Publications by authors named "Marc Plaisance"

13 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Implant Restorative Options in the Esthetic Zone Anodized versus Zirconia Abutments.

J Oral Implantol 2021 Jun 24. Epub 2021 Jun 24.

Dental College of Georgia.

Restoring  implants  in  the  esthetic  zone  can  be  regarded  as  one  of  the  more  difficult  procedures  in  dentistry.  The  use  of  customized  abutments  has  become  a  common  practice  to  aid  in  the  development  of  a  proper  emergence  profile  of  restorations.  The  standard  material  over  the  years  has  been  titanium,  however,  the  emergence  of  zirconia  as  a  restorative  option  has  become  popular  when  restoring  with  more  translucent  materials  like  lithium  disilicate.  A  compromise  between  strength  and  esthetics  is  anodizing  the  titanium  abutments  to  have  a  yellow  color  to  help  mask  the  grey  hues  from  the  silver  abutments.  This  case  report  aims  to  provide  readers  with  information  comparing  anodized  and  zirconia  abutments  when  restoring  implants  with  lithium  disilicate  restorations  in  the  esthetic  zone.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1563/aaid-joi-D-21-00060DOI Listing
June 2021

Serum Interleukin-26 Is a New Biomarker for Disease Activity Assessment in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

Front Immunol 2021 14;12:663192. Epub 2021 May 14.

Univ Angers, CHU Angers, INSERM, CRCINA, Angers, France.

Objective: Interleukin-26 (IL-26) has a unique ability to activate innate immune cells due to its binding to circulating double-stranded DNA. High levels of IL-26 have been reported in patients with chronic inflammation. We aimed to investigate IL-26 levels in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Methods: IL-26 serum levels were quantified by ELISA for 47 healthy controls and 109 SLE patients previously enrolled in the PLUS study. Performance of IL-26 levels and classical markers (autoantibodies or complement consumption) to identify an active SLE disease (SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score > 4) were compared.

Results: IL-26 levels were significantly higher in SLE patients than in controls (4.04 ± 11.66 and 0.74 ± 2.02 ng/mL; p = 0.005). IL-26 levels were also significantly higher in patients with active disease than those with inactive disease (33.08 ± 21.06 vs 1.10 ± 3.80 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). IL-26 levels correlated with SLEDAI score and the urine protein to creatinine ratio (uPCR) (p < 0.001). Patients with high IL-26 levels had higher SLEDAI score, anti-DNA antibodies levels, and uPCR (p < 0.05). They presented more frequently with C3 or C4 complement consumption. Lastly, IL-26 showed stronger performance than classical markers (complement consumption or autoantibodies) for active disease identification.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that, in addition to classical SLE serological markers, the measurement of IL-26 levels may be a useful biomarker for active disease identification in SLE patients.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2021.663192DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8160525PMC
May 2021

An antibody targeting type III secretion system induces broad protection against Salmonella and Shigella infections.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2021 03 12;15(3):e0009231. Epub 2021 Mar 12.

Université Paris Saclay, CEA, INRAE, Département Médicaments et Technologies pour la Santé (DMTS), SPI, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.

Salmonella and Shigella bacteria are food- and waterborne pathogens that are responsible for enteric infections in humans and are still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in the emerging countries. The existence of multiple Salmonella and Shigella serotypes as well as the emergence of strains resistant to antibiotics requires the development of broadly protective therapies. Recently, the needle tip proteins of the type III secretion system of these bacteria were successfully utilized (SipD for Salmonella and IpaD for Shigella) as vaccine immunogens to provide good prophylactic cross-protection in murine models of infections. From these experiments, we have isolated a cross-protective monoclonal antibody directed against a conserved region of both proteins. Its conformational epitope determined by Deep Mutational Scanning is conserved among needle tip proteins of all pathogenic Shigella species and Salmonella serovars, and are well recognized by this antibody. Our study provides the first in vivo experimental evidence of the importance of this common region in the mechanism of virulence of Salmonella and Shigella and opens the way to the development of cross-protective therapeutic agents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0009231DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7990167PMC
March 2021

Development and validation of a lateral flow immunoassay for rapid detection of VanA-producing enterococci.

