haplogroup P, also independently expanded in the area around 52 kya, in this case as isolated bursts geographically well structured, with autochthonous branches in Australia, New Guinea, and the Philippines.

Conclusions: Coeval independently dispersals around 50 kya of the West Asia haplogroup U and the Wallacea haplogroup P, points to a halfway core area in southeast Asia as the most probable centre of expansion of macrohaplogroup R, what fits in the phylogeographic pattern of its ancestor, macrohaplogroup N, for which a northern route and a southeast Asian origin has been already proposed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12862-017-0964-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5442693PMC
May 2017

Origin and spread of human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U7.

Sci Rep 2017 04 7;7:46044. Epub 2017 Apr 7.

Evolutionary Biology Group, Estonian Biocentre, Tartu 51010, Estonia.

Human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U is among the initial maternal founders in Southwest Asia and Europe and one that best indicates matrilineal genetic continuity between late Pleistocene hunter-gatherer groups and present-day populations of Europe. While most haplogroup U subclades are older than 30 thousand years, the comparatively recent coalescence time of the extant variation of haplogroup U7 (~16-19 thousand years ago) suggests that its current distribution is the consequence of more recent dispersal events, despite its wide geographical range across Europe, the Near East and South Asia. Here we report 267 new U7 mitogenomes that - analysed alongside 100 published ones - enable us to discern at least two distinct temporal phases of dispersal, both of which most likely emanated from the Near East. The earlier one began prior to the Holocene (~11.5 thousand years ago) towards South Asia, while the later dispersal took place more recently towards Mediterranean Europe during the Neolithic (~8 thousand years ago). These findings imply that the carriers of haplogroup U7 spread to South Asia and Europe before the suggested Bronze Age expansion of Indo-European languages from the Pontic-Caspian Steppe region.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep46044DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384202PMC
April 2017

Genomic structural variations for cardiovascular and metabolic comorbidity.

Sci Rep 2017 01 25;7:41268. Epub 2017 Jan 25.

Laboratory of Population Genetics, Research Institute of Medical Genetics, Tomsk National Research Medical Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Russia.

The objective of this study was to identify genes targeted by both copy number and copy-neutral changes in the right coronary arteries in the area of advanced atherosclerotic plaques and intact internal mammary arteries derived from the same individuals with comorbid coronary artery disease and metabolic syndrome. The artery samples from 10 patients were screened for genomic imbalances using array comparative genomic hybridization. Ninety high-confidence, identical copy number variations (CNVs) were detected. We also identified eight copy-neutral changes (cn-LOHs) > 1.5 Mb in paired arterial samples in 4 of 10 individuals. The frequencies of the two gains located in the 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) genomic regions were evaluated in 33 paired arteries and blood samples. Two patients contained the gain in 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and one patient contained the gain in 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) that affected only the blood DNA. An additional two patients harboured these CNVs in both the arteries and blood. In conclusion, we discovered and confirmed a gain of the 10q24.31 (ERLIN1) and 12q24.11 (UNG, ACACB) genomic regions in patients with coronary artery disease and metabolic comorbidity. Analysis of DNA extracted from blood indicated a possible somatic origin for these CNVs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep41268DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5264603PMC
January 2017

Planning the human variome project: the Spain report.

Hum Mutat 2009 Apr;30(4):496-510

Division of Personalised Nutrition and Medicine, FDA/National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, Arkansas 72079, USA.

The remarkable progress in characterizing the human genome sequence, exemplified by the Human Genome Project and the HapMap Consortium, has led to the perception that knowledge and the tools (e.g., microarrays) are sufficient for many if not most biomedical research efforts. A large amount of data from diverse studies proves this perception inaccurate at best, and at worst, an impediment for further efforts to characterize the variation in the human genome. Because variation in genotype and environment are the fundamental basis to understand phenotypic variability and heritability at the population level, identifying the range of human genetic variation is crucial to the development of personalized nutrition and medicine. The Human Variome Project (HVP; http://www.humanvariomeproject.org/) was proposed initially to systematically collect mutations that cause human disease and create a cyber infrastructure to link locus specific databases (LSDB). We report here the discussions and recommendations from the 2008 HVP planning meeting held in San Feliu de Guixols, Spain, in May 2008.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/humu.20972DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5879779PMC
April 2009

Beringian standstill and spread of Native American founders.

PLoS One 2007 Sep 5;2(9):e829. Epub 2007 Sep 5.

Department of Evolutionary Biology, University of Tartu, Estonian Biocentre, Tartu, Estonia.

Native Americans derive from a small number of Asian founders who likely arrived to the Americas via Beringia. However, additional details about the initial colonization of the Americas remain unclear. To investigate the pioneering phase in the Americas we analyzed a total of 623 complete mtDNAs from the Americas and Asia, including 20 new complete mtDNAs from the Americas and seven from Asia. This sequence data was used to direct high-resolution genotyping from 20 American and 26 Asian populations. Here we describe more genetic diversity within the founder population than was previously reported. The newly resolved phylogenetic structure suggests that ancestors of Native Americans paused when they reached Beringia, during which time New World founder lineages differentiated from their Asian sister-clades. This pause in movement was followed by a swift migration southward that distributed the founder types all the way to South America. The data also suggest more recent bi-directional gene flow between Siberia and the North American Arctic.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0000829PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1952074PMC
September 2007