Publications by authors named "Mari Ishii"

9 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Low-Dose Erlotinib Treatment in Elderly or Frail Patients With EGFR Mutation-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Multicenter Phase 2 Trial.

JAMA Oncol 2020 07 9;6(7):e201250. Epub 2020 Jul 9.

Department of Respiratory Medicine and Medical Oncology, Yokohama Municipal Citizen's Hospital, Yokohama, Japan.

Importance: Although the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors for EGFR gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer is well established, optimal dosing remains to be established, especially in elderly or frail patients.

Objective: To investigate the efficacy and safety of low-dose erlotinib in elderly or frail patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

Design, Setting, And Participants: Single-arm phase 2 trial with the Southwest Oncology Group (SWOG) 2-stage design that enrolled frail patients from 21 Japanese institutions after meeting the inclusion criteria. Chemotherapy-naive patients with EGFR-activating mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer who were considered frail based on age, the Charlson Comorbidity Index, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were eligible for the study.

Interventions: Patients were initially administered 50 mg/d erlotinib for 4 weeks, which was modified based on response or adverse events. Dose increase was permitted for patients with stable disease after 4 weeks.

Main Outcomes And Measures: The primary end point was the independent review committee-confirmed objective response rate (ORR) at the dose of 50 mg/d. The study also evaluated the pharmacokinetics of low-dose erlotinib and influence of ABCB1 gene polymorphisms.

Results: Eighty patients were enrolled, with a median (range) age of 80 (49-90) years; 54 (68%) were men. An independent review committee confirmed a significant ORR of 60.0% (90% CI, 50.2%-69.2%). The disease control rate was 90.0% (90% CI, 82.7%-94.9%), median progression-free survival was 9.3 months (95% CI, 7.2-11.4 months), and median overall survival was 26.2 months (95% CI, 21.9-30.4 months). Mild adverse events were observed in some participants, with few patients exhibiting grade 3 or greater adverse events. Low-dose erlotinib treatment was temporarily suspended for 10 patients owing to adverse events. Five of 80 patients (6%) had their erlotinib dose reduced to 25 mg because of oral mucositis, paronychia, erythema multiforme, diarrhea, and anorexia. Two patients discontinued treatment because of adverse events (cutaneous ulcer and bone infection, and oral mucositis, respectively). There were no cases of interstitial lung disease or treatment-related deaths. The median (range) erlotinib plasma concentration was measured at 685 (153-1950) ng/mL. Seventy-three patients discontinued study treatment owing to disease progression (n = 60), death (n = 3), AEs (n = 4), and patient requests (n = 6). No clear association was observed between the pharmacokinetics of low-dose erlotinib and the treatment outcome.

Conclusions And Relevance: Low-dose erlotinib appears to be safe and effective in elderly or frail patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer and can be a valid treatment option.

Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR Identifier: UMIN000015949.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.1250DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7226294PMC
July 2020

Prospective evaluation of the G8 screening tool for prognostication of survival in elderly patients with lung cancer: A single-institution study.

PLoS One 2019 17;14(1):e0210499. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yokohama Municipal Citizen's Hospital, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.

The G8 questionnaire is a quick and easy-to-use screening tool. Several studies reported that the G8 questionnaire had a high sensitivity for predicting abnormalities in the full comprehensive geriatric assessment and predicted functional decline and survival in elderly cancer patients. The present study aimed to evaluate the role of the G8 questionnaire for predicting clinical outcomes and overall survival (OS) in elderly patients with lung cancer, who received chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. The data of 101 lung cancer patients aged ≥70 years, who were hospitalized between September 2011 and August 2014, were analyzed. Of these patients (median age, 77 years), 83 (82%) had impaired G8 scores. The proportion of patients with an impaired G8 score was significantly higher in patients aged ≥80 years than those aged <80 years (p = 0.04). All 18 patients with a normal G8 score possessed an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) of 0 or 1, and none of the patients with a normal G8 score had an ECOG PS of ≥2 (p < 0.0001). An impaired G8 score tended to correlate with a relative dose intensity of <0.65 in patients who received chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy (p = 0.05, odds ratio = 5.40). In the univariate analysis, an ECOG PS of ≥2 and an impaired G8 score were significantly associated with a poor OS (p = 0.009 and p = 0.003, respectively). Moreover, in the multivariate analysis, an ECOG PS of ≥2 (HR 2.55; 95% CI, 1.23-5.30; p = 0.01) and an impaired G8 score (HR 3.86; 95% CI, 1.44-13.36; p = 0.006) were remained independent prognostic factor for OS. G8 screening tool is useful for the prognostication of elderly lung cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. These finding suggest that the G8 questionnaire could be a useful tool in treatment decision-making to predict prognosis and prevent patients from receiving inappropriate anti-cancer treatment near the end of life.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0210499PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6336333PMC
November 2019

