Publications by authors named "Maria Efthymia Katsa"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Association of the apoptotic marker APO1/Fas with children's predisposing factors for metabolic syndrome and with mean platelet volume.

J Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2021 Aug 2. Epub 2021 Aug 2.

Laboratory of Biology and Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Department of Nursing, University of Peloponnese, Tripoli, Greece.

Background: Apoptosis antigen 1/FAS receptor (APO1/Fas) signaling in endothelial cells plays a significant role in angiogenesis while increased mean platelet volume (MPV) is an important marker for platelet activation. We investigated the possible correlation between APO1/Fas and both metabolic parameters and platelet activity (indicated by the MPV) in a healthy pediatric population.

Methods: One hundred and eighty-five children, aged 5-17 years old, were enrolled in the study. The participants were divided into subgroups according to their age and body mass index percentile (BMI%). APO1/Fas was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and MPV by the MEK-6410K.

Results: Eighty-one children (43.8%) had excess weight, which was more prevalent in children ≤9 years of age. Sixty-five children (35.1%) exhibited a predisposition for metabolic syndrome. A negative correlation was found between APO1/Fas and predisposing factors for metabolic syndrome: Glucose, cholesterol, uric acid, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and triglycerides. In contrast, a positive correlation was found between APO1/Fas and C-reactive protein (CRP). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed a predisposition to metabolic syndrome when APO1/Fas was <78.46 pg/mL. A negative correlation was also observed between APO1/Fas and MPV. MPV was also positively correlated with predisposing factors for metabolic syndrome: BMI%, glucose, cholesterol, uric acid, LDL, and negatively with high-density lipoprotein.

Conclusions: APO1/Fas expression is associated with a lower predisposition to metabolic syndrome may be through endothelial homeostasis, the induction of apoptosis of cells involved in atherosclerosis, and platelet activity. It may also enhance CRP-mediated noninflammatory clearance of apoptotic cells. Early monitoring of all the components of metabolic syndrome in overweight children is important in order to prevent metabolic and cardiovascular complications.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpem-2021-0352DOI Listing
August 2021

The roles of triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio and uric acid as predisposing factors for metabolic syndrome in healthy children.

Ann Pediatr Endocrinol Metab 2019 Sep 30;24(3):172-179. Epub 2019 Sep 30.

Department of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Peloponnese, Tripolis, Greece.

Purpose: To estimate the roles of triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TG/HDL) ratio and uric acid in predisposition for metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in healthy children.

Methods: Anthropometric and biochemical analyses were performed on 110 children, aged 5 to 12 years, from the Greek county of Laconia. The children were studied as a whole population and in separate groups according to age and predisposition to MetS after taking into consideration International Diabetes Federation criteria, body mass index, and lipid profile.

Results: Seventeen percent of children exhibited predisposition to MetS, while 39.1% had TG/HDL ratio >1, and 3.64% had high level of uric acid. According to a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the relative probability for MetS predisposition sextupled when TG/HDL ratio was ≥1 (odds ratio [OR], 5.986; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.968-18.205). Children in the total population and those aged < 9 years had a greater probability for increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (OR, 3.614; 95% CI, 1.561-8.365) when TG/HDL ratio was ≥ 1. The TG/HDL ratio was positively correlated with body mass index (BMI) (P=0.035) in children without MetS, cholesterol in the total population (P=0.06) and children ≥9 years old (P=0.026), and with LDL in the total population and both age groups (P=0.001). The TG/HDL ratio was also positively correlated with alanine aminotransferase in the total population (P=0.033) and gamma-glutamyl transferase in most studied groups (P<0.001). Uric acid was positively correlated with waist circumference in the total population (P=0.043) and in those without MetS (P=0.027). It was also positively correlated with BMI, TG, cholesterol, and TG/HDL ratio and negatively correlated with HDL in most studied groups (P<0.005).

Conclusion: The studied parameters correlated with MetS components and could be characterized as effective indexes for childhood MetS, regardless of age and predisposition to MetS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.6065/apem.2019.24.3.172DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6790870PMC
September 2019

The Effect of Nutrition and Sleep Habits on Predisposition for Metabolic Syndrome in Greek Children.