J Antimicrob Chemother 2021 01;76(1):146-151

Team ReSIST, INSERM U1184, School of Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, LabEx LERMIT, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.

Background: VRE are nosocomial pathogens with an increasing incidence in recent decades. Rapid detection is crucial to reduce their spread and prevent infections and outbreaks.

Objectives: To evaluate a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) (called NG-Test VanA) for the rapid and reliable detection of VanA-producing VRE (VanA-VRE) from colonies and broth.

Methods: NG-Test VanA was validated on 135 well-characterized enterococcal isolates grown on Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar (including 40 VanA-VRE). Different agar plates and culture broths widely used in routine laboratories for culture of enterococci were tested.

Results: All 40 VanA-VRE clinical isolates were correctly detected in less than 15 min irrespective of the species expressing the VanA ligase and the medium used for bacterial growth. No cross-reaction was observed with any other clinically relevant ligases (VanB, C1, C2, D, E, G, L, M and N). Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 100% for VanA-VRE grown on MH agar plates. NG-Test VanA accurately detects VanA-VRE irrespective of the culture medium (agar and broth). Band intensity was increased when using bacteria grown on vancomycin-containing culture media or on MH close to the vancomycin disc as a consequence of VanA induction. The limit of detection of the assay was 6.3 × 106 cfu per test with bacteria grown on MH plates and 4.9 × 105 cfu per test with bacteria grown on ChromID® VRE plates.

Conclusions: NG-Test VanA is efficient, rapid and easy to implement in the routine workflow of a clinical microbiology laboratory for the confirmation of VanA-VRE.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkaa413DOI Listing
January 2021

A Lateral Flow Immunoassay for the Rapid Identification of CTX-M-Producing Enterobacterales from Culture Plates and Positive Blood Cultures.

Diagnostics (Basel) 2020 Sep 28;10(10). Epub 2020 Sep 28.

Team Resist, UMR1184, School of Medicine of Université Paris-Saclay-INSERM-CEA, LabEx Lermit, 94276 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.

We have developed a lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA), named NG-Test CTX-M MULTI (NG-Test), to detect group 1, 2, 8, 9, 25 CTX-M producers from agar plates and from positive blood cultures in less than 15 min. The NG-Test was validated retrospectively on 113 well-characterized enterobacterial isolates, prospectively on 102 consecutively isolated ESBL-producers from the Bicêtre hospital and on 100 consecutive blood cultures positive with a gram-negative bacilli (GNB). The NG-Test was able to detect all CTX-M producers grown on the different agar plates used in clinical microbiology laboratories. No false positive nor negative results were observed. Among the 102 consecutive ESBL isolates, three hyper mucous isolates showed an incorrect migration leading to invalid results (no control band). Using an adapted protocol, the results could be validated. The NG-Test detected 99/102 ESBLs as being CTX-Ms. Three SHV producers were not detected. Among the 100 positive blood cultures with GNB tested 10/11 ESBL-producers were detected (8 CTX-M-15, 2 CTX-M-27). One SHV-2-producing- was missed. The NG-Test CTX-M MULTI showed 100% sensitivity and specificity with isolates cultured on agar plates and was able to detect 98% of the ESBL-producers identified in our clinical setting either from colonies or from positive blood cultures.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10100764DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7600033PMC
September 2020

Modifications of emergency dental clinic protocols to combat COVID-19 transmission.

Spec Care Dentist 2020 May 24;40(3):219-226. Epub 2020 May 24.

Department of Restorative Sciences, The Dental College of Georgia at Augusta University, Augusta, Georgia.

During the COVID-19 pandemic, incidence rates for dental diseases will continue unabated. However, the intent to prevent the spread of this lethal respiratory disease will likely lead to reduced treatment access due to restrictions on population movements. These changes have the potential to increase dental-related emergency department visits and subsequently contribute to greater viral transmission. Moreover, dentists experience unique challenges with preventing transmission due to frequent aerosol-producing procedures. This paper presents reviews and protocols implemented by directors and residents at the Dental College of Georgia to manage a dental emergency clinic during the COVID-19 pandemic. The methods presented include committee-based prioritization of dental patients, a multilayered screening process, team rotations with social and temporal spacing, and modified treatment room protocols. These efforts aid in the reduction of viral transmission, conservation of personal protective equipment, and expand provider availability. These protocols transcend a university and hospital-based models and are applicable to private and corporate models.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/scd.12472DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7283718PMC
May 2020

Evaluation of In-Flow Magnetoresistive Chip Cell-Counter as a Diagnostic Tool.

