Publications by authors named "Maria Rosa Bollea"

9 Publications

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Effect of intensive nutritional counseling and support on clinical outcomes of hemodialysis patients.

Nutrition 2012 Oct 1;28(10):1012-5. Epub 2012 May 1.

Department of Clinical Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Objective: Protein-energy wasting is frequently found in patients on hemodialysis (HD). Anorexia and hypophagia contribute to malnutrition and increased morbidity and mortality, but the clinical impact of correcting hypophagia remains uncertain. We evaluated whether the correction of hypophagia influences morbidity and mortality in anorexic patients on HD.

Methods: Thirty-four patients on HD were enrolled in a 2-y follow-up program including regular nutritional assessments. Patients not meeting the nutritional requirements during the follow-up received nutritional counseling, consisting of advice, individually tailored diets, and, for a failed dietary intervention, artificial nutrition. Biochemical, anthropometric, and body composition parameters, morbidity, and mortality were recorded in all patients at 12 and 24 mo.

Results: At baseline, 14 patients (41%) were anorexic, and 20 patients (59%) were non-anorexic. Anorexic patients were hypophagic and presented with a decreased fat-free mass. After 12 and 24 mo, cholesterol, albumin, lymphocyte count, and body mass index did not differ between the groups, whereas fat-free mass (percentage) in supplemented anorexic patients significantly improved in no longer differing from non-anorexic patients (65.8 ± 4.4 versus 65.4 ± 8.9, respectively, P = NS; 65.8 ± 4.4 versus 66.7 ± 10.78, respectively, P = NS). Morbidity and mortality were not different between the two groups.

Conclusion: In patients on HD, nutritional counseling and nutritional support positively affect the nutritional status in hypophagic patients and make the risk of morbidity and mortality in anorexic patients comparable to those of non-anorexic patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2012.01.008DOI Listing
October 2012

Carnitine administration reduces cytokine levels, improves food intake, and ameliorates body composition in tumor-bearing rats.

Cancer Invest 2011 Dec;29(10):696-700

Department of Clinical Medicine , Sapienza University of Rome, Italy.

Increased cytokine expression contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer anorexia?cachexia syndrome. Carnitine may reduce inflammation in chronic diseases. We tested the effects of L-propionylcarnitine (PC group) or saline (C group) on food intake (FI), body composition, and inflammatory status of MCA-sarcoma-bearing rats. On tumor appearance, rats were randomly assigned to daily i.p. injection of L-propionylcarnitine (250 mg/kgBW/d; n = 8) or saline (equal volume; n = 8). FI and fat-free mass wasting improved in PC rats only (p < .01 vs. controls). Cytokines? levels decreased in PC rats vs. controls (p < .02). Results suggest that carnitine may ameliorate cancer anorexia?cachexia, via reduction of the inflammatory status.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/07357907.2011.626476DOI Listing
December 2011

Stimulation of the nicotine antiinflammatory pathway improves food intake and body composition in tumor-bearing rats.

Nutr Cancer 2011 ;63(2):295-9

Department of Clinical Medicine, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.

Inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer anorexia-cachexia syndrome. Nicotine administration reduces cytokine levels and mortality during sepsis. Therefore, nicotine administration may result in improved anorexia-cachexia. Sixteen male Fischer rats inoculated with MCA sarcoma were assigned to random injections of nicotine (NIC; 200 mg/kg BW/d) or saline (C). Food intake (FI), body weight, body composition, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 levels were evaluated. Data were analyzed via Student's t-test for paired and unpaired data and ANOVA. FI started declining 12 days after tumor inoculation both in C and NIC rats, but the decline was significantly attenuated by nicotine administration. At the end of the study, lean body mass wasting was more severe in C rats than in NIC rats (P<0.05), whereas a trend toward attenuation of fat mass depletion was observed. IL-1 circulating levels were significantly lower in NIC rats than in C rats (114±21 pg/mL vs. 190±35 pg/mL, respectively; P<0.01), whereas the reduction of IL-6 levels in NIC rats was only marginally not significant when compared to C rats (555±174 pg/mL vs. 721±160 pg/mL, respectively; P=0.06). Our data suggest that the nicotinic antiinflammatory pathway may represent an interesting and possibly effective therapy for anorexia-cachexia syndrome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01635581.2011.530736DOI Listing
June 2011

Dietary therapy: a new strategy for management of chronic pelvic pain.

