Publications by authors named "Margaret Cook-Shimanek"

7 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

High incidence of brain and other nervous system cancer identified in two mining counties, 2001-2015: insufficient evidence to support association with heavy metal exposure.

Spat Spatiotemporal Epidemiol 2020 11 6;35:100378. Epub 2020 Sep 6.

Public Health and Safety Division, Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, PO Box 202951, Helena, MT, USA 59620.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sste.2020.100378DOI Listing
November 2020

Isocyanate induced allergic contact dermatitis in a university undergraduate student: An occupational dermatitis case report, review of laboratory safety regulations, and implications for campus research.

Am J Ind Med 2020 08 9;63(8):726-732. Epub 2020 Jun 9.

Division of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences, Colorado School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Aurora, Colorado.

A 19-year-old female college undergraduate developed an intensely swollen, erythematous and pruritic rash on the face and hands while working in an optical fabrication lab producing photosensitive polymers. She had no respiratory symptoms. The rash was consistent with contact dermatitis and there was no clinical evidence of respiratory involvement with normal spirometry. A review of the safety data sheets of chemicals used in the laboratory revealed several known sensitizers, including 6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI), dibutyl phthalate, and 2,4,6-tribromophenyl acrylate. Patch testing confirmed the patient's sensitization to HDI. A subsequent worksite visit identified several hazardous chemicals that were used without appropriate hazard communication, training, standard operating procedures, or personal protective equipment. Simple exposure controls were recommended and instituted, and the patient was able to return to work in the laboratory without the recurrence of symptoms. This case demonstrates the importance of hazard identification, communication, and safety training in academic laboratories, for students and workers. A medical evaluation can identify hazards as well as lead to improvements in exposure controls and safe return to research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.23140DOI Listing
August 2020

The Sustainable Energy Transition and Occupational Health.

J Occup Environ Med 2019 06;61(6):e306-e307

ACOEM Section on Environmental Health, Task Force on Climate Change, Washington, DC.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000001602DOI Listing
June 2019

Responsibilities of the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Provider in the Treatment and Prevention of Climate Change-Related Health Problems.

J Occup Environ Med 2018 02;60(2):e76-e81

American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Elk Grove Village, Illinois.

: Workers are uniquely susceptible to the health hazards imposed by environmental changes. Occupational and environmental medicine (OEM) providers are at the forefront of emerging health issues pertaining to working populations including climate change, and must be prepared to recognize, respond to, and mitigate climate change-related health effects in workers. This guidance document from the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine focuses on North American workers health effects that may occur as a result of climate change and describes the responsibilities of the OEM provider in responding to these health challenges.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000001251DOI Listing
February 2018

Medicinal nicotine nonuse: smokers' rationales for past behavior and intentions to try medicinal nicotine in a future quit attempt.

Nicotine Tob Res 2013 Nov 1;15(11):1926-33. Epub 2013 Jul 1.

Preventive Medicine Residency Program, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO;

Introduction: Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) is a proven smoking cessation treatment. Previous research has reported low rates of NRT use among quit attempters. This study analyzed population-level nonuse rates and reasons for not using NRT.

Methods: Data were from the 2008 adult Colorado Tobacco Attitudes and Behaviors Survey (TABS), a population-based, random-digit-dialed telephone survey (n = 14,156). Primary measures were past NRT nonuse and future intentions regarding NRT use among current smokers intending to quit. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify reasons for past NRT nonuse associated with intention to use NRT in the future, adjusted for factors known to influence NRT use.

Results: Nearly, 80% of 1,095 current smokers who intended to quit had never used NRT. The most common reasons for nonuse were belief that "willpower" alone is sufficient for cessation (21.5%), perceived lack of NRT effectiveness (15.6%), and cost (14.3%). Willpower was more widely reported among Hispanics than Anglos (36.9% vs. 14.7%) and nondaily versus daily smokers (30.4% vs. 12.5%). Most previous NRT nonusers reported they would use cold turkey (65.2%) in their next quit attempt; NRT was the next most common choice (15.0%). In multivariate analysis, smokers identifying cost or willpower as a reason for previous nonuse had significantly lower odds of planning to use NRT in a future quit attempt.

Conclusions: The majority of smokers have never used NRT and do not plan to use it in the future. Cost and belief in willpower alone are significant barriers to using NRT in future smoking cessation attempt.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/ntr/ntt085DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3842129PMC
November 2013

Defining an acceptable period of time from melanoma biopsy to excision.

Dermatol Reports 2012 Jan 17;4(1):e2. Epub 2012 Jan 17.

Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO; ; Dermatology Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO; ; Colorado School of Public Health Department of Epidemiology, Aurora, CO, USA.

Melanoma is the most lethal form of skin cancer and it is the second most common cancer among adolescents and young adults. The aim of this work is to determine if surgical intervals differ between four different clinics and between departments within the hospitals, and to compare these to industry standards. Surgical intervals were measured through retrospective chart review at four dermatology clinics. Of 205 melanoma cases, clinic and departmental median surgical intervals ranged 15-36.5 days and 26-48 days, respectively. There was significant association between clinic and time between biopsy and pathology report, time between pathology report and excision, and total surgical interval (P<0.0001, P=0.03, and P<0.0001 respectively). There was significant association between department and time between pathology report and excision, and surgical interval (P<0.0001, and P=0.003 respectively). Pair-wise comparisons detected significantly longer intervals between some clinics and departments (maximum difference 67.3%, P<0.0001). Hypothesis-based, informal guidelines recommend treatment within 4-6 weeks. In this study, median surgical intervals varied significantly between clinics and departments, but nearly all were within a 6-week frame.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4081/dr.2012.e2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4212669PMC
January 2012