Publications by authors named "Maria Raygorodskaya"

3 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Low expression of CD24 is associated with poor survival in colorectal cancer.

Biochimie 2021 Oct 9. Epub 2021 Oct 9.

Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, HSE University, Moscow, Russia; SRC Bioclinicum, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

In this study we analyzed expression of CD24 in a cohort of colorectal cancer patients using immunohistochemistry staining of CD24. We found a significant association between absence or low expression of CD24 (10% of membranous and 55% of cytoplasmic staining) and shortened patient survival. Protein localization played a crucial role in the prognosis: membranous form was the major and prognostic one in primary tumors, while cytoplasmic expression was elevated in liver metastases compared to the primary tumors and contained prognostic information. Then, using The Cancer Genome Atlas Colon Adenocarcinoma (TCGA-COAD) RNA-seq data, we showed that CD24 mRNA level was two-fold decreased in primary colorectal cancers compared to adjacent normal mucosa. Like the protein staining data, ten percent of patients with the lowest mRNA expression levels of CD24 in primary tumors had reduced survival compared to the ones with higher expression. To explain these findings mechanistically, shRNA-mediated CD24 knockdown was performed in HT-29 colorectal cancer cells. It resulted in the increase of cell migration in vitro, no changes in proliferation and apoptosis, and a slight decrease in cell invasion. As increased cell migration is a hallmark of metastasis formation, this finding corroborates the association of a decreased CD24 expression with poor prognosis. Differential gene expression analysis revealed upregulation of genes involved in cell migration in the group of patients with low CD24 expression, including integrin subunit α3 and α3, β3 subunits of laminin 332. Further co-expression analysis identified SPI1, STAT1 and IRF1 transcription factors as putative master-regulators in this group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biochi.2021.10.004DOI Listing
October 2021

Knockdown of the α5 laminin chain affects differentiation of colorectal cancer cells and their sensitivity to chemotherapy.

Biochimie 2020 Jul 22;174:107-116. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

Faculty of Biology and Biotechnology, National Research University Higher School of Economics, Myasnitskaya str. 13/4, 117997, Moscow, Russia; Shemyakin-Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str. 16/10, 117997, Moscow, Russia; Scientific Research Center Bioclinicum, Ugreshskaya str. 2/85, 115088, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address:

The interaction of tumor cells with the extracellular matrix (ECM) may affect the rate of cancer progression and metastasis. One of the major components of ECM are laminins, the heterotrimeric glycoproteins consisting of α-, β-, and γ-chains (αβγ). Laminins interact with their cell surface receptors and, thus, regulate multiple cellular processes. In this work, we demonstrate that shRNA-mediated knockdown of the α5 laminin chain results in Wnt- and mTORC1-dependent partial dedifferentiation of colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that this dedifferentiation involved activation of ER-stress signaling, pathway promoting the sensitivity of cells to 5-fluorouracil.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biochi.2020.04.016DOI Listing
July 2020

Evaluation of the long-term skeletal effect induced by teratogen 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine on offspring of high (C3H/HeJ) and low (C57BL/6J) bone mass phenotype mice.

Bone Rep 2018 Jun 29;8:239-243. Epub 2018 May 29.

The Musculoskeletal Genetics Laboratory, Azrieli Faculty of Medicine, Bar Ilan University, Safed, Israel.

The long term skeletal effects of antenatal exposure to teratogen 5-deoxy-2'-cytidine (5-AZA) were studied using two inbred strains, C3H/HeJ (C3H, with inherently stronger bones) and C57Bl/6J (C57, with weaker bones). We previously reported that exposure to 5-AZA resulted in loss of bone quality in 3- and 6-mo-old C3H offspring. In this study, we further examined whether the long-term effects of an acute teratogenic exposure are still evident in older mice. Bone phenotypes of 12 mo-old mice exposed to a single injection of 5-AZA on day 10 of their mother's pregnancy were evaluated by micro-computed tomography and compared to the untreated controls. The main observation of this study is that 5-AZA-induced loss of bone length was registered in 12-mo-old C57 and C3H males. As expected, we did not find differences in the 3rd lumbar vertebra since exposure to 5-AZA was shown to affect the limb buds but not the axial skeleton. Trajectory of changes in bone phenotypes from ages 3 mo through 6 mo to 12 mo was also compared; 5-AZA-exposed C57 males had consistently lower femoral length and trabecular BMD than age-matched controls. In summary, by characterizing teratogen-exposed C57 and C3H mice, we further confirmed that the adaptive response to antenatal insults continue into mid-life of the mice as well as there is a sex-specificity of these responses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bonr.2018.05.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6020399PMC
June 2018
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