Publications by authors named "Margaret Schuneman"

5 Publications

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Preconception and prenatal care--useful tools for providers of women's health.

S D Med 2015 ;Spec No:36-43

Health care providers have a unique opportunity to change the behaviors of their patients. Preconception and prenatal care allow for interventions to abate risky behaviors that can affect not only the woman but also her developing fetus. If we can assist the reproductive age woman in modifying her high-risk activities, there will be improved birth outcomes and healthier mothers to care for their offspring. Alcohol and tobacco use, sexually transmitted infections and obesity are the top four modifiable risk factors. This article will address the impact that these behaviors have on women and tools to assist the health care provider in changing these bad habits and promoting healthy pregnancies. The theory of "fetal origins of disease" is emerging as one of the most powerful and compelling reasons to engage our patients before and during their pregnancy. Preventive medicine needs to start in the womb if we want to have the highest impact on healthy adulthood.
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June 2015

Pregnancy of unknown location.

S D Med 2015 Apr;68(4):163-7

The development of highly sensitive and accurate human chorionic gonadotropin assays as well as the improvement of vaginal ultrasound have allowed for the early detection of pregnancy and have reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with ectopic gestations. One of the byproducts of this increased sensitivity is pregnancy of unknown location (PUL), a term which is used to describe pregnancy in a woman with a positive pregnancy test but no signs of intrauterine or extrauterine pregnancy. A PUL can include an early intrauterine pregnancy, a failing intrauterine/extrauterine pregnancy or ectopic pregnancy. Modern medical management has improved the diagnosis and treatment of early pregnancy and pregnancy loss. In the hemodynamically stable patient with PUL, expectant management has been shown to be safe and allows for confirmatory studies before proceeding with therapy.
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April 2015

Vaccination against the M protein of Streptococcus pyogenes prevents death after influenza virus: S. pyogenes super-infection.

Vaccine 2014 Sep 29;32(40):5241-9. Epub 2014 Jul 29.

Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences, Sanford School of Medicine, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, United States. Electronic address:

Influenza virus infections are associated with a significant number of illnesses and deaths on an annual basis. Many of the deaths are due to complications from secondary bacterial invaders, including Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pyogenes. The β-hemolytic bacteria S. pyogenes colonizes both skin and respiratory surfaces, and frequently presents clinically as strep throat or impetigo. However, when these bacteria gain access to normally sterile sites, they can cause deadly diseases including sepsis, necrotizing fasciitis, and pneumonia. We previously developed a model of influenza virus:S. pyogenes super-infection, which we used to demonstrate that vaccination against influenza virus can limit deaths associated with a secondary bacterial infection, but this protection was not complete. In the current study, we evaluated the efficacy of a vaccine that targets the M protein of S. pyogenes to determine whether immunity toward the bacteria alone would allow the host to survive an influenza virus:S. pyogenes super-infection. Our data demonstrate that vaccination against the M protein induces IgG antibodies, in particular those of the IgG1 and IgG2a isotypes, and that these antibodies can interact with macrophages. Ultimately, this vaccine-induced immunity eliminated death within our influenza virus:S. pyogenes super-infection model, despite the fact that all M protein-vaccinated mice showed signs of illness following influenza virus inoculation. These findings identify immunity against bacteria as an important component of protection against influenza virus:bacteria super-infection.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2014.06.093DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4146501PMC
September 2014

Naturally occurring swine influenza A virus PB1-F2 phenotypes that contribute to superinfection with Gram-positive respiratory pathogens.

J Virol 2012 Sep 6;86(17):9035-43. Epub 2012 Jun 6.

Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA.

A combination of viral, bacterial, and host factors contributes to the severity and overall mortality associated with influenza virus-bacterium superinfections. To date, the virulence associated with the recently identified influenza virus protein PB1-F2 has been largely defined using models of primary influenza virus infection, with only limited assessment in models of Streptococcus pneumoniae superinfection. Specifically, these studies have incorporated isogenic viruses that differ in the PB1-F2 expressed, but there is still knowledge to be gained from evaluation of natural variants derived from a nonhuman host species (swine). Using this rationale, we developed the hypothesis that naturally occurring viruses expressing variants of genes, like the PB1-F2 gene, can be associated with the severity of secondary bacterial infections. To test this hypothesis, we selected viruses expressing variants in PB1-F2 and evaluated outcomes from superinfection with three distinct Gram-positive respiratory pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pyogenes. Our results demonstrate that the amino acid residues 62L, 66S, 75R, 79R, and 82L, previously proposed as molecular signatures of PB1-F2 virulence for influenza viruses in the setting of bacterial superinfection, are broadly associated with enhanced pathogenicity in swine in a bacterium-specific manner. Furthermore, truncated PB1-F2 proteins can preferentially increase mortality when associated with Streptococcus pyogenes superinfection. These findings support efforts to increase influenza virus surveillance to consider viral genotypes that could be used to predict increased severity of superinfections with specific Gram-positive respiratory pathogens.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00369-12DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3416121PMC
September 2012

Inactivated and live, attenuated influenza vaccines protect mice against influenza: Streptococcus pyogenes super-infections.

Vaccine 2011 May 8;29(21):3773-81. Epub 2011 Apr 8.

Division of Basic Biomedical Sciences, University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD, United States.

Mortality associated with influenza virus super-infections is frequently due to secondary bacterial complications. To date, super-infections with Streptococcus pyogenes have been studied less extensively than those associated with Streptococcus pneumoniae. This is significant because a vaccine for S. pyogenes is not clinically available, leaving vaccination against influenza virus as our only means for preventing these super-infections. In this study, we directly compared immunity induced by two types of influenza vaccine, either inactivated influenza virus (IIV) or live, attenuated influenza virus (LAIV), for the ability to prevent super-infections. Our data demonstrate that both IIV and LAIV vaccines induce similar levels of serum antibodies, and that LAIV alone induces IgA expression at mucosal surfaces. Upon super-infection, both vaccines have the ability to limit the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines within the lung, including IFN-γ which has been shown to contribute to mortality in previous models of super-infection. Limiting expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines within the lungs subsequently limits recruitment of macrophages and neutrophils to pulmonary surfaces, and ultimately protects both IIV- and LAIV-vaccinated mice from mortality. Despite their overall survival, both IIV- and LAIV-vaccinated mice demonstrated levels of bacteria within the lung tissue that are similar to those seen in unvaccinated mice. Thus, influenza virus:bacteria super-infections can be limited by vaccine-induced immunity against influenza virus, but the ability to prevent morbidity is not complete.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2011.03.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3084433PMC
May 2011
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