Publications by authors named "Marcin Tobółka"

10 Publications

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Impact of land cover and landfills on the breeding effect and nest occupancy of the white stork in Poland.

Sci Rep 2021 Mar 31;11(1):7279. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Department of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71C, 60-625, Poznań, Poland.

Food wastes are among the factors with the greatest effects on animal populations. The white stork is among bird species that clearly profit from feeding at landfills, at least in Western Europe and North Africa. However, the rate and the consequences of this feeding are still unknown in the Central-Eastern European population, which differs from the western population not only in terms of migration routes but also in the greater availability of suitable natural breeding habitats due to less intensified agriculture. The aim of the study was to describe the use of landfills and its consequences in terms of probability of nest occupation and breeding effects in different regions of Poland. Although the most important factors influencing nest-site selection and breeding effect are still habitat quality and weather conditions, distance to landfills is important in selection of nest sites. White storks use landfills most intensively late in the breeding season, independently of the density of breeding pairs. The results suggest that the use of landfills is not currently essential in the Central-Eastern European population of the white stork, does not affect breeding effect, and may be more frequent in non-breeders. However, this phenomenon is still developing and requires continuous monitoring.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-86529-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8012577PMC
March 2021

Campylobacter in wintering great tits Parus major in Poland.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020 Mar 29;27(7):7570-7577. Epub 2019 Dec 29.

Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Ergonomics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, M. Curie Skłodowskiej 9, 85-094, Bydgoszcz, Poland.

Domestic and wild mammals, domestic birds and particularly wild birds are considered to be reservoirs of many species of Enterobacteriaceae, and also important human enteric pathogens, e.g., the bacteria of the genus Campylobacter that occur in their digestive tracts. These species may be vectors of antimicrobial resistance dissemination in the environment, because they may have contact with an environment contaminated with antibiotics. Bird feeders have been suggested as potential dispersal centres between wild wintering birds whose feeding is supported by humans. Therefore, we checked for the presence of Campylobacter bacteria among great tits Parus major, the most common bird species on bird feeders in Poland. Samples (n = 787 cloacal swabs) were collected in urban and rural areas of Poland. Bacterial species were identified using multiplex PCR, and 23 (2.9%) positive tests for Campylobacter spp. were found; in ten samples, C. jejuni was detected. The odds ratio of Campylobacter infection in rural birds was over 2.5 times higher than urban birds. Ten samples with C. jejuni were tested for antibiotic resistance, and all were sensitive to azithromycin, erythromycin and gentamycin, while six isolates were resistant to tetracycline, and five were resistant to ciprofloxacin. Four Campylobacter isolates were resistant to both these antibiotics.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-019-07502-yDOI Listing
March 2020

Determination of nest occupation and breeding effect of the white stork by human-mediated landscape in Western Poland.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2020 Feb 11;27(4):4148-4158. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Institute of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71C, 60-625, Poznań, Poland.

Choosing an appropriate nest site is essential for successful breeding. Changes in land use cause populations of many species to decline although some species adapt to anthropogenic changes. The white stork Ciconia ciconia commonly uses artificial nest sites. Recently, white storks from Western Europe have been using landfills as feeding sites; the beginnings of this process are being observed in Central-Eastern Europe. The study aimed to determine factors influencing the probability of nest occupation and breeding effect in a Central-Eastern European population of white storks. We used long-term data from Western Poland on breeding effect, nest occupation, the structure supporting the nest, the proximity of the nearest landfills, landfill area, and land cover. The probability of nest occupation was significantly dependent on habitat quality (based on the share of the preferred type of land cover), the structure supporting the nest, and landfill proximity within a specific year. The breeding effect was influenced by habitat quality and nesting structure. We demonstrate that the type of nesting structure is an important factor influencing both the probability of nest reoccupation and breeding effect. However, the significance of landfills appears to be growing, and in recent years, storks prefer occupying nests closer to landfills, which may have significant consequences for the population of the white stork.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-019-06639-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7024061PMC
February 2020

Life in a polluted world: A global review of anthropogenic materials in bird nests.

Environ Pollut 2019 Aug 7;251:717-722. Epub 2019 May 7.

Department of Biodiversity, Ecology and Evolution, Complutense University of Madrid, José Antonio Novais, 12, 28040, Madrid, Spain.

Human pressure exerts a significant influence on animals and the environment. One of its consequences, plastic pollution is considered one of the major threats to fauna as well as a significant conservation issue. In this research, we examined the global pattern of one example of avian behavior in response to pollution-namely, the incorporation of anthropogenic materials into nests-as well as the existing knowledge on this subject. Based on 25 articles, we studied 51 populations, involving 24 bird species, and checked 10,790 nests; as a result, we found that incorporation of debris is correlated with increasing human influence on the environment, measured as the Human Footprint Index. Moreover, the probability of debris incorporation is higher in terrestrial than in marine species. We also identified knowledge bias in favor of marine as opposed to terrestrial species: namely, marine species attract more scientific attention than terrestrial. Furthermore, research approaches to these two ecosystems differ. Undeniably, the factors which influence debris incorporation by birds, the scale of this behavior, and particular forms of use of debris in bird nests are aspects which require long-term standardized research. This is the first global review paper on debris incorporation by birds to demonstrate a close link to human pressure as a driver.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.05.028DOI Listing
August 2019

How weather conditions in non-breeding and breeding grounds affect the phenology and breeding abilities of white storks.