Comparison of the efficacies of first-generation epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors for brain metastasis in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer harboring EGFR mutations.

BMC Cancer 2018 Oct 22;18(1):1012. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yokohama Municipal Citizen's Hospital, 56 Okazawa-cho, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama-city, Kanagawa, 240-8555, Japan.

Background: Compared with standard chemotherapy, epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) are more effective in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. However, data comparing the efficacies of different EGFR-TKIs, especially regarding the presence of brain metastasis, are lacking.

Methods: EGFR-TKI naive patients with recurrent or stage IIIB/IV NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations, excluding resistance mutations, were enrolled in this study. We retrospectively determined progression-free survival (PFS) using the Kaplan-Meier method with log-rank test in patients treated with either gefitinib or erlotinib, cumulative incidence of central nervous system (CNS) progression using the Fine and Gray competing risk regression model, and favorable prognostic factors for CNS progression by multivariate analysis.

Results: Seventy-seven EGFR-TKI-naive patients were started on either gefitinib (n = 55) or erlotinib (n = 22) in our hospital from April 2010 to April 2016. Among the patients with brain metastasis, PFS tended to be longer in the erlotinib than in the gefitinib group. In the analysis of cumulative incidence, the probability of CNS progression was lower in the erlotinib group than in the gefitinib group. Particularly, in a subgroup analysis of the patients with brain metastasis, there was a significant difference between the erlotinib and gefitinib groups (hazard ratio 0.25; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.81; p = 0.021). Of the prognostic factors for CNS progression evaluated, the absence of brain metastasis before EGFR-TKI therapy and receiving erlotinib (vs gefitinib) had a significantly favorable effect on patient prognosis.

Conclusion: Although this was a retrospective analysis involving a small sample size, erlotinib is potentially more promising than gefitinib for treatment of brain metastasis in patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-018-4911-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6196437PMC
October 2018

Phase I/II study of induction chemotherapy using carboplatin plus irinotecan and sequential thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) for elderly patients with limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC): TORG 0604.

BMC Cancer 2017 05 26;17(1):377. Epub 2017 May 26.

Department of Respiratory Medicine, Yokohama Municipal Citizen's Hospital, 56 Okazawa-cho, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.

Background: The role of irinotecan for elderly patients with LD-SCLC has been unclear, and the timing of TRT combined with chemotherapy has not been fully evaluated.

Methods: Patients aged > 70 years with untreated, measurable, LD-SCLC, performance status (PS) 0-2, and adequate organ function were eligible. Treatment consisted of induction with carboplatin on day 1 and irinotecan on days 1 and 8, every 21 days for 4 cycles, and sequential TRT (54Gy in 27 fractions). Carboplatin doses were based on AUC of 4 and 5 (levels 1 and 2, respectively), with a fixed irinotecan dose (50 mg/m). Primary objective of the phase II study was overall responce rate.

Results: Forty-three patients were enrolled and forty-one were finally analyzed (median age: 75 years [range 70-86 years); males 31; PS 0/1/2, n = 22/18/1]. Two patients were excluded because of protocol violation (ascertained to be extensive disease). Twelve patients were accrued at phase I and the number of patients with carboplatin dose-limiting toxicities at levels-1 (n = 6) and -2 (n = 6) were 1(grade 3 hypertension) and 2 (grade 4 thrombocytopenia), respectively. The phase II trial was expanded to 29 additional patients receiving the level 1 carboplatin dose, total of 35 patients. The median number of chemotherapy cycles was 4 (range 1-4), and the median radiation dose was 54Gy (range 36-60). Toxicities were generally mild. There were 4 complete and 27 partial responses (response rate 88.6%). With a median follow-up of 52 months, the median progression-free and overall survival times of phase II were 11.2 and 27.1 months, respectively.

