Publications by authors named "Maria Paula Jassir Acosta"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Relationship between the sociodemographic characteristics of participants in the DIADA project and the rate of compliance with follow-up assessments in the initial stage of the intervention.

Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) 2021 Jul 21;50 Suppl 1:102-109. Epub 2021 Jul 21.

Departamento de Epidemiología Clínica y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia; Departamento de Psiquiatría y Salud Mental, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Bogotá, Colombia.

Objective: Analyse the relationship between the sociodemographic profile of the DIADA study participants and the rate of compliance with the follow-up assessments in the early stage of this project's intervention for depression and unhealthy alcohol use offered within primary care.

Methods: A non-experimental quantitative analysis was conducted. The sociodemographic data of DIADA [Detección y Atención Integral de Depresión y Abuso de Alcohol en Atención Primaria (Detection and Integrated Care for Depression and Alcohol Use in Primary Care)] study participants had been previously collected. At the time of the evaluation (September 12, 2019), only the participants who had been in the project for a minimum of 3 months were included. By using univariate (Chi-squared) analyses, we studied the association between participants' sociodemographic profile and their rate of compliance with the first follow-up assessment at 3 months after study initiation.

Results: At the date of the evaluation, 584 adult participants were identified, of which 389 had been involved in the project for more than 3 months. From the participants included, 320 performed the first follow-up, while 69 did not. The compliance rate to the first follow-up was 82.3% (95 % [CI] 78.1%-86%) and was not affected by: site location, age, sex, civil status, level of education, use of smartphone, PHQ9 score (measuring depression symptomatology) or AUDIT score (measuring harmful alcohol use). Participants who do not use a smartphone, from rural areas and with a lower socioeconomic status, tended to show higher compliance rates. Statistically significant associations were found; participants with lower job stability and a lack of access to the Internet showed higher compliance rates to the early initial follow-up assessment.

Conclusions: The compliance rate was high and generally constant in spite of the variability of the sociodemographic profiles of the participants, although several sub-groups of participants showed particularly high rates of compliance. These findings may suggest that integrating mental health into primary care allows the structural and financial barriers that hinder access to health in Colombia to be broken down by raising awareness about mental illnesses, their high prevalence and the importance of timely and accessible medical management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rcpeng.2021.06.006DOI Listing
July 2021

Characterizing the perceived stigma towards mental health in the early implementation of an integrated services model in primary care in Colombia. A qualitative analysis.

Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) 2021 Jul 10;50 Suppl 1:91-101. Epub 2021 Jul 10.

Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia.

Background: Stigma is a sociocultural barrier to accessing mental health services and prevents individuals with mental health disorders from receiving mental health care. The Ministry of Health and Social Protection of Colombia acknowledges that a great number of people with mental disorders do not seek medical aid due to stigma.

Objectives: Characterise the perceived stigma towards mental health among the stakeholders involved in the early implementation of the DIADA project [Detección y Atención Integral de Depresión y Abuso de Alcohol en Atención Primaria (Detection and Integrated Care for Depression and Alcohol Use in Primary Care)]. Explore whether the implementation of this model can decrease stigma. Describe the impact of the implementation on the lives of patients and medical practice.

Materials And Methods: Eighteen stakeholders (7 patients, 5 physicians and 6 administrative staff) were interviewed and a secondary data analysis of 24 interview transcripts was conducted using a rapid analysis technique.

Results: The main effects of stigma towards mental health disorders included refusing medical attention, ignoring illness, shame and labelling. Half of the stakeholders reported that the implementation of mental health care in primary care could decrease stigma. All of the stakeholders said that the implementation had a positive impact.

Conclusions: The perceived stigma was characterised as social and aesthetic in nature. Communication and awareness about mental health is improving, which could facilitate access to mental health treatment and strengthen the doctor-patient relationship. Culture is important for understanding stigma towards mental health in the population studied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rcpeng.2021.06.009DOI Listing
July 2021

Relationship between the sociodemographic characteristics of participants in the DIADA Project and the rate of compliance with follow-up assessments in the initial stage of the intervention.