Biosensors (Basel) 2019 Aug 31;9(3). Epub 2019 Aug 31.

SPEC, CEA, CNRS, Université Paris-Saclay, CEA Saclay, CEDEX, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France.

Inexpensive simple medical devices allowing fast and reliable counting of whole cells are of interest for diagnosis and treatment monitoring. Magnetic-based labs on a chip are one of the possibilities currently studied to address this issue. Giant magnetoresistance (GMR) sensors offer both great sensitivity and device integrability with microfluidics and electronics. When used on a dynamic system, GMR-based biochips are able to detect magnetically labeled individual cells. In this article, a rigorous evaluation of the main characteristics of this magnetic medical device (specificity, sensitivity, time of use and variability) are presented and compared to those of both an ELISA test and a conventional flow cytometer, using an eukaryotic malignant cell line model in physiological conditions (NS1 murine cells in phosphate buffer saline). We describe a proof of specificity of a GMR sensor detection of magnetically labeled cells. The limit of detection of the actual system was shown to be similar to the ELISA one and 10 times higher than the cytometer one.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/bios9030105DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6784370PMC
August 2019

A multiplex lateral flow immunoassay for the rapid identification of NDM-, KPC-, IMP- and VIM-type and OXA-48-like carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae.

J Antimicrob Chemother 2018 04;73(4):909-915

Service de Pharmacologie et Immunoanalyse (SPI), CEA, INRA, Laboratoire d'Etudes et de Recherches en Immunonalyse, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91191, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.

Objectives: The global spread of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae represents a substantial challenge in clinical practice and rapid and reliable detection of these organisms is essential. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a lateral flow immunoassay (Carba5) for the detection of the five main carbapenemases (KPC-, NDM-, VIM- and IMP-type and OXA-48-like).

Methods: Carba5 was retrospectively and prospectively evaluated using 296 enterobacterial isolates from agar culture. An isolated colony was suspended in extraction buffer and then loaded on the manufactured Carba5.

Results: All 185 isolates expressing a carbapenemase related to one of the Carba5 targets were correctly and unambiguously detected in <15 min. All other isolates gave negative results except those producing OXA-163 and OXA-405, which are considered low-activity carbapenemases. No cross-reaction was observed with non-targeted carbapenemases, ESBLs, AmpCs or oxacillinases (OXA-1, -2, -9 and -10). Overall, this assay reached 100% sensitivity and 95.3% (retrospectively) to 100% (prospectively) specificity.

Conclusions: Carba5 is efficient, rapid and easy to implement in the routine workflow of a clinical microbiology laboratory for confirmation of the five main carbapenemases encountered in Enterobacteriaceae.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkx521DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5890661PMC
April 2018

Highly sensitive sandwich immunoassay and immunochromatographic test for the detection of Clostridial epsilon toxin in complex matrices.

PLoS One 2017 11;12(7):e0181013. Epub 2017 Jul 11.

Service de Pharmacologie et Immunoanalyse (SPI), CEA, INRA, Université Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.

