Publications by authors named "Marc Koene"

5 Publications

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High-Power Laser Therapy Improves Healing of the Equine Suspensory Branch in a Standardized Lesion Model.

Front Vet Sci 2020 3;7:600. Epub 2020 Sep 3.

Department of Virology, Parasitology and Immunology, Research Group of Comparative Physiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.

High-power laser therapy is often used as a treatment for human sport injuries but controlled standardized studies on its efficacy are lacking. The technique has also been introduced in the equine field and recently promising results were reported in a retrospective study focusing on 150 sporthorses suffering from tendinopathy and desmopathy of the SDFT, DDFT, suspensory ligament, and suspensory branches. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the effect of high-power laser in a standardized lesion model in horses. Lesions were created in all lateral suspensory branches of 12 warmblood horses. In each horse, 2 of the 4 lesioned branches were treated daily with a multi-frequency high-power laser for 4 weeks. Color Doppler ultrasonography was performed during and after the treatment period. Six horses were euthanized 4 weeks post-surgery (short-term) and 6 were further rehabilitated until 6 months and then euthanized (long-term). High-field MRI evaluation was performed on all cadaver limbs. On ultrasound, transverse size of the lesion was significantly smaller after 2- and 3 months ( = 0.026 and = 0.015) in the treated branches. The expected post-surgery enlargement of the lesion circumference and cross-sectional area (CSA) over time, was significantly lower in the short-term laser treated group ( = 0.016 and = 0.010). Treated lesions showed a significantly increased Doppler signal during treatment ( < 0.001) compared with control. On MRI, in the short and long-term group, the CSA of the lesions was significantly smaller ( = 0.002), and the mean signal significantly lower in the treatment groups ( = 0.006). This standardized controlled study shows that multi-frequency high-power laser therapy significantly improves healing of a suspensory branch ligament lesion.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fvets.2020.00600DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7494822PMC
September 2020

Postoperative complications in equine elective, clean orthopaedic surgery with/without antibiotic prophylaxis.

Tierarztl Prax Ausg G Grosstiere Nutztiere 2018 Apr 4;46(2):81-86. Epub 2018 May 4.

Objective: Retrospective analysis of postoperative complications in equines after clean, orthopaedic surgical procedures in order to detect differences between animals treated with antibiotics and horses without receiving these drugs.

Material And Methods: Details on 652 patients, surgical procedures and surgery-associated complications were compiled from horses being operated between June 2011 and January 2015. Antibiotic-receiving patients (n = 259) were tested for differences in complication rates and characteristics to controls (n = 393).

Results: The total complication rate was 39.1 %. Increased swelling was observed most often (25.6 %), followed by exudation (7.5 %), fever without incisional alterations (2.3 %), suture dehiscence (1.8 %), and seroma (0.8 %). Seven patients (five treated, two controls) developed septic arthritis within a total of 463 arthroscopies (1.5 %). There were no significant differences in the development of postoperative complications, which were seen in 97/259 (37.5 %) antibiotic receiving patients and in 158/393 (40.2 %) controls. The application of perioperative antibiotics was significantly influenced by surgeon (p < 0.0001) and type of surgery (p = 0.0007) and increased with the number of surgical lesions (p = 0.03). In patients undergoing tendovaginoscopy/ bursoscopy, fasciotomy and neurectomy (n = 98), antibiotic prophylaxis was initiated less frequently than in other surgeries, e. g. combinations of surgeries, splint bone extraction, tenotomy, and arthroscopy (n = 554).

Conclusion: Severe complications in equine clean orthopaedic surgery are rare and complication rates in patients either receiving perioperative antibiotics or not were not significantly different.

Clinical Relevance: Based on the results the use of antibiotics appears to be non-essential in uncomplicated elective orthopaedic interventions in the horse.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.15653/TPG-170491DOI Listing
April 2018

An international multi-centre prospective study on the efficacy of an intraarticular polyacrylamide hydrogel in horses with osteoarthritis: a 24 months follow-up.

Acta Vet Scand 2015 Apr 15;57:20. Epub 2015 Apr 15.