Rev Colomb Psiquiatr 2021 Jun 15;50 Suppl 1:106-113. Epub 2021 Mar 15.

Departamento de Epidemiología Clínica y Bioestadística, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia; Departamento de Psiquiatría y Salud Mental, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, Colombia; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Bogotá, Colombia.

Objective: Analyse the relationship between the sociodemographic profile of the DIADA study participants and the rate of compliance with the follow-up assessments in the early stage of this project's intervention for depression and unhealthy alcohol use offered within primary care.

Methods: A non-experimental quantitative analysis was conducted. The sociodemographic data of DIADA [Detección y Atención Integral de Depresión y Abuso de Alcohol en Atención Primaria (Detection and Integrated Care for Depression and Alcohol Use in Primary Care)] study participants had been previously collected. At the time of the evaluation (September 12, 2019), only the participants who had been in the project for a minimum of three months were included. By using univariate (Chi-squared) analyses, we studied the association between participants' sociodemographic profile and their rate of compliance with the first follow-up assessment at three months after study initiation.

Results: At the date of the evaluation, 584 adult participants were identified, of which 389 had been involved in the project for more than three months. From the participants included, 320 performed the first follow-up, while 69 did not. The compliance rate to the first follow-up was 82.3% (CI 95% 78.1%-86%) and was not affected by: site location, age, sex, civil status, level of education, use of smartphone, PHQ9 score (measuring depression symptomatology) or AUDIT score (measuring harmful alcohol use). Participants who do not use a smartphone, from rural areas and with a lower socioeconomic status, tended to show higher compliance rates. Statistically significant associations were found; participants with lower job stability and a lack of access to the Internet showed higher compliance rates to the early initial follow-up assessment.

Conclusions: The compliance rate was high and generally constant in spite of the variability of the sociodemographic profiles of the participants, although several sub-groups of participants showed particularly high rates of compliance. These findings may suggest that integrating mental health into primary care allows the structural and financial barriers that hinder access to health in Colombia to be broken down by raising awareness about mental illnesses, their high prevalence and the importance of timely and accessible medical management.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rcp.2020.11.019DOI Listing
June 2021

Characterizing the perceived stigma towards mental health in the early implementation of an integrated services model in Primary Care in Colombia. A qualitative analysis.

Rev Colomb Psiquiatr 2021 Jun 23;50 Suppl 1:95-105. Epub 2021 Feb 23.

Departamento de Epidemiología Clínica y Bioestadística, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá DC, Colombia; Departamento de Psiquiatría y Salud Mental, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá DC, Colombia; Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Bogotá DC, Colombia.

Background: Stigma is a sociocultural barrier to accessing mental health services and prevents individuals with mental health disorders from receiving mental health care. The Ministry of Health and Social Protection of Colombia acknowledges that a great number of people with mental disorders do not seek medical aid due to stigma.

Objectives: Characterise the perceived stigma towards mental health among the stakeholders involved in the early implementation of the DIADA project [Detección y Atención Integral de Depresión y Abuso de Alcohol en Atención Primaria (Detection and Integrated Care for Depression and Alcohol Use in Primary Care)]. Explore whether the implementation of this model can decrease stigma. Describe the impact of the implementation on the lives of patients and medical practice.

Materials And Methods: Eighteen stakeholders (7 patients, 5 physicians and 6 administrative staff) were interviewed and a secondary data analysis of 24 interview transcripts was conducted using a rapid analysis technique.

Results: The main effects of stigma towards mental health disorders included refusing medical attention, ignoring illness, shame and labelling. Half of the stakeholders reported that the implementation of mental health care in primary care could decrease stigma. All of the stakeholders said that the implementation had a positive impact.

Conclusions: The perceived stigma was characterised as social and aesthetic in nature. Communication and awareness about mental health is improving, which could facilitate access to mental health treatment and strengthen the doctor-patient relationship. Culture is important for understanding stigma towards mental health in the population studied.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rcp.2020.11.017DOI Listing
June 2021
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