Publications by authors named "Maria Daniela Artigas Ramirez"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Genetic Diversity and Characterization of Symbiotic Bacteria Isolated from Endemic Phaseolus Cultivars Located in Contrasting Agroecosystems in Venezuela.

Microbes Environ 2021 ;36(2)

Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT).

Phaseolus vulgaris is a grain cultivated in vast areas of different countries. It is an excellent alternative to the other legumes in the Venezuelan diet and is of great agronomic interest due to its resistance to soil acidity, drought, and high temperatures. Phaseolus establishes symbiosis primarily with Rhizobium and Ensifer species in most countries, and this rhizobia-legume interaction has been studied in Asia, Africa, and the Americas. However, there is currently no evidence to show that rhizobia nodulate the endemic cultivars of P. vulgaris in Venezuela. Therefore, we herein investigated the phylogenetic diversity of plant growth-promoting and N-fixing nodulating bacteria isolated from the root nodules of P. vulgaris cultivars in a different agroecosystem in Venezuela. In comparisons with other countries, higher diversity was found in isolates from P. vulgaris nodules, ranging from α- and β-proteobacteria. Some isolates belonging to several new phylogenetic lineages within Bradyrhizobium, Ensifer, and Mesorhizobium species were also specifically isolated at some topographical regions. Additionally, some isolates exhibited tolerance to high temperature, acidity, alkaline pH, salinity stress, and high Al levels; some of these characteristics may be related to the origin of the isolates. Some isolates showed high tolerance to Al toxicity as well as strong plant growth-promoting and antifungal activities, thereby providing a promising agricultural resource for inoculating crops.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1264/jsme2.ME20157DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8209454PMC
September 2021

Characterization of Rhizobia for the Improvement of Soybean Cultivation at Cold Conditions in Central Europe.

Microbes Environ 2020 ;35(1)

Institute of Global Innovation Research (GIR), Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology.

In central Europe, soybean cultivation is gaining increasing importance to reduce protein imports from overseas and make cropping systems more sustainable. In the field, despite the inoculation of soybean with commercial rhizobia, its nodulation is low. In many parts of Europe, limited information is currently available on the genetic diversity of rhizobia and, thus, biological resources for selecting high nitrogen-fixing rhizobia are inadequate. These resources are urgently needed to improve soybean production in central Europe. The objective of the present study was to identify strains that have the potential to increase nitrogen fixation by and the yield of soybean in German soils. We isolated and characterized 77 soybean rhizobia from 18 different sampling sites. Based on a multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), 71% of isolates were identified as Bradyrhizobium and 29% as Rhizobium. A comparative analysis of the nodD and nifH genes showed no significant differences, which indicated that the soybean rhizobia symbiotic genes in the present study belong to only one type. One isolate, GMF14 which was tolerant of a low temperature (4°C), exhibited higher nitrogen fixation in root nodules and a greater plant biomass than USDA 110 under cold conditions. These results strongly suggest that some indigenous rhizobia enhance biological nitrogen fixation and soybean yield due to their adaption to local conditions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1264/jsme2.ME19124DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7104276PMC
March 2020

Phylogenetic Analysis of Symbiotic Bacteria Associated with Two Vigna Species under Different Agro-Ecological Conditions in Venezuela.

Microbes Environ 2020 ;35(1)

Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT).