Epsilon toxin is one of the four major toxins of Clostridium perfringens. It is the third most potent clostridial toxin after botulinum and tetanus toxins and is thus considered as a potential biological weapon classified as category B by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In the case of a bioterrorist attack, there will be a need for a rapid, sensitive and specific detection method to monitor food and water contamination by this toxin, and for a simple human diagnostic test. We have produced and characterized five monoclonal antibodies against common epitopes of epsilon toxin and prototoxin. Three of them neutralize the cytotoxic effects of epsilon toxin in vitro. With these antibodies, we have developed highly sensitive tests, overnight and 4-h sandwich enzyme immunoassays and an immunochromatographic test performed in 20 min, reaching detection limits of at least 5 pg/mL (0.15 pM), 30 pg/mL (0.9 pM) and 100 pg/mL (3.5 pM) in buffer, respectively. These tests were also evaluated for detection of epsilon toxin in different matrices: milk and tap water for biological threat detection, serum, stool and intestinal content for human or veterinary diagnostic purposes. Detection limits in these complex matrices were at least 5-fold better than those described in the literature (around 1 to 5 ng/mL), reaching 10 to 300 pg/mL using the enzyme immunoassay and 100 to 2000 pg/mL using the immunochromatographic test.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0181013PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5507444PMC
September 2017

Role of T3SS-1 SipD Protein in Protecting Mice against Non-typhoidal Salmonella Typhimurium.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2016 12 19;10(12):e0005207. Epub 2016 Dec 19.

Service de Pharmacologie et Immunoanalyse (SPI), CEA, INRA, Université Paris-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette, France.

Background: Salmonella enterica species are enteric pathogens that cause severe diseases ranging from self-limiting gastroenteritis to enteric fever and sepsis in humans. These infectious diseases are still the major cause of morbidity and mortality in low-income countries, especially in children younger than 5 years and immunocompromised adults. Vaccines targeting typhoidal diseases are already marketed, but none protect against non-typhoidal Salmonella. The existence of multiple non-typhoidal Salmonella serotypes as well as emerging antibiotic resistance highlight the need for development of a broad-spectrum protective vaccine. All Salmonella spp. utilize two type III Secretion Systems (T3SS 1 and 2) to initiate infection, allow replication in phagocytic cells and induce systemic disease. T3SS-1, which is essential to invade epithelial cells and cross the barrier, forms an extracellular needle and syringe necessary to inject effector proteins into the host cell. PrgI and SipD form, respectively, the T3SS-1 needle and the tip complex at the top of the needle. Because they are common and highly conserved in all virulent Salmonella spp., they might be ideal candidate antigens for a subunit-based, broad-spectrum vaccine.

Principal Findings: We investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of PrgI and SipD administered by subcutaneous, intranasal and oral routes, alone or combined, in a mouse model of Salmonella intestinal challenge. Robust IgG (in all immunization routes) and IgA (in intranasal and oral immunization routes) antibody responses were induced against both proteins, particularly SipD. Mice orally immunized with SipD alone or SipD combined with PrgI were protected against lethal intestinal challenge with Salmonella Typhimurium (100 Lethal Dose 50%) depending on antigen, route and adjuvant.

Conclusions And Significance: Salmonella T3SS SipD is a promising antigen for the development of a protective Salmonella vaccine, and could be developed for vaccination in tropical endemic areas to control infant mortality.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005207DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5167260PMC
December 2016

Membrane actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3 are mediated by Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in bone and cartilage cells.

J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 2015 Jan 26;145:65-74. Epub 2014 Sep 26.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, 601 West Main Street, Richmond, VA 23284, USA.

1α,25(OH)2D3 regulates osteoblasts and chondrocytes via its membrane-associated receptor, protein disulfide isomerase A3 (Pdia3) in caveolae. 1α,25(OH)2D3 binding to Pdia3 leads to phospholipase-A2 (PLA2)-activating protein (PLAA) activation, stimulating cytosolic PLA2 and resulting in prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release and PKCα activation, subsequently stimulating differentiation. However, how PLAA transmits the signal to cPLA2 is unknown. Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) activation is required for PLA2 activation in vascular smooth muscle cells, suggesting a similar role in 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent signaling. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the roles of CaM and CaMKII as mediators of 1α,25(OH)2D3-stimulated PLAA-dependent activation of cPLA2 and PKCα, and downstream biological effects. The results indicated that 1α,25(OH)2D3 and PLAA-peptide increased CaMKII activity within 9 min. Silencing Cav-1, Pdia3 or Plaa in osteoblasts suppressed this effect. Similarly, antibodies against Plaa or Pdia3 blocked 1α,25(OH)2D3-dependent CaMKII. Caveolae disruption abolished activation of CaMKII by 1α,25(OH)2D3 or PLAA. CaMKII-specific and CaM-specific inhibitors reduced cPLA2 and PKC activities, PGE2 release and osteoblast maturation markers in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. Camk2a-silenced but not Camk2b-silenced osteoblasts showed comparable effects. Immunoprecipitation showed increased interaction of CaM and PLAA in response to 1α,25(OH)2D3. The results indicate that membrane actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3 via Pdia3 triggered the interaction between PLAA and CaM, leading to dissociation of CaM from caveolae, activation of CaMKII, and downstream PLA2 activation, and suggest that CaMKII plays a major role in membrane-mediated actions of 1α,25(OH)2D3.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2014.09.019DOI Listing
January 2015