J Pediatr Nurs 2018 May - Jun;40:e2-e8. Epub 2018 May 7.

Department of Nursing, Faculty of Human Movement and Quality of Life Sciences, University of Peloponnese, Sparta, Greece. Electronic address:

Purpose: To investigate the effect of lifestyle habits in childhood Metabolic Syndrome (MTS).

Design And Methods: Descriptive correlation study with 480 participants (5-12 years old) using a specially designed questionnaire was conducted. Anthropometric and biochemical analyses were performed.

Results: Fifteen percent of children exhibited predisposition for MTS. Regarding sleep habits, logistic regression analysis (LRA) showed that hour of sleep -before 22:00- was associated with decreased waist circumference (WC%) (p = .026). Midday siesta was negatively correlated with systolic (SBP) (p = .001) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (p = .046). In children without MTS, lack of sleep and night time sleep was positively correlated with DBP (p = .044) and fasting blood glucose (FBG) (p = .005). Regarding nutrition habits, fast food consumption was positively correlated with SBP (p = .006) and meat consumption was positively correlated with both Body Mass Index% (BMI%) (p = .038) and WC% (p = .023). LRA showed that fruit (p = .001) and legume (p = .040) consumption was associated with decreased FBG; fish consumption with decreased Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (p = .031), vegetable (p = .054) and cereal consumption (p = .012) with decreased DBP. In children with MTS, fruits were associated with increased FBG (p = .034). In children without MTS, meat consumption was associated with increased LDL (p = .024), cereal with increased WC% (p = .002) and olive products with increased High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and BMI% (p = .037).

Conclusions: The adoption of both balanced diet and sleep habits seemed to be crucial for the prevention of MTS.

Practice Implications: Clinical health nurses could develop and implement preventive intervention programs in order to avoid metabolic complications in adulthood.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedn.2018.01.012DOI Listing
October 2018

Correlations Between Nutrition Habits, Anxiety and Metabolic Parameters in Greek Healthy Adults.

Adv Exp Med Biol 2017 ;987:23-34

Faculty of Human Movement and Quality of Life Sciences, Department of Nursing, Efstathiou & Stamatikis Valioti and Plateon, University of Peloponnese, Sparti, 23100, Greece.

Background: Anxiety combined with nervousness and apprehension consist a focal response to different life conditions. Lifestyle habits, anxiety and biochemical markers are in a constant interaction.

Aim: To investigate the prevalence of anxiety in healthy adults and its possible association with biochemical factors-lipid profile, liver markers, thyroid hormones-and lifestyle habits.

Methods: Quantitative descriptive correlation study. A total of 100 healthy adults participated in the research. A specially designed questionnaire and Hamilton's scale were used. Anthropometric and biochemical analyses were performed.

Findings: Overall, 61% of the participants presented moderate to very serious anxiety. The average score on the Hamilton scale was 13.82 (±9.000), with men exhibiting less stress than women. For p ≤ 0.05: Stress was positively correlated with impaired thyroid and hepatic function. Hepatic function was affected by both sugar products and water melon, which were positively correlated with total bilirubin and AST/SGOT respectively. Tomato, peppers and legumes were negatively correlated with AST/SGOT. Deep fried food was positively correlated with GGT and triglycerides. Legumes and fish were negatively correlated with CPK. Regarding the lipid metabolism, it was found that food cooked with oil was positively associated with uric acid, but non-cooked olive oil was negatively correlated with the risk for CAD. Thyroid function was negatively correlated with non-homemade food and pasta consumption and positively correlated with consumption of whole grains and green tea. Participants with subclinical hypothyroidism seemed to consume less vitamin B12, folic acid and vegetables.

Conclusion: No direct correlation between lifestyle habits and anxiety was found. Nevertheless, eating habits influenced biochemical markers-especially the thyroid hormones-which may be indirectly responsible for anxiety and related moods.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-57379-3_3DOI Listing
April 2018
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