Publications by authors named "Maren Geitner"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

[Acute facial paresis as a possible complication of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2].

Laryngorhinootologie 2021 May 11. Epub 2021 May 11.

Klinik und Poliklinik für Hals-Nasen-Ohrenheilkunde und Fazialis-Nerv-Zentrum, Universitätsklinikum Jena.

Although acute facial nerve palsy (Bell's palsy) is explicitly mentioned in the information sheets for vaccines as a possible complication of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2, from our point of view the benefits of the vaccination clearly outweigh the possible risks. At most, if at all, a slightly increased risk can be derived from the previous case reports. In general, the risk of acute facial palsy is described in association with many vaccinations. The risk, if any, does not appear to be a specific risk of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. On the other hand, cases of acute facial palsy as symptom of a COVID-19 disease have also been described, so that the theoretical question arises as to the extent to which the vaccination may prevent rather than promote the occurrence of facial palsy. Ultimately, if acted quickly, acute facial paralysis can be treated well and its severity and sequelae cannot be compared with the severity of a COVID-19 disease and its possible long-COVID sequelae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1501-0470DOI Listing
May 2021

Submandibulektomie.

Laryngorhinootologie 2020 Jul 9;99(7):e1. Epub 2021 Feb 9.

HNO-Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Jena.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1384-4012DOI Listing
July 2020

Systemic therapy for recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer: a population-based healthcare research study in Thuringia, Germany.

J Cancer Res Clin Oncol 2021 Jan 31. Epub 2021 Jan 31.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich Schiller University, Am Klinikum 1, 07740, Jena, Germany.

Purpose: Systemic therapy choice for patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck cancer (R/M HNC) is a challenge. Not much is known about systemic therapies used in daily clinical routine and their outcome.

Methods: Data of all 283 patients with R/M HNC (89.4% male, median age: 60 years) registered for first-line systemic therapy between 2015 and 2018 in the cancer registries of Thuringia, a federal state in Germany, were included. Patient characteristics and treatment patterns were summarized. Exploratory univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted on select of systemic therapy and prognostic factors for overall survival.

Results: The most frequent first-line regimens were platinum-based combinations (71.4%), mainly cetuximab + platinum + 5-fluorouracil (32.5%). 32.5, 13.1, 4.9, and 1.1%, respectively, received, a second, third, fourth, and fifth line of systemic therapy. Median follow-up was 5.5 months. Median real-world overall survival was 16.8 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 11.1-22.6]. Alcohol drinking [hazard ratio (HR) 2.375, CI 1.471-3.831; p < 0.001], no second-line therapy (HR 3.425, CI 2.082-5.635, p < 0.001), and application of three agents compared to one agent in first-line therapy (HR 2.798, CI 1.374-5.697; p = 0.005) were associated to decreased overall survival after start of first-line systemic therapy. Termination of second-line treatment because of deterioration of the general condition was the only independent negative prognostic factor (HR 4.202, CI 1.091-16.129; p = 0.037) after start of second-line systemic therapy.

Conclusions: This study offers useful information, mainly prior to the availability of immunotherapy, on patient characteristics, treatment patterns, and survival in a German real-world population.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00432-021-03535-4DOI Listing
January 2021

Submandibulektomie.

Laryngorhinootologie 2020 07 25;99(7):448-449. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

HNO-Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Jena.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-1123-3680DOI Listing
July 2020

Functional Outcome and Quality of Life After Hypoglossal-Facial Jump Nerve Suture.

Front Surg 2020 19;7:11. Epub 2020 Mar 19.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany.

To evaluate the face-specific quality of life after hypoglossal-facial jump nerve suture for patients with long-term facial paralysis. A single-center retrospective cohort study was performed. Forty-one adults (46% women; median age: 55 years) received a hypoglossal-facial jump nerve suture. Sunnybrook and eFACE grading was performed before surgery and at a median time of 42 months after surgery. The Facial Clinimetric Evaluation (FaCE) survey and the Facial Disability Index (FDI) were used to quantify face-specific quality of life after surgery. Hypoglossal-facial jump nerve suture was successful in all cases without tongue dysfunction. After surgery, the median FaCE Total score was 60 and the median FDI Total score was 76.3. Most Sunnybrook and eFACE grading subscores improved significantly after surgery. Younger age was the only consistent independent predictor for better FaCE outcome. Additional upper eyelid weight loading further improved the FaCE Eye comfort subscore. Sunnybrook grading showed a better correlation to FaCE assessment than the eFACE. Neither Sunnybrook nor eFACE grading correlated to the FDI assessment. The hypoglossal-facial jump nerve suture is a good option for nerve transfer to reanimate the facial muscles to improve facial motor function and face-specific quality of life.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fsurg.2020.00011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7096350PMC
March 2020