Publications by authors named "Maria Bosserdt"

8 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Detection of relevant extracardiac findings on coronary computed tomography angiography vs. invasive coronary angiography.

Eur Radiol 2021 Jun 15. Epub 2021 Jun 15.

Department of Radiology, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Charitéplatz 1, 10117, Berlin, Germany.

Objectives: To compare the detection of relevant extracardiac findings (ECFs) on coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) and invasive coronary angiography (ICA) and evaluate the potential clinical benefit of their detection.

Methods: This is the prespecified subanalysis of ECFs in patients presenting with a clinical indication for ICA based on atypical angina and suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) included in the prospective single-center randomized controlled Coronary Artery Disease Management (CAD-Man) study. ECFs requiring immediate therapy and/or further workup including additional imaging were defined as clinically relevant. We evaluated the scope of ECFs in 329 patients and analyzed the potential clinical benefit of their detection.

Results: ECFs were detected in 107 of 329 patients (32.5%; CTA: 101/167, 60.5%; ICA: 6/162, 3.7%; p < .001). Fifty-nine patients had clinically relevant ECFs (17.9%; CTA: 55/167, 32.9%; ICA: 4/162, 2.5%; p < .001). In the CTA group, ECFs potentially explained atypical chest pain in 13 of 101 patients with ECFs (12.9%). After initiation of therapy, chest pain improved in 4 (4.0%) and resolved in 7 patients (6.9%). Follow-up imaging was recommended in 33 (10.0%; CTA: 30/167, 18.0%; ICA: 3/162, 1.9%) and additional clinic consultation in 26 patients (7.9%; CTA: 25/167, 15.0%; ICA: 1/162, 0.6%). Malignancy was newly diagnosed in one patient (0.3%; CTA: 1/167, 0.6%; ICA: 0).

Conclusions: In this randomized study, CTA but not ICA detected clinically relevant ECFs that may point to possible other causes of chest pain in patients without CAD. Thus, CTA might preclude the need for ICA in those patients.

Trial Registration: NCT Unique ID: 00844220 KEY POINTS: • CTA detects ten times more clinically relevant ECFs than ICA. • Actionable clinically relevant ECFs affect patient management and therapy and may thus improve chest pain. • Detection of ECFs explaining chest pain on CTA might preclude the need for performing ICA.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-021-07967-xDOI Listing
June 2021

Kidney Injury after Intravenous versus Intra-arterial Contrast Agent in Patients Suspected of Having Coronary Artery Disease: A Randomized Trial.

Radiology 2019 09 2;292(3):664-672. Epub 2019 Jul 2.

From the Department of Radiology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität and Freie Universität zu Berlin, Schumannstr 20/21, Berlin 10117, Germany (E.S., M.B., E.Z., R.T, M.L., M.D.); and Institute for Clinical Epidemiology and Applied Biometry, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany (P.M.).

Background In the absence of randomized studies, it has been controversial whether the likelihood of acute kidney injury (AKI) differs between intravenous and intra-arterial contrast agent administration. Purpose To compare intravenous versus intra-arterial contrast agent administration in relationship to AKI and analyze the association between AKI and chronic kidney disease (defined as at least mildly decreased estimated glomerular filtration rates [eGFRs]). Materials and Methods This was a prospective study (: NCT00844220) that involved randomizing participants with atypical chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) between February 2009 and August 2015 to undergo coronary CT angiography with intravenous contrast agent administration or cardiac catheterization angiography with intra-arterial contrast agent administration. This prespecified secondary analysis compared AKI (serum creatinine increase of ≥ 25% or 0.5 mg/dL after 18-24 or 46-50 hours) determined by blinded investigators using absolute differences and relative risks, including two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results A total of 320 participants (163 [50.9%] women; mean age, 60 years ± 11) were included. Baseline eGFR did not differ between the CT angiography group (84.3 mL/min/1.73 m ± 17.2) and the catheterization group (87.1 mL/min/1.73 m ± 16.7) ( = .14). AKI occurred in nine of 161 participants in the CT angiography group (5.6%; 95% CI: 3%, 10%) and in 21 of 159 participants in the catheterization group (13.2%; 95% CI: 9%,19%) (relative risk, 2.4; 95% CI: 1.1, 5.0; = .02). Also in the subgroup of participants without obstructive CAD, in those not requiring coronary interventions, AKI was more common in the catheterization group (11.9%; 95% CI: 8%, 19%) than in the CT angiography group (4.3% [95% CI: 2%, 9%]; difference, 7.7% [95% CI: 1.3%, 14.1%]; relative risk, 2.8 [95% CI: 1.1, 7.0]; = .02). Obstructive CAD (odds ratio [OR]: 2.7 [95% CI: 1.1, 6.6]; = .02), femoral catheter access (OR: 2.5 [95% CI: 1.1, 5.6]; = .04), and cine ventriculography were associated with AKI (OR: 2.3 [95% CI: 1.0, 4.9]; = .03). In multivariable analysis, the presence of postcontrast AKI was associated with chronic kidney disease (hazard ratio: 12.4 [95% CI: 4.5, 34.6]; < .01). Conclusion Acute kidney injury was more common after cardiac catheterization than after CT angiography in this prospective randomized study of patients suspected of having coronary artery disease. © RSNA, 2019 See also the editorial by Einstein and Newhouse in this issue.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2019182220DOI Listing
September 2019

