Publications by authors named "Maria Cristina Leone"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Drug plasma level measurement in management of severe bleeding during direct oral anticoagulant treatment: case report and perspective.

Intern Emerg Med 2018 10 3;13(7):1093-1096. Epub 2018 May 3.

Alta Intensità Medica, Department of Internal Medicine, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova - IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11739-018-1858-2DOI Listing
October 2018

[Infected pressure ulcers: evaluation and management].

Infez Med 2009 Sep;17 Suppl 4:88-94

Medicina Interna, Centro Emostasi e Trombosi, Stroke Unit, Azienda Ospedaliera ASMN di Reggio Emilia, Italy.

Pressure ulcers in elderly individuals can cause significant morbidity and mortality and are a major economic burden to the health care system. Prevention should be the ultimate objective of pressure ulcer care, and it requires an understanding of the pathophysiology leading to pressure ulcers and the means of reducing both intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Clinical examination often underestimates the degree of deep-tissue involvement, and its findings are inadequate for the detection of associated osteomyelitis. Microbiological data, if obtained from deep-tissue biopsy, are useful for directing antimicrobial therapy, but they are insufficient as the sole criterion for the diagnosis of infection. Imaging studies, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, are useful, but bone biopsy and histopathological evaluation remain the "gold standard" for the detection of osteomyelitis. The goals of treatment of pressure ulcers should be resolution of infection and promotion of wound healing. A combination of surgical debridement and medical interventions may be required. Systemic antimicrobial therapy should be used for patients with serious pressure ulcers infections, including those with spreading cellulitis, bacteremia or osteomyelitis.
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September 2009

The mechanism of nitrate-induced preconditioning.

Clin Hemorheol Microcirc 2008 ;39(1-4):191-6

Department of Internal, Cardiovascular and Geriatric Medicine, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

Nitroglycerin (GTN) has been shown, in both human and animal studies, to induce a protective phenotype that limits tissue damage after ischemia and reperfusion. This phenomenon is similar to ischemic preconditioning, and several reports suggest that also the molecular pathways involved in this protective effect of nitrates are the same that determine ischemic preconditioning. Our group conducted a series of studies aimed at investigating, using a human model of endothelial IR injury, the mechanism of nitrate-induced preconditioning and particularly the role of reactive oxygen species formation and of the opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores. Our data demonstrate that GTN protects the endothelium against postischemic endothelial dysfunction in a mechanism that is mediated by oxygen free radical release and opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pores. In contrast, the protective effect of pentaerithrityl tetranitrate appears to be independent of these mechanisms, and it seems to be mediated by induction of antioxidant genes. Finally, isosorbide mononitrate seems to be devoid of a significant protective effect. These data are summarized and discussed in the present paper.
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August 2008

The coronary slow flow phenomenon: a new cardiac "Y" syndrome?

Clin Hemorheol Microcirc 2008 ;39(1-4):185-90

Department of Internal Cardiovascular and Geriatric Medicine, and U.O.Emodinamica, University of Siena, Siena, Italy.

The coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) is an angiographic finding that is characterised by delayed progression of the contrast medium during coronary angiography. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. In the present paper, we revise the current evidence regarding this phenomenon and discuss recent findings from our group reporting increased resting resistances in patients with the CSFP. We report that these patients had preserved blood flow responses to the intracoronary infusion of the vasodilator papaverine, demonstrating that the CSFP is not necessarily associated with an abnormal coronary flow reserve. Based on these findings and on the review of the current literature, we concur with the concept proposed by Beltrame et al. that the CSFP should be considered a separate clinical entity. Further studies are necessary to describe the clinical characteristics, including the prognosis, of these patients and to identify potential treatments.
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August 2008