Publications by authors named "Maria Sevoyan"

5 Publications

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Prescription opioid use among women of reproductive age in the United States: NHANES, 2003-2018.

Prev Med 2021 Dec 13;153:106846. Epub 2021 Oct 13.

University of South Carolina, Arnold School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Columbia, SC, United States.

Women are prescribed opioids more often than men. Prescription opioid use among women of reproductive age is a public health concern because opioid use during pregnancy is associated with decreased prenatal care and increased risk of adverse perinatal and maternal outcomes. Recent prevalence estimates and correlates of prescription opioid use and long-term use among women of reproductive age are limited. Using the 2003-2018 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), we estimated the national prevalence, trend, and correlates of prescription opioid use, long-term use (≥ 90 days of use), and use of medications for opioid use disorder (MOUD) among women aged 15-44 (n = 13,558). Prescription opioid use within the last 30 days and prescription duration were collected through interviews and identified using prescription codes. Trend analysis was conducted using the National Cancer Institute Joinpoint Trend Analysis Software. The prevalence of prescription opioid use significantly decreased from 5.2% in 2003-2004 to 3.0% in 2017-2018 (p < .05). MOUD use increased significantly from 0.1% in 2005-2006 to 0.4% in 2011-2012. Long-term opioid use did not significantly change over time. Correlates of prescription opioid use and long-term use included ages 35-44, non-Hispanic White, public insurance, and women with poor or fair health status. As policy makers and clinicians strive to reduce the negative impacts of the opioid epidemic, they should consider the demographic groups most likely to use prescription opioids long-term. Additionally, reductions in opioid prescribing should be balanced with increased availability of nonopioid therapies and monitoring for opioid use disorder.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2021.106846DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8595805PMC
December 2021

Acculturation and leisure-time physical activity among Asian American adults in the United States.

Ethn Health 2021 Sep 19:1-15. Epub 2021 Sep 19.

Department of Exercise Science, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Objectives: To examine the association between acculturation and leisure-time physical activity among Asian Americans. Data came from the 2011-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, restricting to non-Hispanic Asian adults aged 20 years and older (n = 1989). Acculturation was assessed by language preference at home, birth locations, and length of residency in the United States (US). Self-reported physical activity was used to estimate leisure-time moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in MET-minutes/week and meeting the World Health Organization's physical activity guidelines. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were used to model MVPA as continuous and categorical variables, respectively. A quarter of Asian Americans spoke only English and 47.8% spoke only non-English at home; 13.0% were born in the US. Asians who spoke only English (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR]:1.5) and Asians who spoke both English and non-English at home (aPR: 1.4) had greater proportions of meeting physical activity guidelines compared to those who spoke only non-English at home. The US-born Asians had higher a proportion of meeting the physical activity guidelines (aPR:1.4) and performed 547.6 more MET-minutes of MVPA each week than foreign-born Asians; they also had a higher proportion of meeting the physical activity guidelines than foreign-born Asians who stayed in US for 10 years (aPR:1.5). Length of time staying in the US was associated with a higher proportion of meeting physical activity guidelines. Among foreign-born Asian Americans, higher acculturation measures were also positively associated with meeting physical activity guidelines. Acculturation was positively associated with physical activity levels among Asian Americans. More acculturated Asian Americans such as those who spoke more English at home and US-born Asians, performed more MVPA than less acculturated Asian Americans. Interventions are needed to promote physical activity among non-English speaking Asian immigrants and recent immigrants.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13557858.2021.1979193DOI Listing
September 2021

Mentoring, Training, and Scholarly Productivity Experiences of Cancer-Related Health Disparities Research Trainees: Do Outcomes Differ for Underrepresented Scientists?

J Cancer Educ 2019 06;34(3):446-454

South Carolina Cancer Disparities Community Network, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

The study aims to explore variation in scholarly productivity outcomes by underrepresented status among a diverse sample of researchers in a community-engaged training program. We identified 141 trainees from a web-based survey of researchers in the National Cancer Institute-funded, Community Networks Program Centers (CNPCs) (2011-2016). We conducted a series of multiple logistic regression models to estimate the effect of National Institutes of Health (NIH)-defined underrepresented status on four, self-reported, scholarly productivity outcomes in the previous 5 years: number of publications (first-authored and total) and funded grants (NIH and any agency). Sixty-five percent (n = 92) indicated NIH underrepresented status. In final adjusted models, non-NIH underrepresented (vs. underrepresented) trainees reported an increased odds of having more than the median number of total publications (> 9) (OR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.21-8.65) and any grant funding (OR = 5.10, 95% CI 1.77-14.65). Reporting ≥ 1 mentors (vs. none) was also positively associated (p < 0.05) with these outcomes. The CNPC underrepresented trainees had similar success in first-authored publications and NIH funding as non-underrepresented trainees, but not total publications and grants. Examining trainees' mentoring experiences over time in relation to scholarly productivity outcomes is needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13187-018-1322-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6087686PMC
June 2019