Conclusions: Induction chemotherapy of carboplatin plus irinotecan and sequential TRT was well tolerated and effective for elderly patients with LD-SCLC. Additional confirmatory studies are warranted.

Trial Registration: Trial registration number: UMIN000007352 Name of registry: UMIN. Date of registration: 1/Dec/2006. Date of enrolment of the first participant to the trial: 6/Feb/2007. Clinical trial registration date: 1/Feb/2006 (prospective).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-017-3353-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5446686PMC
May 2017

Acute Gastric Volvulus Successfully Treated by Endoscopic Reduction in a 6-Year-Old Girl and a Review of the Japanese Literature.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2019 Nov;35(11):e217-e219

From the Departments of Pediatrics.

A previously healthy 6-year-old girl suddenly developed severe abdominal pain and nausea. She was diagnosed with acute gastric volvulus, and a nasogastric tube was inserted to decompress the stomach. The volvulus did not reduce spontaneously; therefore, we performed endoscopic reduction on day 3 and were able to treat her successfully. We reviewed the Japanese literature on endoscopic reduction for gastric volvulus in children. Fifteen cases have been reported since 1994. There are no reports of perforation during the procedure. Patients whose general condition is stable and who have no severe anatomic anomalies are good candidates for endoscopic reduction.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001150DOI Listing
November 2019

Early pharmacodynamic assessment using ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron-emission tomography on molecular targeted therapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy for clinical outcome prediction.

Clin Lung Cancer 2014 May 9;15(3):182-7. Epub 2014 Jan 9.

Division of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Aichi, Japan. Electronic address:

Early prediction of therapeutic outcome is important in determining whether the ongoing therapy is beneficial. In addition to anatomical response determined using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria, recent studies have indicated that change in tumor glucose use on or after treatment correlates with histopathologic tumor regression and patient outcomes. This Perspective discusses the use of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) for pharmacodynamic evaluation in a very early phase of treatment to predict clinical outcomes in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. We conducted a study to assess whether early metabolic response determined using FDG-PET correlated with clinical outcomes in patients treated with gefitinib or those treated with carboplatin plus paclitaxel (CP). Early metabolic response to gefitinib, but not CP, correlated with the late metabolic response, anatomical response, progression-free survival, and even overall survival. A rapid effect of molecular targeted agents might not be aptly evaluated using the conventional criteria, eg, RECIST, in a very early phase of treatment before volumetric shrinkage of the tumor. Based on the findings of several studies, and on the findings from our study, use of FDG-PET might enable prediction of clinical outcomes at a very early stage of treatment, especially in patients treated with molecular targeted agents with rapid clinical efficacy.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cllc.2014.01.001DOI Listing
May 2014

A feasibility study of carboplatin plus irinotecan treatment for elderly patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer.

Jpn J Clin Oncol 2014 Feb 13;44(2):116-21. Epub 2013 Dec 13.

*Department of Respiratory Medicine and Medical Oncology, Yokohama Municipal Citizen's Hospital, 56 Okazawa-cho, Hodogaya-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 240-8555, Japan.

Objective: The role of platinum agents plus irinotecan has been unclear for elderly patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer. We conducted a feasibility study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of carboplatin plus irinotecan in preparation for a planned Phase III study.

Methods: Based on another Phase I study, carboplatin area under the curve of four Day 1 plus irinotecan 50 mg/m(2) Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks for four courses was administered. Patients aged ≥70 years with a performance status of 0-2 were eligible. The primary endpoint was feasibility, defined as the percentage of patients who have received three or more courses of chemotherapy. If the feasibility was ≥60% in the first 10 patients, this endpoint would be considered to be met.

Results: Eleven patients were registered. The median age was 77 years, and nine patients had a performance status of 1. Ten patients completed four courses of treatment, and neither dose omission nor modification was required. The feasibility was 91% (10/11) and the relative dose intensity was 76.9%. Because neutropenia was frequently prolonged, the next course was delayed in 53% of all courses. Other toxicities were generally mild, and the only Grade 4 toxicity was hyponatremia. The overall response rate was 90% (9/10), and the progression-free survival and the overall survival were 5.1 and 10.9 months, respectively.

