Publications by authors named "Maria Bravo Araya"

2 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Bovine Adenovirus-3 Tropism for Bovine Leukocyte Sub-Populations.

Viruses 2020 12 12;12(12). Epub 2020 Dec 12.

VIDO-InterVac., 120 Veterinary Road, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E3, Canada.

A number of characteristics including lack of virulence and the ability to grow to high titers, have made bovine adenovirus-3 (BAdV-3) a vector of choice for further development as a vaccine-delivery vehicle for cattle. Despite the importance of blood leukocytes, including dendritic cells (DC), in the induction of protective immune responses, little is known about the interaction between BAdV-3 and bovine blood leukocytes. Here, we demonstrate that compared to other leukocytes, bovine blood monocytes and neutrophils are significantly transduced by BAdV404a (BAdV-3, expressing enhanced yellow green fluorescent protein [EYFP]) at a MOI of 1-5 without a significant difference in the mean fluorescence of EYFP expression. Moreover, though expression of some BAdV-3-specific proteins was observed, no progeny virions were detected in the transduced monocytes or neutrophils. Interestingly, addition of the "RGD" motif at the C-terminus of BAdV-3 minor capsid protein pIX (BAV888) enhanced the ability of the virus to enter the monocytes without altering the tropism of BAdV-3. The increased uptake of BAV888 by monocytes was associated with a significant increase in viral genome copies and the abundance of EYFP and BAdV-3 19K transcripts compared to BAdV404a-transduced monocytes. Our results suggest that BAdV-3 efficiently transduces monocytes and neutrophils in the absence of viral replication. Moreover, RGD-modified capsid significantly increases vector uptake without affecting the initial interaction with monocytes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/v12121431DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7763465PMC
December 2020

Combating Vaccine Hesitancy: Teaching the Next Generation to Navigate Through the Post Truth Era.

Front Public Health 2018 14;6:381. Epub 2019 Jan 14.

Dahlem Research School, Biomedical Science, Freie Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany.

Despite scientific evidence supporting the fact that vaccines are fundamental tools for preventing infectious diseases, a percentage of the population still refuses some or all of them. Vaccine hesitancy has become a widespread issue, and its complexity lies in the great variety of factors that can influence decisions about immunization, which are not just vaccine-related concerns, but also involve personal and societal levels. Our research group performed an extensive literature review to analyze: (1) different age groups, their relation to the problem and their characteristics; (2) the most important information (key messages) about immunization that could be used to counteract hesitancy; and (3) best approaches to transmit the messages to the target groups. We propose a long-term approach to overcome vaccine hesitancy that involves the education of children and adolescents on the basics about immunization and critical thinking, using different communication channels.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2018.00381DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6339919PMC
January 2019