Vigna is a genus of legumes cultivated in specific areas of tropical countries. Species in this genus are important crops worldwide. Vigna species are of great agronomic interest in Venezuela because Vigna beans are an excellent alternative to other legumes. However, this type of crop has some cultivation issues due to sensitivity to acidic soils, high temperatures, and salinity stress, which are common in Venezuela. Vigna species establish symbioses mainly with Bradyrhizobium and Ensifer, and Vigna-rhizobia interactions have been examined in Asia, Africa, and America. However, the identities of the rhizobia associated with V. radiata and V. unguiculata in Venezuela remain unknown. In the present study, we isolated Venezuelan symbiotic rhizobia associated with Vigna species from soils with contrasting agroecosystems or from fields in Venezuela. Several types of soils were used for bacterial isolation and nodules were sampled from environments characterized by abiotic stressors, such as high temperatures, high concentrations of NaCl, and acidic or alkaline pH. Venezuelan Vigna-rhizobia were mainly fast-growing. Sequencing of several housekeeping genes showed that in contrast to other continents, Venezuelan Vigna species were nodulated by rhizobia genus including Burkholderia, containing bacteria from several new phylogenetic lineages within the genus Bradyrhizobium. Some Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium isolates were tolerant of high salinity and Al toxicity. The stress tolerance of strains was dependent on the type of rhizobia, soil origin, and cultivation history. An isolate classified as R. phaseoli showed the highest plant biomass, nitrogen fixation, and excellent abiotic stress response, suggesting a novel promising inoculant for Vigna cultivation in Venezuela.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1264/jsme2.ME19120DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7104274PMC
January 2020

Isolation and Screening of Indigenous Plant Growth-promoting Rhizobacteria from Different Rice Cultivars in Afghanistan Soils.

Microbes Environ 2019 Dec 14;34(4):347-355. Epub 2019 Sep 14.

Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology.

To develop biofertilizers for rice in Afghanistan, 98 plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria were isolated from rice plants and their morphological and physiological characteristics, such as indole-3-acetic acid production, acetylene reduction, phosphate and potassium solubilization, and siderophore production, were evaluated. The genetic diversity of these bacteria was also analyzed based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. Of 98 bacteria, 89.7% produced IAA, 54.0% exhibited nitrogenase activity, and 40% showed phosphate solubilization and siderophore production. Some isolates assigned to Pseudomonas (brassicacearum, chengduensis, plecoglossicida, resinovorans, and straminea) formed a relationship with rice, and P. resinovorans and P. straminea showed nitrogen fixation. Rhizobium borbori and R. rosettiformans showed a relationship with rice plants and nitrogen fixation. Among the isolates examined, AF134 and AF137 belonging to Enterobacter ludwigii and P. putida produced large amounts of IAA (92.3 μg mL) and exhibited high nitrogenase activity (647.4 nmol CH h), respectively. In the plant growth test, more than 70% of the inoculated isolates showed significantly increased root and shoot dry weights. Highly diverse bacterial isolates showing promising rice growth-promoting traits were obtained from Afghanistan alkaline soils.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1264/jsme2.ME18168DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6934389PMC
December 2019

Burkholderia and Paraburkholderia are Predominant Soybean Rhizobial Genera in Venezuelan Soils in Different Climatic and Topographical Regions.

Microbes Environ 2019 Mar 15;34(1):43-58. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Institute of Agriculture, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT).

The climate, topography, fauna, and flora of Venezuela are highly diverse. However, limited information is currently available on the characterization of soybean rhizobia in Venezuela. To clarify the physiological and genetic diversities of soybean rhizobia in Venezuela, soybean root nodules were collected from 11 soil types located in different topographical regions. A total of 395 root nodules were collected and 120 isolates were obtained. All isolates were classified in terms of stress tolerance under different concentrations of NaCl and Al. The tolerance levels of isolates to NaCl and Al varied. Based on sampling origins and stress tolerance levels, 44 isolates were selected for further characterization. An inoculation test indicated that all isolates showed the capacity for root nodulation on soybean. Based on multilocus sequence typing (MLST), 20 isolates were classified into the genera Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium. The remaining 24 isolates were classified into the genus Burkholderia or Paraburkholderia. There is currently no evidence to demonstrate that the genera Burkholderia and Paraburkholderia are the predominant soybean rhizobia in agricultural fields. Of the 24 isolates classified in (Para) Burkholderia, the nodD-nodB intergenic spacer regions of 10 isolates and the nifH gene sequences of 17 isolates were closely related to the genera Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium, respectively. The root nodulation numbers of five (Para) Burkholderia isolates were higher than those of the 20 α-rhizobia. Furthermore, among the 44 isolates tested, one Paraburkholderia isolate exhibited the highest nitrogen-fixation activity in root nodules.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1264/jsme2.ME18076DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6440732PMC
March 2019
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