Publications by authors named "Marcie S Wright"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Increasing Knowledge and Health Literacy about Preterm Births in Underserved Communities: An Approach to Decrease Health Disparities, a Pilot Study.

Glob J Health Sci 2015 May 17;8(1):83-9. Epub 2015 May 17.

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Introduction: Health disparities can negatively impact subsets of the population who have systematically experienced greater socioeconomic obstacles to health. For example, health disparities between ethnic and racial groups continue to grow due to the widening gap in large declines in infant and fetal mortality among Caucasians compared to Black non-Hispanic or African Americans. According to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, preterm birth remains a leading cause of infant morbidity and mortality. The purpose of our study is to determine if the computer-based educational modules related to preterm birth health literacy and health disparity with a pre-test and post-test can effectively increase health knowledge of our participants in targeted underserved communities within the Richmond-metro area.

Methods: This was a pilot study in the Richmond-Metro area. Participants were required to be over the age of 18, and had to electronically give consent. Descriptive statistics, means and standard deviations, and Paired t-tests were conducted in SPSS 22.0.

Results: There were 140 participants in the pilot study. P<.05 was set as significant and all four modules had a P<.000. The males were not significant with modules: Let's Talk Patient & Provider Communication P<.132 and It Takes a Village P<.066. Preterm birth status yes all of the findings were statistically significant P<.000. Preterm birth status no Let's Talk Patients & Provider Communication was not significant P<.106.

Conclusion: Overall, researchers found that with a strong research methodology and strong content relevant to the community, the participants demonstrated an increase in their knowledge in health literacy and preterm birth.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.5539/gjhs.v8n1p83DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4804064PMC
May 2015

Improving public health through student-led interprofessional extracurricular education and collaboration: a conceptual framework.

J Multidiscip Healthc 2014 10;7:105-10. Epub 2014 Feb 10.

Family Medicine and Population Health, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

In the US, health care professionals are trained predominantly in uniprofessional settings independent of interprofessional education and collaboration. Yet, these professionals are tasked to work collaboratively as part of an interprofessional team in the practice environment to provide comprehensive care to complex patient populations. Although many advantages of interprofessional education have been cited in the literature, interprofessional education and collaboration present unique barriers that have challenged educators and practitioners for years. In spite of these impediments, one student-led organization has successfully implemented interprofessional education and cross-disciplinary collaboration. The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual framework for successful implementation of interprofessional education and collaboration for other student organizations, as well as for faculty and administrators. Each member of the interprofessional team brings discipline-specific expertise, allowing for a diverse team to attend to the multidimensional health needs of individual patients. The interprofessional team must organize around a common goal and work collaboratively to optimize patient outcomes. Successful interdisciplinary endeavors must address issues related to role clarity and skills regarding teamwork, communication, and conflict resolution. This conceptual framework can serve as a guide for student and health care organizations, in addition to academic institutions to produce health care professionals equipped with interdisciplinary teamwork skills to meet the changing health care demands of the 21st century.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S52019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3926462PMC
February 2014

Infant mortality: a call to action overcoming health disparities in the United States.

Med Educ Online 2013 Sep 10;18:22503. Epub 2013 Sep 10.

Assessment and Evaluation, Center on Health Disparities, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23298, USA.

Among all of the industrialized countries, the United States has the highest infant mortality rate. Racial and ethnic disparities continue to plague the United States with a disproportionally high rate of infant death. Furthermore, racial disparities among infant and neonatal mortality rates remain a chronic health problem in the United States. These risks are based on the geographical variations in mortality and disparities among differences in maternal risk characteristics, low birth weights, and lack of access to health care.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3772318PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/meo.v18i0.22503DOI Listing
September 2013

Health disparities among highly vulnerable populations in the United States: a call to action for medical and oral health care.

Med Educ Online 2013 Mar 26;18:1-3. Epub 2013 Mar 26.

Center on Health Disparities, School of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA.

Healthcare in the United States (US) is burdened with enormous healthcare disparities associated with a variety of factors including insurance status, income, and race. Highly vulnerable populations, classified as those with complex medical problems and/or social needs, are one of the fastest growing segments within the US. Over a decade ago, the US Surgeon General publically challenged the nation to realize the importance of oral health and its relationship to general health and well-being, yet oral health disparities continue to plague the US healthcare system. Interprofessional education and teamwork has been demonstrated to improve patient outcomes and provide benefits to participating health professionals. We propose the implementation of interprofessional education and teamwork as a solution to meet the increasing oral and systemic healthcare demands of highly vulnerable US populations.
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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3609999PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3402/meo.v18i0.20644DOI Listing
March 2013

A qualitative study of parental modeling and social support for physical activity in underserved adolescents.

Health Educ Res 2010 Apr 14;25(2):224-32. Epub 2008 Aug 14.

Department of Psychology, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA.

This study obtained qualitative data to assess how parental role modeling and parental social support influence physical activity in underserved (minority, low-income) adolescents. Fifty-two adolescents (22 males, 30 females; ages 10-14 years, 85% African-American) participated in a focus group (6-10 per group, same gender). Focus groups were audiotaped, transcribed and coded by independent raters. Inter-rater reliabilities indicated adequate agreement [inter-rater reliability (r) = 0.84]. Themes were identified for parental role modeling and parental social support. Regarding parental role modeling, adolescents reported that parents engaged in a variety of different types of physical activities with their children such as walking, cycling and playing basketball; however, activity was infrequent. Sex differences were noted in parental social support indicating that female adolescents reported receiving more emotional and negative support for physical activity (being required to play outside with a sibling), while boys reported receiving more tangible types of support for physical activity. Adolescents also generated ideas on how to increase parental social support and in particular tangible support was highlighted as important by both males and females. This study suggests that future interventions should focus on improving parental engagement and tangible support that involve direct participation from parents in physical activities with their adolescents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/her/cyn043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2900883PMC
April 2010