Nutr Res Rev 2011 Jun 25;24(1):31-8. Epub 2010 Oct 25.

Endometriosis Center, Section of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Surgical Sciences, Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome, Italy.

Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) can be identified as a chronic nociceptive, inflammatory and neuropathic pain characterised by spontaneous pain and an exaggerated response to painful and/or innocuous stimuli. This pain condition is extremely debilitating and usually difficult to treat. Currently, the main approaches to treatment include counselling supported by reassuring ultrasound scanning or psychotherapy, attempting to provide reassurance using laparoscopy to exclude serious pelvic pathology, hormonal therapy and neuroablative treatment to interrupt nerve pathways. Dietary supplementation has been suggested as a means to treat chronic medical illnesses that are poorly responsive to prescription drugs or in which therapeutic options are limited, costly or carry a high side-effect profile. A comprehensive search of the PubMed database was performed using the search terms 'chronic pelvic pain', 'oxidative stress', 'antioxidants' and 'dietary therapy'. The systematic review focuses on both randomised and non-randomised controlled trials from 2005 onwards, in which CPP was the end point. Given the complexity and not well-understood aetiology of CPP, its treatment is often unsatisfactory and limited to partial symptom relief. Dietary therapy with antioxidants improves function of the immune system and in fighting free radical damage. Agents with antioxidant activity are able to improve CPP without undesired effects and any important metabolic changes associated with hormonal suppression therapy. In conclusion, dietary therapy with antioxidants could be considered as a new effective strategy in the long term for CPP, and may be better accepted by patients. Further randomised trials with larger series and long-term follow-up to confirm these observations are needed.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0954422410000272DOI Listing
June 2011

Recurrence rate of endometrioma after laparoscopic cystectomy: a comparative randomized trial between post-operative hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy vs. placebo.

Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2009 Nov 7;147(1):72-7. Epub 2009 Aug 7.

Endometriosis Center, Section of Gynecology & Obstetrics, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Tor Vergata University Hospital, Viale Oxford, 81-00133 Rome, Italy.

Objective(s): To assess the recurrence rate of endometrioma after laparoscopic cystectomy plus hormonal suppression treatment or plus dietary therapy compared to post-operative placebo.

Study Design: A randomized comparative trial was conducted on 259 consecutive women who underwent laparoscopic unilateral/bilateral cystectomy for endometrioma. Seven days after surgery, the patients were randomly allocated on the basis of a computer-generated randomization sequence, to one of four post-operative management arms as follows: placebo (n=65) or gonadotrophin-releasing hormone analogue (tryptorelin or leuprorelin, 3.75 mg every 28 days) (n=65) or continuous low-dose monophasic oral contraceptives (ethynilestradiol, 0.03 mg plus gestoden, 0.75 mg) (n=64) or dietary therapy (vitamins, minerals salts, lactic ferments, fish oil) (n=65) for 6 months. At 18 months' follow-up after surgery, all patients were monitored with a clinical gynecologic examination, and a transvaginal ultrasonography for possible evidence of endometrioma recurrence.

