Publications by authors named "Maria Gabriela García"

7 Publications

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Paternal and maternal mutations in X-STRs: A GHEP-ISFG collaborative study.

Forensic Sci Int Genet 2020 05 5;46:102258. Epub 2020 Feb 5.

Laboratório de Diagnóstico por DNA (LDD), Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The GHEP-ISFG organized a collaborative study to estimate mutation rates for the markers included in the Investigator Argus X-12 QS kit Qiagen. A total of 16 laboratories gathered data from 1,612 father/mother/daughter trios, which were used to estimate both maternal and paternal mutation rates, when pooled together with other already published data. Data on fathers and mothers' age at the time of birth of the daughter were also available for ∼93 % of the cases. Population analyses were computed considering the genetic information of a subset of 1,327 unrelated daughters, corresponding to 2,654 haplotypes from residents in several regions of five countries: Argentina, Brazil, Ecuador, Portugal and Spain. Genetic differentiation analyses between the population samples from the same country did not reveal signs of significant stratification, although results from Hardy-Weinberg and linkage disequilibrium tests indicated the need of larger studies for Ecuador and Brazilian populations. The high genetic diversity of the markers resulted in a large number of haplotype combinations, showing the need of huge databases for reliable estimates of their frequencies. It should also be noted the high number of new alleles found, many of them not included in the allelic ladders provided with the kit, as very diverse populations were analyzed. The overall estimates for locus specific average mutation rates varied between 7.5E-04 (for DXS7423) and 1.1E-02 (for DXS10135), the latter being a troublesome figure for kinship analyses. Most of the found mutations (∼92 %) are compatible with the gain or loss of a single repeat. Paternal mutation rates showed to be 5.2 times higher than maternal ones. We also found that older fathers were more prone to transmit mutated alleles, having this trend not been observed in the case of the mothers.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fsigen.2020.102258DOI Listing
May 2020

Physiological and neuromotor changes induced by two different stand-walk-sit work rotations.

Ergonomics 2020 Feb 16;63(2):163-174. Epub 2019 Oct 16.

Department of Industrial and Operations Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States.

The potential of rotating postures to alleviate the effects of prolonged standing and sitting postures has been advocated to attenuate the accumulation of muscle fatigue, considered a precursor to musculoskeletal disorders. We aimed to evaluate the effects of two posture rotations, both including standing, walking, sitting, on physiological and neuromotor measures. Twenty-two participants followed two posture rotations, with different rest-break distributions, for 5.25 h. Lower-leg muscle twitch force, volume, force control and discomfort perception were evaluated during and after work exposure on two non-consecutive days. Significant changes in all measures indicate a detrimental effect in lower-leg long-lasting muscle fatigue, oedema, performance and discomfort after 5 h for both exposures. However, for both exposures recovery was significant 1 h and 15 h post-workday. Differences between the two rotation schedules were not significant. Hence, stand-walk-sit posture rotation promotes recovery of the tested measures and is likely to better prevent muscle fatigue accumulation. Lower-leg muscle twitch force, volume, force control, and discomfort were quantified during and after 5 h of stand-walk-sit work rotations with two different rest-break distributions. Measures revealed similar significant effects of work exposures regardless of rotation; which did not persist post-work. This beneficial recovery contrasts with the standing only situations. MSDs: musculoskeletal disorders; MTF: muscle twitch force; RMSE: root mean square error; MVC: maximum voluntary contraction; : mean; SE: standard error.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2019.1677949DOI Listing
February 2020

Correction to: Lower limb pain among workers: a cross-sectional analysis of the fifth European Working Conditions Survey.

Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2018 07;91(5):655

Sensory-Motor Systems Lab, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zürich, Sonneggstrasse 3, ML G53.2, 8092, Zurich, Switzerland.

The article Lower limb pain among workers: a cross‑sectional analysis of the fifth European Working Conditions Survey.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00420-018-1313-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6002454PMC
July 2018

Muscular and Vascular Issues Induced by Prolonged Standing With Different Work-Rest Cycles With Active or Passive Breaks.

Hum Factors 2018 09 12;60(6):806-821. Epub 2018 Apr 12.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-lasting motor, behavioral, physiological, and perceptual effects of prolonged standing work in three work-rest cycle conditions including passive or active rest breaks.

Background: Muscle fatigue has been evidenced after prolonged standing work through physiological and neuromotor measures. It has been postulated that muscle fatigue induced by prolonged work could be attenuated by appropriate scheduling of work and rest periods. However, investigations in this domain remain limited.

Method: Thirty participants simulated standing work for 5 hr with work-rest cycles of short, medium, or long standing periods including passive or active breaks. Lower-leg muscle twitch force (MTF), muscle oxygenation, lower-leg volume, postural stability, force control, and discomfort perception were quantified on 2 days.

Results: Prolonged standing induced significant changes in all measures immediately after 5 hr of work, indicating a detrimental effect in long-lasting muscle fatigue, performance, discomfort, and vascular aspects. Differences in the measures were not significant between work cycles and/or break type.

Conclusion: Similar physiological and motor alterations were induced by prolonged standing. The absence of difference in the effects induced by the tested work-rest cycles suggests that simply altering the work-rest cycle may not be sufficient to counteract the effects of mainly static standing work. Finally, standing for 3 hr or more shows clear detrimental effects.