Clinical Imaging Research: Higher Evidence, Global Collaboration, Improved Reporting, and Data Sharing Are the Grand Challenges.

Radiology 2019 06 2;291(3):547-552. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

From the Department of Radiology, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Humboldt-Universität and Freie Universität zu Berlin, Schumannstr 20/21, Berlin 10117, Germany (M.D., M.B.); Berlin Institute of Health, Berlin, Germany (M.D., S.T.); Department of Radiology, St. Vincent's University Hospital School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland (J.D.D.); and Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard University, Boston, Mass (H.Y.K.).

The four grand challenges of imaging research—increasing evidence levels, enhancing global collaboration, improving research reporting quality, and sharing trial data—can be addressed, utilizing the tail wind of digital transformation, by consolidating actions of all stakeholders, with the ultimate goal of evidence-based, reproducible, generalizable, and broadly accepted results that will improve the quality and consistency of patient care.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2019181796DOI Listing
June 2019

Clinical trials in radiology and data sharing: results from a survey of the European Society of Radiology (ESR) research committee.

Eur Radiol 2019 Sep 27;29(9):4794-4802. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Department of Radiology, Charite Medical School, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Freie Universitat Berlin, Chariteplatz 1, 10117, Berlin, Germany.

Objectives: To determine the current situation and future directions of clinical trials and data sharing in radiology.

Methods: This survey was conducted between July and September 2018 among European heads of imaging departments and speakers at the Clinical Trials in Radiology sessions at ECR 2015-2018. The survey was approved by the ESR research committee, was administered online, and chi-square tests were used.

Results: The overall response rate was 29% (132/460). Responses were received from institutions in 29 countries. These institutions reported having conducted 429 trials, leading to 332 publications, of which 43% were first and 44% were last authorships by those institutions. For future trials, 98% of respondents (93/95) said they would be interested in sharing data, although only 34% had shared data already (23/68, p < 0.001). The major barriers to data sharing were data protection (78%, 74/95), ethical issues (49%, 47/95), and the lack of a data sharing platform (49%, 47/95). Of the respondents, 89% believed a platform would facilitate data sharing (85/95 vs. 10/95 did not, p < 0.001) and should offer easy data uploading (74%, 70/95), data safety (66%, 63/95), easy communication between providers and re-users (62%, 59/95), and data access policies (56%, 53/95).

Conclusion: A considerable number of imaging trials are being performed and published by radiologists in Europe whilst data sharing is hardly taking place, despite great interest. This is most likely due to data protection and ethical issues, as well as the absence of a data sharing platform.

Key Points: • Radiologists have performed a considerable number of more than 400 imaging trials in the last 5 years. • Although only 34% of institutions had shared trial data already, 98% are interested in doing so. • Major data sharing barriers are ethics, data protection, and the absence of a sharing platform.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-019-06105-yDOI Listing
September 2019

Microelectrospotting as a new method for electrosynthesis of surface-imprinted polymer microarrays for protein recognition.

Biosens Bioelectron 2015 Nov 27;73:123-129. Epub 2015 May 27.

Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Szent Gellért tér 4, H-1111 Budapest, Hungary; MTA-BME "Lendület" Chemical Nanosensors Research Group, Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Szent Gellért tér 4, H-1111 Budapest, Hungary. Electronic address:

Here we introduce microelectrospotting as a new approach for preparation of protein-selective molecularly imprinted polymer microarrays on bare gold SPR imaging chips. During electrospotting both the gold chip and the spotting tip are electrically connected to a potentiostat as working and counter electrodes, respectively. The spotting pin encloses the monomer-template protein cocktail that upon contacting the gold surface is in-situ electropolymerized resulting in surface confined polymer spots of ca. 500 µm diameter. By repeating this procedure at preprogrammed locations for various composition monomer-template mixtures microarrays of nanometer-thin surface-imprinted films are generated in a controlled manner. We show that the removal and rebinding kinetics of the template and various potential interferents to such microarrays can be monitored in real-time and multiplexed manner by SPR imaging. The proof of principle for microelectrospotting of electrically insulating surface-imprinted films is made by using scopoletin as monomer and ferritin as protein template. It is shown that microelectrospotting in combination with SPR imaging can offer a versatile platform for label-free and enhanced throughput optimization of the molecularly imprinted polymers for protein recognition and for their analytical application.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bios.2015.05.049DOI Listing
November 2015

Modulation of direct electron transfer of cytochrome c by use of a molecularly imprinted thin film.

Anal Bioanal Chem 2013 Aug 10;405(20):6437-44. Epub 2013 May 10.

Institute of Biochemistry and Biology, University of Potsdam, Golm, Germany.

We describe the preparation of a molecularly imprinted polymer film (MIP) on top of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) on gold, where the template cytochrome c (cyt c) participates in direct electron transfer (DET) with the underlying electrode. To enable DET, a non-conductive polymer film is electrodeposited from an aqueous solution of scopoletin and cyt c on to the surface of a gold electrode previously modified with MUA. The electroactive surface concentration of cyt c was 0.5 pmol cm(-2). In the absence of the MUA layer, no cyt c DET was observed and the pseudo-peroxidatic activity of the scopoletin-entrapped protein, assessed via oxidation of Ampliflu red in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, was only 30% of that for the MIP on MUA. This result indicates that electrostatic adsorption of cyt c by the MUA-SAM substantially increases the surface concentration of cyt c during the electrodeposition step, and is a prerequisite for the productive orientation required for DET. After template removal by treatment with sulfuric acid, rebinding of cyt c to the MUA-MIP-modified electrode occurred with an affinity constant of 100,000 mol(-1) L, a value three times higher than that determined by use of fluorescence titration for the interaction between scopoletin and cyt c in solution. The DET of cyt c in the presence of myoglobin, lysozyme, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) reveals that the MIP layer suppresses the effect of competing proteins.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00216-013-7009-8DOI Listing
August 2013

Peroxide-dependent analyte conversion by the heme prosthetic group, the heme Peptide "microperoxidase-11" and cytochrome C on chitosan capped gold nanoparticles modified electrodes.

Biosensors (Basel) 2012 May 14;2(2):189-204. Epub 2012 May 14.

Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering, IBMT, D-14476 Potsdam, Germany.

In view of the role ascribed to the peroxidatic activity of degradation products of cytochrome c (cyt c) in the processes of apoptosis, we investigate the catalytic potential of heme and of the cyt c derived heme peptide MP-11 to catalyse the cathodic reduction of hydrogen peroxide and to oxidize aromatic compounds. In order to check whether cyt c has an enzymatic activity in the native state where the protein matrix should suppress the inherent peroxidatic activity of its heme prosthetic group, we applied a biocompatible immobilization matrix and very low concentrations of the co-substrate H2O2. The biocatalysts were entrapped on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode in a biocompatible chitosan layer which contained gold nanoparticles. The electrochemical signal for the peroxide reduction is generated by the redox conversion of the heme group, whilst a reaction product of the substrate oxidation is cathodically reduced in the substrate indication. The catalytic efficiency of microperoxidase-11 is sufficient for sensors indicating HRP substrates, e.g., p-aminophenol, paracetamol and catechol, but also the hydroxylation of aniline and dehalogenation of 4-fluoroaniline. The lower limit of detection for p-aminophenol is comparable to previously published papers with different enzyme systems. The peroxidatic activity of cyt c immobilized in the chitosan layer for catechol was found to be below 1 per mill and for p-aminophenol about 3% as compared with that of heme or MP-11.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bios2020189DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4263574PMC
May 2012
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