Sci Total Environ 2018 Sep 27;636:512-518. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Institute of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71C, 60-625 Poznań, Poland.

Background: It has often been suggested that conditions in wintering grounds affect the breeding abilities of migratory birds. This is known as the carry-over effect. Heretofore, many studies have reported the relationship between conditions in wintering grounds, dates of departure from and arrival at breeding grounds, and breeding success. However, very few studies have shown how these conditions affect the capacity of females for egg production.

Aims: To describe how conditions in the remote non-breeding areas in Africa affect reproductory abilities of migratory birds breeding in Europe.

Methods: We recorded 863 arrival dates for 191 nests (in 2005-16), clutch sizes of 412 clutches, and egg dimensions of 1725 eggs (in 2003-16) of white storks in western Poland. We used generalised climatic indicators such as the Sahel precipitation index (SPI) and Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) to assess conditions in wintering grounds prior to breeding and precipitation and temperature in breeding grounds during the breeding season.

Results: The white stork arrived significantly earlier in seasons preceded by a warmer and rainier March, while conditions in Africa did not affect arrival dates. Females laid more (and larger) eggs in seasons preceded by rainier winters in Africa. Breeding success was not affected by conditions in wintering grounds, but only by the weather during breeding season.

Conclusions: Conditions in wintering grounds may affect migratory birds, not only in terms of their arrival dates, but rather with respect to females' egg production capacities. Studies on stable isotopes may yield more detailed findings as to how this process takes place.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.04.253DOI Listing
September 2018

Factors determining the occurrence of anthropogenic materials in nests of the white stork Ciconia ciconia.

Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 2018 May 13;25(15):14726-14733. Epub 2018 Mar 13.

Institute of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71C, 60-625, Poznań, Poland.

Birds have been using anthropogenic materials for nest construction for the past few decades. However, there is a trade-off between the use of new nesting material, which is often linked to greater breeding success, and the higher risk of nestling mortality due to entanglement or ingestion of debris. Here, we investigate the incorporation of anthropogenic materials into nests of the white stork Ciconia ciconia, based on a long-term study of a population in Western Poland. We recorded at least one item of debris in 50 and 42% of nests at the egg and nestling stages, respectively. More debris was found in nests located in territories with higher number of anthropogenic material in the surrounding environment. We found a relationship between the age of females, the number of debris in the area surrounding a nest, and the number of debris in the nest. We found no significant effect of the total number of debris in nests on clutch size, number of fledglings, or breeding success. Studies on the influence of the age and sex of individuals in understanding this behaviour and its drivers in bird populations should be continued.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-018-1626-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5973955PMC
May 2018

Relatedness of wildlife and livestock avian isolates of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii to lineages spread in hospitals worldwide.

Environ Microbiol 2017 10 9;19(10):4349-4364. Epub 2017 Oct 9.

Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Zielona Góra, Prof. Z. Szafrana Street 1, 65-561 Zielona Góra, Poland.

The natural habitats and potential reservoirs of the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii are poorly defined. Here, we put forth and tested the hypothesis of avian reservoirs of A. baumannii. We screened tracheal and rectal swab samples from livestock (chicken, geese) and wild birds (white stork nestlings) and isolated A. baumannii from 3% of sampled chicken (n = 220), 8% of geese (n = 40) and 25% of white stork nestlings (n = 661). Virulence of selected avian A. baumannii isolates was comparable to that of clinical isolates in the Galleria mellonella infection model. Whole genome sequencing revealed the close relationship of an antibiotic-susceptible chicken isolate from Germany with a multidrug-resistant human clinical isolate from China and additional linkages between livestock isolates and human clinical isolates related to international clonal lineages. Moreover, we identified stork isolates related to human clinical isolates from the United States. Multilocus sequence typing disclosed further kinship between avian and human isolates. Avian isolates do not form a distinct clade within the phylogeny of A. baumannii, instead they diverge into different lineages. Further, we provide evidence that A. baumannii is constantly present in the habitats occupied by storks. Collectively, our study suggests A. baumannii could be a zoonotic organism that may disseminate into livestock.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1462-2920.13931DOI Listing
October 2017

Factors determining presence of passerines breeding within White Stork Ciconia ciconia nests.

Naturwissenschaften 2017 Aug 18;104(9-10):71. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

Institute of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences, Wojska Polskiego 71C, 60-625, Poznań, Poland.

