Publications by authors named "Maria Rita Marchetti"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Determinants of botulinum toxin discontinuation in multiple sclerosis: a retrospective study.

Neurol Sci 2017 Oct 1;38(10):1841-1848. Epub 2017 Aug 1.

S. Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University, Via di Grottarossa 1035, 00189, Rome, Italy.

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the long-term persistence to treatment with botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) for multiple sclerosis (MS)-related spasticity and the determinants of BoNT-A discontinuation in daily clinical setting. We retrospectively collected data of patients who started BoNT-A injections and underwent regular follow-up visits. Determinants of BoNT-A discontinuation were explored in a time-to-event Cox regression analysis which included as independent variables a large set of demographic and clinical characteristics. A total of 185 patients started BoNT-A injections from 2002 to 2014 and were followed up to September 2016. Of them, data on 121 were considered in our analysis. At follow-up, 53 (44%) patients were still on treatment and 68 (56%) patients discontinued BoNT-A after a median time of 1.2 years [interval 6 months to 7.4 years]. The reasons for discontinuation were loss of efficacy (n = 45), logistic problems or barriers to reach the structure (n = 16), and adverse events (n = 7). The absence of caregiver (hazard ratio = 1.69, p = 0.03) and lack of regular rehabilitation (hazard ratio = 1.78, p = 0.02) were two independent predictors for BoNT-A discontinuation. Our study confirms the beneficial effect of combining BoNT-A injections with rehabilitation and highlights the crucial role of caregivers for achieving better long-term outcomes in people with MS suffering from spasticity.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-017-3078-3DOI Listing
October 2017

The dual task-cost of standing balance affects quality of life in mildly disabled MS people.

Neurol Sci 2016 May 4;37(5):673-9. Epub 2016 Jan 4.

Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University, Viale dell'Università, 30, 00185, Rome, Italy.

The aim of this study was to explore the correlations between the dual-task cost (DTC) of standing balance and quality of life (QoL) in mildly disabled patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). In this cross-sectional study, patients affected by MS with an expanded disability status scale (EDSS) score of 3.0 or less and without an overt balance impairment were tested by means of static posturography under eyes-opened (single-task condition) and while performing the Stroop word-color test (dual-task condition), to estimate the DTC of standing balance. The self-reported 54-item MS quality of life questionnaire (MSQoL-54) was also administered to obtain a MS-specific assessment of health-related QoL. Among the 120 screened patients, 75 (53 women, 22 men) were tested. Although there was no impact of the DTC of standing balance on the physical and mental composite scores of MSQoL-54, patients who had a greater DTC of standing balance scored worse on role limitations due to physical problems (p = 0.007) and social function (p < 0.001), irrespective of demographic and other clinical characteristics including walking performance and cognitive status. However, the EDSS step and fatigue also contributed to reduced scores in these two QoL domains (p-values < 0.01). In conclusion, the phenomenon of cognitive-motor interference, investigated as DTC of standing balance, may affect specific QoL domains even in mildly disabled patients with MS and in the absence of an overt balance dysfunction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10072-015-2456-yDOI Listing
May 2016

Oral dalfampridine improves standing balance detected at static posturography in multiple sclerosis.

Mult Scler Int 2014 27;2014:802307. Epub 2014 Mar 27.

MS Centre, Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University, Viale dell'Università, 30-00185 Rome, Italy.

We report a 14-week post-marketing experience on 20 patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) who started prolonged-release (PR) oral dalfampridine 10 mg twice daily according to European Medicine Agency criteria. They underwent serial static posturography assessments and the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) to investigate whether PR dalfampridine could impact standing balance and self-reported perception of balance. The incidence of accidental falls per person per month was also recorded throughout the study. Eight (40%) patients, who had a relevant improvement in walking speed, were defined as treatment responders. They showed a significant improvement of standing balance (with respect to pretreatment assessment) when contrasted with 12 (60%) nonresponders (F [4,15] = 3.959, P = 0.027). No significant changes in DHI score, as well as in its functional, physical, and emotional subscales, were found in both responders and nonresponders at the end of study (all P values are ≥0.2). Treatment response did not affect the incidence of accidental falls. Future studies based on larger sample sizes, and with longer followup, are required to confirm the beneficial effect of PR dalfampridine on standing balance.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/802307DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3985326PMC
May 2014

Home-based balance training using the Wii balance board: a randomized, crossover pilot study in multiple sclerosis.

Neurorehabil Neural Repair 2013 Jul-Aug;27(6):516-25. Epub 2013 Mar 11.

Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based rehabilitation of balance using the Nintendo Wii Balance Board System (WBBS) in patients affected by multiple sclerosis (MS).

Methods: In this 24-week, randomized, 2-period crossover pilot study, 36 patients having an objective balance disorder were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to 2 counterbalanced arms. Group A started a 12-week period of home-based WBBS training followed by a 12-week period without any intervention; group B received the treatment in reverse order. As endpoints, we considered the mean difference (compared with baseline) in force platform measures (i.e., the displacement of body center of pressure in 30 seconds), 4-step square test (FSST), 25-foot timed walking test (25-FWT), and 29-item MS Impact Scale (MSIS-29), as evaluated after 12 weeks and at the end of the 24-week study period.

Results: The 2 groups did not differ in baseline characteristics. Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed significant time × treatment effects, indicating that WBBS was effective in ameliorating force platform measures (F = 4.608, P = .016), FSST (F = 3.745, P = .034), 25-FWT (F = 3.339, P = .048), and MSIS-29 (F = 4.282, P = .023). Five adverse events attributable to the WBSS training (knee or low back pain) were recorded, but only 1 patient had to retire from the study.

Conclusion: A home-based WBBS training might potentially provide an effective, engaging, balance rehabilitation solution for people with MS. However, the risk of WBBS training-related injuries should be carefully balanced with benefits. Further studies, including cost-effectiveness analyses, are warranted to establish whether WBBS may be useful in the home setting.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1545968313478484DOI Listing
January 2014