Publications by authors named "Maria Laura Flori"

11 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Reticular erythematous mucinosis: a clinical challenge.

Ital J Dermatol Venerol 2021 May 13. Epub 2021 May 13.

Dermatology Section, Department of Clinical Medicine and Immunological Science, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S2784-8671.21.06946-7DOI Listing
May 2021

Usefulness of in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy in Morbihan syndrome.

Skin Res Technol 2021 Jan 17. Epub 2021 Jan 17.

Department of Medical, Surgical and Neurological Science, Dermatology Section, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/srt.13002DOI Listing
January 2021

Dupilumab in Elderly Patients With Severe Atopic Dermatitis.

Dermatitis 2020 Dec 15;Publish Ahead of Print. Epub 2020 Dec 15.

From the Dermatology Section, Department of Medical, Surgical and Neurological Science, University of Siena, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, Siena Allergological and Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Florence Department of Medical Biotechnology, University of Siena, Siena Unit of Dermatology, Livorno Hospital, Livorno, Italy.

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) in the elderly has been poorly investigated, although its incidence is gradually increasing mainly in industrialized countries. Age-specific factors in older patients must be considered when selecting treatment options.

Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of dupilumab in treating elderly patients with severe AD.

Methods: This was a retrospective, multicenter study involving 26 elderly patients (age, ≥65 years) with severe AD who were treated with dupilumab for at least 16 weeks. Absolute and percentage frequencies were used to evaluate qualitative variables and mean and SD for quantitative ones. For Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI), Pruritus Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), the median was also calculated. Wilcoxon test was used to evaluate the variations in EASI, Pruritus NRS, and DLQI observed between the 2 examinations.

Results: After 4 months of therapy, the majority of patients showed a significant improvement in EASI (64.4%), Pruritus NRS (58.2%), and DLQI (44.9%). Only 11% of patients reported mild or moderate conjunctivitis.

Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study concerning the use of dupilumab in the elderly with severe AD. Our data show the effectiveness of dupilumab in this particular population with a lower percentage of conjunctivitis than observed in studies on adults and also excellent control of itching. Only larger, controlled case studies will be able to clarify whether the dosage or frequency of administration of dupilumab in these patients should be different from the protocol used for adults.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DER.0000000000000686DOI Listing
December 2020

Impact of dupilumab discontinuation in a patient with atopic prurigo.

Ital J Dermatol Venerol 2021 Jun 21;156(3):406. Epub 2020 Oct 21.

Unit of Allergological Dermatology, Section of Dermatology, Department of Medical, Surgical and Neurosciences, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0392-0488.20.06714-0DOI Listing
June 2021

Amenorrhea secondary to vismodegib: An adverse event to consider especially in female patients with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

Dermatol Ther 2020 07 26;33(4):e13527. Epub 2020 May 26.

Department of Medical, Surgical and Neurological Science, Dermatology Section, University of Siena, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, Siena, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/dth.13527DOI Listing
July 2020

Severe Adult Atopic Dermatitis: Clinical Challenges.

Dermatitis 2020 Jul/Aug;31(4):e48-e49

Allergological Dermatology Unit, Dermatology Section, Department of Medical, Surgical and Neuro-Sciences, University of Siena, Italy Allergological and Pediatric Dermatology Unit, Department of Health Sciences, University of Florence, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/DER.0000000000000592DOI Listing
April 2021

Pigmentary demarcation lines of Voigt-Futcher: Dermoscopic and reflectance confocal microscopy features.

Skin Res Technol 2020 05 28;26(3):440-442. Epub 2019 Sep 28.

Dermatology Section, Department of Medical, Surgical and Neurological Science, S. Maria alle Scotte Hospital, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/srt.12795DOI Listing
May 2020

Pyoderma gangrenosum secondary to total hip replacement.

G Ital Dermatol Venereol 2019 Apr 23. Epub 2019 Apr 23.

Dermatology Section, Department of Clinical Medicine and Immunological Science, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0392-0488.19.06256-4DOI Listing
April 2019

Thalidomide in the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma.