The Dietary Inflammatory Index is associated with elevated white blood cell counts in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Brain Behav Immun 2018 03 5;69:296-303. Epub 2017 Dec 5.

Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29208, United States; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of South Carolina, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29208, United States; Connecting Health Innovations, LLC, 915 Greene Street, Suite 200, Columbia, SC 29208, United States.

White blood cells (WBCs) are considered a reliable biomarker of inflammation. Elevations in both WBCs and pro-inflammatory cytokines are associated with several chronic conditions. Diet is a strong moderator of inflammation and WBCs. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII®) and WBCs using data from the United States National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). NHANES is a cross-sectional study that occurs in two-year cycles. Respondents from five cycles (n = 26,046) with available data on diet (collected through a single 24-h dietary recall [24HR]) and WBCs (derived using the Coulter method) were included. The DII (theoretical range is about -8 to +8) was derived from the micro and macronutrients calculated from the 24HR. Linear regression models, using survey design procedures, were used to estimate adjusted mean WBC (i.e., total, lymphocytes, monocytes, and neutrophils) counts and percentages by DII quartiles. Among all participants no statistically significant difference in WBCs were observed when comparing DII quartile 4 (most pro-inflammatory) to quartile 1 (most anti-inflammatory). However, a one-unit increase in the DII was associated with a 0.028 (1000 per µL) increase in total WBCs (p = .01). Additionally, a 0.024 increase in neutrophils (p < .01) was observed for a one-unit increase in the DII. In the group of participants with normal body mass index (BMI, 18.5-24.9 kg/m), those in DII quartile 4 had higher levels of total WBCs compared to subjects with normal BMI in DII quartile 1 (7.12 vs. 6.88, p = .01). Similar comparisons were observed for monocytes and neutrophils. However, these relationships were not observed for participants who were overweight or obese, which are pro-inflammatory conditions. Normal-weight individuals consuming more pro-inflammatory diets were more likely to have elevated WBCs. Because of its cross-sectional design, NHANES cannot inform directly on temporal relations, thus limiting causal inference. Future research is needed to examine the impact of anti-inflammatory diet adoption on lowering levels of WBCs, in addition to other inflammatory mediators.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbi.2017.12.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5857420PMC
March 2018

Prevention of amyloidosis in familial Mediterranean fever with colchicine: a case-control study in Armenia.

Med Princ Pract 2009 30;18(6):441-6. Epub 2009 Sep 30.

American University of Armenia, Yerevan, Republic of Armenia.

Objective: To determine whether or not the use of colchicine decreases the risk of amyloidosis among Armenian patients with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF).

Subjects And Methods: The study included 99 Armenian patients from the Center of Medical Genetics database with genetically ascertained FMF; 33 had renal amyloidosis and 66 were randomly selected control patients without renal amyloidosis. Self- reported colchicine use was assessed by interviewer-based questionnaire.

Results: The patients with incident amyloidosis were more likely to be older men, but younger at the time of disease onset, and more likely to have had a family history of amyloidosis and M694F mutation in the MEFV gene compared to patients without amyloidosis. The risk of amyloidosis decreased with adequate colchicine use rather than nonadequate use (adjusted odds ratio, OR, 0.48, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.16-1.43), continuous colchicine use rather than interrupted use (adjusted OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.04-0.53), earlier rather than later initiation age of colchicine treatment (adjusted OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.90-1.01), current colchicine rather than ever/never colchicine use (adjusted OR 0.20, 95% CI 0.05-0.89).

Conclusion: The study demonstrated that colchicine treatment is effective in preventing amyloidosis among Armenian patients with FMF and that earlier initiation and continuous therapy at an adequate dose of 1.2-1.8 mg/day may be associated with a decreased amyloidosis risk among Armenian patients with FMF.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000235892DOI Listing
February 2010
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