Fast and simple detection of Yersinia pestis applicable to field investigation of plague foci.

PLoS One 2013 29;8(1):e54947. Epub 2013 Jan 29.

CEA Saclay, iBiTec-S, Service de Pharmacologie et d'Immunoanalyse, Laboratoire d'Etudes et de Recherches en Immunoanalyse, Gif sur Yvette, France.

Yersinia pestis, the plague bacillus, has a rodent-flea-rodent life cycle but can also persist in the environment for various periods of time. There is now a convenient and effective test (F1-dipstick) for the rapid identification of Y. pestis from human patient or rodent samples, but this test cannot be applied to environmental or flea materials because the F1 capsule is mostly produced at 37°C. The plasminogen activator (PLA), a key virulence factor encoded by a Y. pestis-specific plasmid, is synthesized both at 20°C and 37°C, making it a good candidate antigen for environmental detection of Y. pestis by immunological methods. A recombinant PLA protein from Y. pestis synthesized by an Escherichia coli strain was used to produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). PLA-specific mAbs devoid of cross-reactions with other homologous proteins were further cloned. A pair of mAbs was selected based on its specificity, sensitivity, comprehensiveness, and ability to react with Y. pestis strains grown at different temperatures. These antibodies were used to develop a highly sensitive one-step PLA-enzyme immunoassay (PLA-EIA) and an immunostrip (PLA-dipstick), usable as a rapid test under field conditions. These two PLA-immunometric tests could be valuable, in addition to the F1-disptick, to confirm human plague diagnosis in non-endemic areas (WHO standard case definition). They have the supplementary advantage of allowing a rapid and easy detection of Y. pestis in environmental and flea samples, and would therefore be of great value for surveillance and epidemiological investigations of plague foci. Finally, they will be able to detect natural or genetically engineered F1-negative Y. pestis strains in human patients and environmental samples.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0054947PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3558477PMC
July 2013

Neutralising antibodies against ricin toxin.

PLoS One 2011 25;6(5):e20166. Epub 2011 May 25.

CEA, iBiTec-S, Service de Pharmacologie et d'Immunoanalyse, CEA Saclay, Gif sur Yvette, France.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have listed the potential bioweapon ricin as a Category B Agent. Ricin is a so-called A/B toxin produced by plants and is one of the deadliest molecules known. It is easy to prepare and no curative treatment is available. An immunotherapeutic approach could be of interest to attenuate or neutralise the effects of the toxin. We sought to characterise neutralising monoclonal antibodies against ricin and to develop an effective therapy. For this purpose, mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced against the two chains of ricin toxin (RTA and RTB). Seven mAbs were selected for their capacity to neutralise the cytotoxic effects of ricin in vitro. Three of these, two anti-RTB (RB34 and RB37) and one anti-RTA (RA36), when used in combination improved neutralising capacity in vitro with an IC(50) of 31 ng/ml. Passive administration of association of these three mixed mAbs (4.7 µg) protected mice from intranasal challenges with ricin (5 LD(50)). Among those three antibodies, anti-RTB antibodies protected mice more efficiently than the anti-RTA antibody. The combination of the three antibodies protected mice up to 7.5 hours after ricin challenge. The strong in vivo neutralising capacity of this three mAbs combination makes it potentially useful for immunotherapeutic purposes in the case of ricin poisoning or possibly for prevention.
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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0020166PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3102095PMC
September 2011
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