Application: Prolonged standing is likely to contribute to musculoskeletal and vascular symptoms. A limitation to less than 3 hr of mostly static standing in occupational activities could avoid alterations leading to these symptoms.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0018720818769261DOI Listing
September 2018

Lower limb pain among workers: a cross-sectional analysis of the fifth European Working Conditions Survey.

Int Arch Occup Environ Health 2017 10 17;90(7):575-585. Epub 2017 Apr 17.

Sensory-Motor Systems Lab, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, ETH Zürich, Sonneggstrasse 3, ML G53.2, 8092, Zurich, Switzerland.

Objective: Develop a model to predict the prevalence of lower limb pain using indicators of high workplace exposures based on the fifth European Working Conditions Survey, evaluate its impact and explore its significance for work-related health problems.

Method: Cross-sectional interview data of 35,372 workers from 27 countries of the European Union in 2010 (EU27) were used to develop (20% sample) and validate (80% sample) a logistic regression model for lower limb pain. Independent variables included descriptions of working conditions, assessments of physical and psychosocial exposures at work, and demographic factors. The impact of the model was explored through the amount of lower limb pain cases attributable to work and estimating work absences correlated with lower limb pain.

Results: The resulting logistic model included ten risks indicators and one preventive factor. The highest odds ratios (OR) corresponded to "tiring or painful positions" OR 2.0, 99% confidence interval (99% CI) 1.9-2.2, and "not satisfied with level of working conditions in the job" (OR 1.6, 99% CI 1.5-1.7). The prevalence of work-related lower limb pain was 16.5% for men and 15.8% for women for the 27 countries of the European Union. Estimates based on the developed model revealed more than 34 million cases of work-related lower limb pain, where four physical risks explained about 22 million cases. In addition, more than 3 million days of absence from work in 2010 could be attributed to lower limb pain.

Conclusion: Lower limb pain is highly prevalent among the European workforce and work exposures are a major contributing factor. Effective workplace interventions should aim at improving working conditions at workplaces with multiple risks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00420-017-1220-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5934451PMC
October 2017

Long-Lasting Changes in Muscle Twitch Force During Simulated Work While Standing or Walking.

Hum Factors 2016 12 9;58(8):1117-1127. Epub 2016 Sep 9.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-lasting effects of prolonged standing work on a hard floor or floor mat and slow-pace walking on muscle twitch force (MTF) elicited by electrical stimulation.

Background: Prolonged standing work may alter lower-leg muscle function, which can be quantified by changes in the MTF amplitude and duration related to muscle fatigue. Ergonomic interventions have been proposed to mitigate fatigue and discomfort; however, their influences remain controversial.

Method: Ten men and eight women simulated standing work in 320-min experiments with three conditions: standing on a hard floor or an antifatigue mat and walking on a treadmill, each including three seated rest breaks. MTF in the gastrocnemius-soleus muscles was evaluated through changes in signal amplitude and duration.

Results: The significant decrease of MTF amplitude and an increase of duration after standing work on a hard floor and on a mat persisted beyond 1 hr postwork. During walking, significant MTF metrics changes appeared 30 min postwork. MTF amplitude decrease was not significant after the first 110 min in any of the conditions; however, MTF duration was significantly higher than baseline in the standing conditions.

Conclusion: Similar long-lasting weakening of MTF was induced by standing on a hard floor and on an antifatigue mat. However, walking partially attenuated this phenomenon.

Application: Mostly static standing is likely to contribute to alterations of MTF in lower-leg muscles and potentially to musculoskeletal disorders regardless of the flooring characteristics. Occupational activities including slow-pace walking may reduce such deterioration in muscle function.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0018720816669444DOI Listing
December 2016

Long-Term Muscle Fatigue After Standing Work.

Hum Factors 2015 Nov 5;57(7):1162-73. Epub 2015 Jun 5.

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Objective: The aims of this study were to determine long-term fatigue effects in the lower limbs associated with standing work and to estimate possible age and gender influences.

Background: The progressive accumulation of muscle fatigue effects is assumed to lead to musculoskeletal disorders, as fatigue generated by sustained low-level exertions exhibits long-lasting effects. However, these effects have received little attention in the lower limbs.

Method: Fourteen men and 12 women from two different age groups simulated standing work for 5 hr including 5-min seated rest breaks and a 30-min lunch. The younger group was also tested in a control day. Muscle fatigue was quantified by electrically induced muscle twitches (muscle twitch force [MTF]), postural stability, and subjective evaluation of discomfort.

Results: MTF showed a significant fatigue effect after standing work that persisted beyond 30 min after the end of the workday. MTF was not affected on the control day. The center of pressure displacement speed increased significantly over time after standing work but was also affected on the control day. Subjective evaluations of discomfort indicated a significant increase in perception of fatigue immediately after the end of standing work; however, this perception did not persist 30 min after. Age and gender did not influence fatigue.

Conclusion: Objective measures show the long-term effects of muscle fatigue after 5 hr of standing work; however, this fatigue is no longer perceived after 30 min of rest postwork.

Application: The present results suggest that occupational activities requiring prolonged standing are likely to contribute to lower-extremity and/or back disorders.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0018720815590293DOI Listing
November 2015