Conclusions: This regimen appears to be feasible and effective. Based on these results, a Phase II/III trial comparing carboplatin plus etoposide with carboplatin plus irinotecan for elderly patients with extensive disease small-cell lung cancer is being planned by the Japan Clinical Oncology Group.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jjco/hyt195DOI Listing
February 2014

A phase I trial of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with non-split administration of docetaxel and cisplatin for dry stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (JCOG9901DI).

Cancer Chemother Pharmacol 2012 Jun 8;69(6):1625-31. Epub 2012 May 8.

Department of Respiratory Medicine and Medical Oncology, Yokohama Municipal Citizen's Hospital, 56 Okazawa-cho, Hodogaya-Ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 240-8555, Japan.

Purpose: This study aimed to establish the maximum tolerated dose of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (cCRT) with conventional administration of the docetaxel (D) plus cisplatin (P) (conv-DP) regimen.

Methods: Patients (aged ≤70 years) with unresectable dry stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and having performance status 0 or 1 and adequate organ function were eligible. They received radiotherapy (60 Gy in 30 fractions) once daily starting on day 2. Concurrent P (day 1; 60 mg/m(2) at Levels 1-3, 80 mg/m(2) at Level 4) and D (day 1; 30 mg/m(2) at Level 1, 40 mg/m(2) at Level 2, 50 mg/m(2) at Levels 3-4) were administered every 4 weeks for 2-4 courses.

Results: Eighteen patients were enrolled (stage IIIA/IIIB, 5/13 patients). Three cases of dose-limiting toxicity were observed in this study, although another 3 cases were added at Levels 2 and 3. Radiotherapy was completed in 15 patients. Seventeen patients received more than 2 courses of chemotherapy. Neither Grade 3/4 esophagitis nor severe hematological events were observed at Levels 1-4. However, dose escalation to Level 5 (P [80 mg/m(2)], D [60 mg/m(2)]) was stopped because the Level 5 dose was the recommended dose (RD) of chemotherapy alone for stage IIIB/IV NSCLC in Japan. Therefore, the RD was determined as D50/P80 mg/m(2) in this cCRT. The objective response rate was 89%, and the median survival time was 23.6 months.

Conclusions: cCRT with non-split DP was a tolerable and effective regimen, and RD was 50/80 mg/m(2) every 4 weeks.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00280-012-1871-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3362714PMC
June 2012

Development of a high-resolution purification method for precise functional characterization of primitive human cord blood-derived CD34-negative SCID-repopulating cells.

Exp Hematol 2011 Feb 26;39(2):203-213.e1. Epub 2010 Nov 26.

Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kansai Medical University, Moriguchi, Osaka, Japan.

Objective: We have successfully identified human cord blood (CB)-derived CD34-negative (CD34(-)) severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)-repopulating cells (SRCs) with extensive lymphomyeloid repopulating ability using the intrabone marrow injection method. In our previous study, a limiting dilution analysis demonstrated the frequency of CD34(-) SRCs in CB-derived 13lineage-negative (Lin(-)) CD34(-) cells to be approximately 1/25,000. In this study, we intended to develop a high-resolution purification method to obtain highly purified CD34(-) SRCs.

Materials And Methods: The pooled CB-derived Lin(-) cells were stained with 13 reported Lin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and 5 more Lin mAb, against CD11b, CD33, CD66c, CD45RA, and CD127. Then 18Lin(-)CD34(high), 18Lin(-)CD34(-), and 13Lin(-)CD34(high)CD38(-) cells were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Stem cell characteristics of these three fractions of cells were analyzed by in vitro cultures and in vivo repopulation assays for evaluation of this new purification method.

Results: A limiting dilution analysis demonstrated the frequency of CD34(-) SRCs in these 18Lin(-)CD34(-) cells to be approximately 1/1,000, which is associated with a seeding efficiency 25 times greater than the previous method. All primary recipient nonobese diabetic/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc(null) mice that received transplants of only two CD34(-) SRCs were highly engrafted with human lymphomyeloid cells at 24 weeks after primary transplantation and showed secondary multilineage repopulating abilities.

Conclusions: We succeeded to highly purify the CD34(-) SRCs using 18Lin mAbs and the intrabone marrow injection technique. This newly developed high-resolution purification method is indispensable to precisely characterize a distinct class of primitive human CB-derived CD34(-) hematopoietic stem cells.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.exphem.2010.11.008DOI Listing
February 2011