Nests of White Stork Ciconia ciconia are commonly used by various passerines as nesting sites. In this study, we investigated factors determining presence and number of pairs of species breeding within White Stork nests in an extensive farmland in NE Poland. In 133 (57%) out of 233 White Stork nests, we found at least one breeding pair of passerine bird. These were from three species: House Sparrows Passer domesticus (68% of 133 nests with co-breeding), Tree Sparrows Passer montanus (65%), and Starlings Sturnus vulgaris (30%). The probability of breeding passerines within White Stork nests increased with increasing nest thickness, and was significantly higher in currently occupied nests. Sparrows were more likely to breed in White Stork nests located on electricity poles, situated closer to settlements and surrounded mainly by arable fields where meadows were not prevalent. In this paper, we show that White Stork nests are favorable nesting sites for passerines, as they are well insulated and provide an anti-predatory shield.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00114-017-1492-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5562770PMC
August 2017

Constant and seasonal drivers of bird communities in a wind farm: implications for conservation.

PeerJ 2016 19;4:e2105. Epub 2016 Jul 19.

Institute of Zoology, Poznań University of Life Sciences , Poznań , Poland.

Background. One of the most difficult challenges for conservation biology is to reconcile growing human demands for resources with the rising need for protecting nature. Wind farms producing renewable energy have been recognised to be a threat for birds, but clear directives for environmental planning are still missing. Methods. Point counts were performed to study the relationship between eight environmental variables and bird populations in different parts of a year on the largest Polish wind farm between March 2011 and February 2013. Variables potentially related to species richness (Chao 1 estimator) and the abundance of the entire bird community as well as five selected farmland species were analysed with the use of generalized linear mixed models. Results. Some associations between the studied variables and bird populations were season/year specific, while others had a constant direction (positive or negative) across seasons and/or years. The latter were distance to the nearest turbine, field size, number of wind turbines, proximity of settlements and water bodies. Spatial autocorrelation and counting time were significantly correlated with bird population estimates but the directions of these relationships varied among seasons and years. Associations between abundance of individual species and environmental variables were species-specific. Conclusions. The results demonstrated a constant negative relationship between wind turbine proximity and bird numbers. Other environmental variables, such as field size, proximity of settlements and water bodies that also had constant associations with bird populations across seasons may be taken into account when minimizing adverse effects of wind farm development on birds or choosing optimal locations of new turbines.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7717/peerj.2105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4957985PMC
August 2016

How to reduce the costs of ornaments without reducing their effectiveness? An example of a mechanism from carotenoid-based plumage.

Behav Ecol Sociobiol 2016;70:695-700. Epub 2016 Feb 29.

Department of Avian Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Biology, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89, 61-614 Poznań, Poland.

Abstract: Carotenoid-based ornaments are often considered to be honest indicators of individual quality assessed by potential mates. However, males can use a variety of strategies that minimize the amount of costly carotenoids used while retaining the effectiveness of color signaling. Birds could do this by altering pigment intake, metabolism, or its presentation to a potential signal receiver. Here, we propose a new mechanism of lowering the costs of carotenoid displays in birds: differential allocation of pigments within single feathers. We studied the coloration of the yellow terminal tail bands of rectrices of male Bohemian waxwings. Using reflectance spectrometry, we show that the two central rectrices are most intensively colored compared to other rectrices. More detailed analyses reveal that these differences result from feather-specific patterns of rectrices coloration. The outer feather vanes of the outermost rectrices are more intensively colored compared to the inner vanes. However, the central rectrices have equally colored vanes that are, on average, more intensively pigmented than the outermost rectrices. When the waxwing tail is folded, the outermost rectrices are covered by other feathers, except for the narrow, outer vane. Central rectrices, however, form the outermost layers which are not obscured by other tail feathers. Thus, the feather vanes that are the most visible to potential viewers are also the most pigmented. These results support the occurrence of a previously overlooked mechanism to reduce the costs of carotenoid-based ornaments: precise pigment distribution to maximize efficiency of signals within single feathers.

Significance Statement: Males of many bird species use bright carotenoid-based plumage coloration to attract females. These traits are physiologically expensive such that only individuals in prime condition can develop the most vivid colors. Males often "cheat" to obtain attractive appearances at lower costs. We showed that this goal could be achieved by differential deposition of pigments into the most conspicuous feather regions. Bohemian waxwing males have yellow tips on their rectrices of which the outer vanes are more brightly colored compared to the inner vanes. These inner feather vanes are usually covered by other feathers and are, thus, less visible to conspecifics. The only exception is the pair of central rectrices that are fully exposed, and both feather vanes are equally colored. In this species, males minimize the use of costly carotenoid pigments while maintaining elaborate ornamentation of plumage regions that are most visible to potential mates.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00265-016-2090-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4841838PMC
February 2016