Department of Mathematical Sciences, Laboratory of Applied Statistics, University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, DK-2100, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: Polyacrylamide hydrogel (PAAG) was evaluated recently to treat osteoarthritis (OA) in horses with highly encouraging results; however no long term field-study was done to explore its clinical efficacy and lasting effect. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PAAG in improving clinical signs of OA in horses. We hypothesized that lameness grade would significantly improve and the effect would last at least 2 years in osteoarthritic joints treated with PAAG. Forty three horses older than 2 years with OA in only one joint based on clinical evaluation, intra-articular anaesthesia and imaging (radiography) were included in this study. Horses were injected with 2 ml of PAAG into the affected joint and were followed up at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months. Efficacy of PAAG was evaluated by blinded clinical assessment of lameness. Adverse reactions to joint injection were assessed. Data relating to case details, type of activity, joint and limb involved, lameness duration, lameness grading, previous joint treatment, joint effusion grading, radiographic grading, and owner assessment were recorded. Factors associated with the outcome measure "lameness grading" were analyzed using generalized linear mixed model for logistic regression.

Results: At 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up, 59%, 69%, 79%, 81/% and 82.5% of horses were non-lame respectively. Reduction of joint effusion was observed over time. No side effect was observed in the treated joints. There was a significant decrease in lameness grade from baseline to 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months (P < 0.0001) and a significant positive association with joint effusion (P < 0.0001). Estimates for odds ratio (OR) showed that the effect of treatment increased over time (OR for lower lameness from month 1 to month 24 relative to baseline increased from 20 to 58).

Conclusions: PAAG significantly alleviated lameness and joint effusion in osteoarthritic joints. PAAG is a safe and lasting (at least 24 months) OA treatment in horses. PAAG is a promising new treatment for OA in horses.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13028-015-0110-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4403890PMC
April 2015

The influence of temperature and age on the T1 relaxation time of the equine distal limb.

Vet Radiol Ultrasound 2012 May-Jun;53(3):296-303. Epub 2012 Jan 17.

Colorado State University, Veterinary Teaching Hospital, Fort Collins, CO, USA.

The extent of fat suppression using short tau inversion recovery (STIR) imaging is variable between horses. Our aim was to determine if patient's age and/or hoof temperature have an influence on the T(1) relaxation time of bone marrow in the equine distal limb, thereby affecting the suppression of fat signal. Magnetic resonance imaging was conducted on standing horses and cadaver samples using a low-field magnet (0.27 T). The hoof temperature was measured at the lateral side of the coronary band. A modified inversion recovery fast spin-echo (IR-FSE) sequence was used to measure the signal intensity for a range of inversion times (TIs) at six different regions of interest (ROI): (1) distal aspect of the proximal phalanx, (2) proximal aspect of the middle phalanx, (3) distal aspect of the middle phalanx, (4) navicular bone, (5) proximal aspect of the distal phalanx, and (6) distal aspect of the distal phalanx. The T(1) of the bone marrow in the equine distal limb was calculated from the results and was found to increase by 3.13 ± 0.08 (SE) ms/°C. There was no significant effect of age (2-16 years) but the T(1) values measured from the limbs of young (< 1 year) animals were considerably longer (32.6 ± 1.7 (SE) ms). Similar effects of temperature and age were found for all measured ROIs but there were significant differences in the mean values of T(1) , ranging from +7.7 (distal aspect of the distal phalanx) to -13.2 ms (distal aspect of the proximal phalanx).
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1740-8261.2011.01908.xDOI Listing
August 2012

Transoral endoscopically assisted closure of cleft palate in foals.

Plast Reconstr Surg 2008 Nov;122(5):166e-167e

Klinik für Mund-, Kiefer-und Gesichtschirurgie; Plastische Operationen; Spezielle Schmerztherapie; Klinikum Bremen-Mitte; Bremen, Germany(Krause, Rustemeyer) Tierärztliche Klinik für Pferde; Lüsche, Germany(Koene).

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PRS.0b013e318186cd1bDOI Listing
November 2008