Result(s): At 18 months' transvaginal ultrasonographic follow-up after surgery, no significant recurrence rate of endometrioma was detected in women who received a postoperative course of hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy when compared with placebo (placebo vs. GnRH-a P=0.316, placebo vs. estroprogestin P=0.803, placebo vs. dietary therapy P=0.544). Second-look laparoscopy was performed on a clinical basis and confirmed the ultrasonographic suspicion of recurrence of endometrioma in all cases: 10 (16.6%) in the post-operative placebo group vs. 6 (10.3%) in the post-operative GnRH-a group vs. 9 (15.0%) in the post-operative continuous estroprogestin group vs. 11 (17.8%) in the post-operative dietary therapy group. Of 36 patients with recurrent ovarian endometriosis, 8 had recurrence on the treated ovary, 20 on the contralateral ovary that appeared to be normal at the time of the first-line surgery, and 8 on both the treated and untreated ovaries. Endometrioma recurrences were associated with moderate-to-severe painful symptoms in 14/36 patients (38.8%), while the remaining 22 (61.1%) patients were asymptomatic.

Conclusion(s): A 6-month course of hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy after laparoscopic cystectomy had no significant effect on the recurrence rate of ovarian endometriosis when compared with surgery plus placebo. So, treatment of endometrioma can be carried out exclusively by laparoscopic cystectomy without post-operative therapy, if a complete excision of ovarian endometriosis has been assured.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejogrb.2009.07.003DOI Listing
November 2009

Malnutrition and wasting in renal disease.

Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2009 Jul;12(4):378-83

Department of Clinical Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

Purpose Of Review: Malnutrition and accelerated catabolism frequently complicate chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. This review provides an update on the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanisms underlying protein-energy wasting, both in experimental and human models, and on the currently available therapeutic approaches.

Recent Findings: Increased levels of circulating cytokines, metabolic acidosis, oxidative stress and insulin resistance all appear to be variably implicated in muscle protein breakdown during end-stage renal disease and dialysis. The individual role of each component in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease-related wasting is still unclear, but recent clinical data show a positive relationship between inflammation and muscle protein catabolism as a major contributing factor.

Summary: The basis for appropriate therapeutic approaches to protein-energy wasting in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease relies entirely on the understanding of its pathophysiology. Our knowledge of the pathogenesis of malnutrition and hypercatabolism in renal disease is still limited and mostly based on experimental data, but the currently available evidence suggests that multimodal preventive and therapeutic strategies should be entertained.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCO.0b013e32832c7ae1DOI Listing
July 2009

Hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy versus placebo in the control of painful symptoms after conservative surgery for endometriosis stage III-IV. A randomized comparative trial.

Fertil Steril 2007 Dec 16;88(6):1541-7. Epub 2007 Apr 16.

Endometriosis Center, Section of Gynecology & Obstetrics, Department of Surgery, Tor Vergata University Hospital, Rome, Italy.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness for the outcomes of endometriosis-related pain and quality of life of conservative surgery plus placebo compared with conservative surgery plus hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy.

Design: Randomized comparative trial.

Setting: University hospital.

Patient(s): Two hundred twenty-two consecutive women who underwent conservative pelvic surgery for symptomatic endometriosis stage III-IV (r-AFS).

Intervention(s): Six months of placebo (n = 110) versus GnRH-a (tryptorelin or leuprorelin, 3.75 mg every 28 days) (n = 39) or continuous estroprogestin (ethynilestradiol, 0.03 mg plus gestoden, 0.75 mg) (n = 38) versus dietary therapy (vitamins, minerals salts, lactic ferments, fish oil) (n = 35).

Main Outcome Measure(s): Painful symptoms (visual analogue scale score) and quality-of-life endometriosis-related symptoms (SF-36 score) at 12 months' follow-up.

Result(s): Patients treated with postoperative hormonal suppression therapy showed less visual analogue scale scores for dysmenorrhoea than patients of the other groups. Hormonal suppression therapy and dietary supplementation were equally effective in reducing nonmenstrual pelvic pain. Surgery plus placebo showed significative decrease in dyspareunia scores. Postoperative medical and dietary therapy allowed a better quality of life than placebo.

Conclusion(s): Postoperative hormonal suppression treatment or dietary therapy are more effective than surgery plus placebo to obtain relief of pain associated with endometriosis stage III-IV and improvement of quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2007.01.053DOI Listing
December 2007