Publications by authors named "Mari-Carmen Jiménez-Sánchez"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Use of contemporary technologies and new materials in undergraduate Endodontics teaching.

J Clin Exp Dent 2021 Apr 1;13(4):e383-e388. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

DDS, MSc, Doctoral fellow, Department of Stomatology, Section of Endodontics, School of Dentistry, University of Sevilla, C/ Avicena s/n, 41009-Sevilla, Spain.

Background: This study aims to analyze the use of contemporary technologies and materials in undergraduate endodontic teaching in Spain.

Material And Methods: The survey was sent to the undergraduate endodontic programme leads in the 23 Spanish dental schools. The survey asked about the use of magnification, ultrasonic devices, electronic apex locator, rotary instruments, root-filling techniques, and bioceramic cements in the teaching of endodontics.

Results: The response rate was 91%, and the final number of schools included in the study was twenty. Only two schools (10%) used magnification (loupes or operative microscope). Five schools (25%) used ultrasonic devices to prepare the access cavity, and four (20%) to activate the irrigation solution. In 14 dental schools (70%) no type of ultrasonic instrument was used. Electronic apex locators in working length determination was used in 19 schools (95%). All schools used rotary instrumentation in the teaching of endodontics, and 45% of schools used reciprocating instruments. Five schools (25%) used warm vertical compaction technique, four (20%) single cone gutta-percha technique, and four (20%) thermoplastic injection techniques. No school used carrier-based gutta-percha. Bioceramic cements were used in 19 of the schools (95%).

Conclusions: Spanish dental schools have incorporated some of the new endodontic technologies and materials, including the electronic apex locator, rotary instruments, and the new bioceramic cements; however, the modern root filling techniques, magnification, and ultrasonic instruments are not yet used in most dental schools. Bioceramic materials, dental schools, endodontic curriculum, magnification, online survey, rotary instrumentation, ultrasonic devices.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.57795DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8020320PMC
April 2021

Relationship between Apical Periodontitis and Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Events: A Cross-Sectional Study.

J Clin Med 2020 Oct 4;9(10). Epub 2020 Oct 4.

Department of Odontostomatolgy, School of Medicine and Health Sciences (Dentistry)-Dental Hospital, University of Barcelona, 08970 L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.

Aim: Both apical periodontitis (AP) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) are associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD), the main cause of cardiovascular events. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of AP and the oral inflammatory burden in control subjects and patients suffering cardiovascular events, analyzing the possible association between AP and the oral inflammatory burden with MetS.

Materials And Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, 83 patients suffering a cardiovascular event were recruited in the study group (SG), and 48 patients without cardiovascular events were included in the control group (CG). Periapical index (PAI) was used to diagnose AP, and total dental index (TDI) was used to assess the total oral inflammatory burden. Diagnosis of MetS was made by meeting three or more American Heart Association Scientific Statement components.

Results: In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, the number of teeth with AP (OR = 2.3; 95% C.I. = 1.3-4.3; = 0.006) and TDI scores (OR = 1.5; 95% C.I. = 1.2-1.9; = 0.001), significantly correlated with cardiovascular events. MetS was strongly associated (OR = 18.0; 95% C.I. = 6.5-49.7; = 0000) with cardiovascular events. Higher TDI scores were significantly associated with MetS (OR = 1.3; 95% C.I. = 1.1-1.6; = 0.003. Neither the number of root-filled teeth (RFT) (OR = 0.9; 95% C.I. = 0.6-1.3; = 0.61) nor the number of teeth with apical periodontitis (OR = 1.1; 95% C.I. = 0.8-1.7; = 0.49) were associated with MetS.

Conclusions: Apical periodontitis is significantly associated with cardiovascular events. Total oral inflammatory burden assessed by TDI, but not AP alone, is associated with MetS.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm9103205DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7600401PMC
October 2020

Correction: Criteria and treatment decisions in the management of deep caries lesions: Is there endodontic overtreatment?

J Clin Exp Dent 2019 Jan 1;11(1):e103. Epub 2019 Jan 1.

MD, DDS, PhD, Department of Stomatology - Endodontic Section, School of Dentistry, University of Sevilla, C/ Avicena S/N, 41009 Sevilla, Spain.

[This corrects the article on p. 751 in vol. 10, PMID: 30305872.].
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.532742DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6343993PMC
January 2019

Criteria and treatment decisions in the management of deep caries lesions: Is there endodontic overtreatment?

J Clin Exp Dent 2018 Aug 1;10(8):e751-e760. Epub 2018 Aug 1.

MD, DDS, PhD, Department of Stomatology - Endodontic Section, School of Dentistry, University of Sevilla, C/ Avicena S/N, 41009 Sevilla, Spain.

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the diagnostic criteria and treatment decisions in the management of deep caries lesions (DCLs). The null hypothesis tested was that DCLs are managed according to the current scientific evidence.

Material And Methods: A total of 288 dentists were contacted directly or by mail, and 125 (43%) were included in the study. Dentists were requested to answer a questionnaire about the routine approach to the diagnosis and treatment of DCLs. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to calculate odds ratios (OR).

Results: Pulp sensitivity tests were used by 65% of dentists when assessing pulpal health in cases of DCLs, particularly those who had followed courses in cariology (OR = 3.8; = 0.005). Dentine hardness was the most frequent criterion used during DCLs excavation (98%). Two thirds of the respondents (65%) removed carious tissue until they felt hard dentine, and feeling hard dentine correlated with caries removal even at the risk of pulpal exposure (OR = 15.8; = 0.0000). Acute transient pain or sensitivity to cold or heat (reversible pulpitis) were considered by 58% of respondents as a reason to provide endodontic therapy.

Conclusions: The null hypothesis tested is rejected. The evidence-based more conservative approach on the management of DCLs is not being translated to clinical dentistry. Root canal treatment is being indicated in cases of DCLs in which the diagnosis is reversible pulpitis. Likewise, it can be concluded that non-conservative management of DCLs, with endodontic overtreatment, could be occurring. Deep caries lesions, dental pulp capping, dental pulp health, dentists, endodontic therapy, pulpal diagnosis, reversible pulpitis, treatment decisions.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4317/jced.55050DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6174009PMC
August 2018