Publications by authors named "Maria C Falco"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

SacRALF1, a peptide signal from the grass sugarcane (Saccharum spp.), is potentially involved in the regulation of tissue expansion.

Plant Mol Biol 2010 Jun 11;73(3):271-81. Epub 2010 Feb 11.

Departamento de Genética, Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 83, Piracicaba, SP, Brazil.

Rapid alkalinization factor (RALF) is part of a growing family of small peptides with hormone characteristics in plants. Initially isolated from leaves of tobacco plants, RALF peptides can be found throughout the plant kingdom and they are expressed ubiquitously in plants. We took advantage of the small gene family size of RALF genes in sugarcane and the ordered cellular growth of the grass sugarcane leaves to gain information about the function of RALF peptides in plants. Here we report the isolation of two RALF peptides from leaves of sugarcane plants using the alkalinization assay. SacRALF1 was the most abundant and, when added to culture media, inhibited growth of microcalli derived from cell suspension cultures at concentrations as low as 0.1 microM. Microcalli exposed to exogenous SacRALF1 for 5 days showed a reduced number of elongated cells. Only four copies of SacRALF genes were found in sugarcane plants. All four SacRALF genes are highly expressed in young and expanding leaves and show a low or undetectable level of expression in expanded leaves. In half-emerged leaf blades, SacRALF transcripts were found at high levels at the basal portion of the leaf and at low levels at the apical portion. Gene expression analyzes localize SacRALF genes in elongation zones of roots and leaves. Mature leaves, which are devoid of expanding cells, do not show considerable expression of SacRALF genes. Our findings are consistent with SacRALF genes playing a role in plant development potentially regulating tissue expansion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11103-010-9613-8DOI Listing
June 2010

Transcriptionally active transposable elements in recent hybrid sugarcane.

Plant J 2005 Dec;44(5):707-17

Departamento de Botânica, IB-USP, São Paulo, Brazil.

Transposable elements (TEs) are considered to be important components of the maintenance and diversification of genomes. The recent increase in genome sequence data has created an opportunity to evaluate the impact of these active mobile elements on the evolution of plant genomes. Analysis of the sugarcane transcriptome identified 267 clones with significant similarity to previously described plant TEs. After full cDNA sequencing, 68 sugarcane TE clones were assigned to 11 families according to their best sequence alignment against a fully characterized element. Expression was further investigated through a combined study utilizing electronic Northerns, macroarray, transient and stable sugarcane transformation. Newly synthesized cDNA probes from flower, leaf roll, apical meristem and callus tissues confirm previous results. Callus was identified as the tissue with the highest number of TEs being expressed, revealing that tissue culture drastically induced the expression of different elements. No tissue-specific family was identified. Different representatives within a TE family displayed differential expression patterns, showing that each family presented expression in almost every tissue. Transformation experiments demonstrated that most Hopscotch clone-derived U3 regions are, indeed, active promoters, although under a strong transcriptional regulation. This is a large-scale study about the expression pattern of TEs and indicates that mobile genetic elements are transcriptionally active in the highly polyploid and complex sugarcane genome.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-313X.2005.02579.xDOI Listing
December 2005