Dermatology 2007 ;215(3):240-4

Department of Clinical Medicine and Immunological Sciences, Section of Dermatology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Background: Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a lymphangioproliferative tumour. Therapy of KS depends on the characteristics of the disease, especially area and growth rate of lesions, and patient condition. Currently symptomatic resectable lesions are excised, whereas more advanced disease and unresectable lesions are treated with radiotherapy. If a large area or internal organs are affected or other treatments fail, chemotherapy is used. Recently some authors have reported their encouraging experience in the use of thalidomide in patients with AIDS-related KS.

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of thalidomide in 3 patients with non-AIDS-related KS.

Methods: Two patients with classic widespread cutaneous and 1 with iatrogenic cutaneous and visceral KS were treated with thalidomide (100 mg/day) for 12 months.

Results: In all 3 patients partial remission was evident after 4 months of thalidomide therapy; in 2 out of 3 complete remission was achieved after 12 months of treatment.

Conclusions: Our results seem to confirm the utility of thalidomide in the treatment of non-AIDS-related KS.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000106583DOI Listing
September 2007

Eyelid dermatitis: an evaluation of 447 patients.

Am J Contact Dermat 2003 Jun;14(2):69-74

Dipartmento di Dermatologia, Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples, Italy.

Background: Eyelids can be affected by various types of dermatitis that are often difficult to diagnose.

Objective: The aim of the study was to establish some guidelines for a correct diagnosis.

Methods: A total of 447 patients treated at 12 research units for eczema or other inflammatory dermatitis located on the eyelids were invited to complete a questionnaire. When necessary, patch tests with haptens of the standard series from Gruppo Italiano di Ricerca sulle Dermatiti da Contatto e Ambientali della Società Italiana di Dermatologia e Venereologia (SIDEV-GIRDCA) were performed.

Results: Of the subjects studied, 50.2 % were diagnosed with allergic contact dermatitis (ACD); 20.9% were affected by irritant contact dermatitis (ICD), 13.5% by atopic dermatitis, 6.3% by seborrheic dermatitis, 6.5% by aspecific xerotic dermatitis, and 2.3% by psoriasis. Approximately 91% of all subjects reported an absence of familial atopy. A significant statistical association between diagnosis type and a personal history of atopy was evident (p <.000001, chi-square test). The results of gradual logistic regression models showed four-eyelid involvement as the main risk factor for ACD (odds ratio [OR] = 3.0; 95% CI, 1.1-8.1); with ICD, the main risk factor was the onset of symptoms at between 2 and 6 months (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.1-4.0), whereas for atopic dermatitis, the main risk factors were the onset of symptoms later than 6 months and a personal history of atopy (OR = 4.9 and 3.6, respectively).

Conclusion: Results suggest that many characteristics of the patients examined can be used for the differential diagnosis of palpebral eczematous dermatitis.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2003

Predictive value of skin color for illness severity in the high-risk newborn.

Pediatr Res 2002 Jan;51(1):100-5

Department of Pediatrics, Obstetrics and Reproduction, University of Siena, Italy.

The relationship between skin color and illness severity in the newborn remains untested. We have evaluated the predictive value of skin color readings for illness severity in a population of high-risk newborn infants. A prospective study was conducted on 107 white newborns in the intensive care unit, which were categorized as either high or low severity of illness, defined by the presence of severe neonatal morbidity. Illness severity was also determined using a Score for Neonatal Acute Physiology (SNAP). Color readings were obtained at 10 different body sites using a portable tristimulus colorimeter during the first 24 h, and color was expressed using the standard CIE L*a*b* system. Skin CIE b* values were significantly lower in the high severity group (p < 0.0001), and a significant inverse correlation with SNAP was observed (r(s) range, -0.37 to -0.71, p < 0.0001). In particular a low b* value for the abdomen was found to be a significant predictor of illness severity (92.6% sensitivity; 96.6% specificity; 96% positive predictive value; 93.7% negative predictive value; adjusted odds ratio, 14.7; 95% confidence interval, 6.4 to 33.8). Our findings indicate that skin color reflects clinical severity in the newborn and that skin colorimetry can accurately identify higher risk infants.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/00006450-200201000-00018DOI Listing
January 2002
-->