Publications by authors named "Marc Antoine Vaudreuil"

5 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Acclimatization of microbial community of submerged membrane bioreactor treating hospital wastewater.

Bioresour Technol 2021 Jan 8;319:124223. Epub 2020 Oct 8.

Investissement Québec - CRIQ, 333, rue Franquet, Quebec, QC G1P 4C7, Canada.

This study was performed to understand the dynamics of the microbial community of submerged membrane bioreactor during the acclimatization process to treat the hospital wastewater. In this regard, three acclimatization phases were examined using a mixture of synthetic wastewater (SWW) and real hospital wastewater (HWW) in the following proportions; In Phase 1: 75:25 v/v (SWW: HWW); Phase 2: 50:50 v/v (SWW: HWW); and Phase 3: 25:75 v/v (SWW: HWW) of wastewater. The microbial community was analyzed using Illumina high throughput sequencing to identify the bacterial and micro-eukaryotes community in SMBR. The acclimatization study clearly demonstrated that shift in microbial community composition with time. The dominance of pathogenic and degrading bacterial communities such as Mycobacterium, Pseudomonas, and Zoogloea was observed at the phase 3 of acclimatization. This study witnessed the major shift in the micro-eukaryotes community, and the proliferation of fungi Basidiomycota was observed in phase 3 of acclimatization.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2020.124223DOI Listing
January 2021

A framework for the analysis of polar anticancer drugs in wastewater: On-line extraction coupled to HILIC or reverse phase LC-MS/MS.

Talanta 2020 Dec 22;220:121407. Epub 2020 Jul 22.

Department of Chemistry, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada. Electronic address:

With the consumption of chemotherapy agents, residues of anticancer drugs may be increasingly found in hospital and municipal wastewaters. Quantification of these highly polar micropollutants remains challenging due to poor chromatographic retention on typical reversed phases. This study investigated different solid-phase extraction (SPE) materials for automated on-line preconcentration of complex matrices (hospital and municipal wastewaters) and various chromatographic column options. A hyper crosslinked hydroxylated polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymer SPE sorbent coupled on-line with hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HILIC-MS/MS) yielded suitable limits of detection (LOD: 1-2 ng L) for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and 2',2'-difluorodeoxyuridine (dFdU). Optimization of chromatographic conditions led to a single LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of other cytostatic drugs including cytarabine (CYT), gemcitabine (GEM), methotrexate (MTX), ifosfamide (IFO), cyclophosphamide (CYC) and capecitabine (CAP). The filter membrane for sample pre-treatment, HPLC mobile phase additives, and on-line SPE loading parameters were also investigated. The methods were validated in wastewater matrix with suitable determination coefficients (R range: 0.9982-0.9999), LODs (0.5-5 ng L), accuracy (78-111%), intraday precision (2.6-12%), and interday precision (2.1-13%). The occurrence of cytostatic drugs was examined in field-collected water samples from hospital effluents and municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Canada. CAP (3.7-64 ng L), dFdU (6.1-300 ng L), and MTX (1.8-68 ng L) were frequently detected across both matrix types, while IFO was detected in hospital wastewater (23-140 ng L) but not in municipal WWTPs.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.talanta.2020.121407DOI Listing
December 2020

The bacterial community structure of submerged membrane bioreactor treating synthetic hospital wastewater.

Bioresour Technol 2019 Aug 18;286:121362. Epub 2019 Apr 18.

Centre de Recherche Industrielle du Québec (CRIQ), Quebec, QC, Canada.

The pharmaceuticals are biologically active compounds used to prevent and treat diseases. These pharmaceutical compounds were not fully metabolized by the human body and thus excreted out in the wastewater stream. Thus, the study on the treatment of synthetic hospital wastewater containing pharmaceuticals (ibuprofen, carbamazepine, estradiol and venlafaxine) was conducted to understand the variation of the bacterial community in a submerged membrane bioreactor (SMBR) at varying hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 6, 12 and 18 h. The variation in bacterial community dynamics of SMBR was studied using high throughput sequencing. The removal of pharmaceuticals was uniform at varying HRT. The removal of both ibuprofen and estradiol was accounted for 90%, whereas a lower removal of venlafaxine (<10%) and carbamazepine (>5%) in SMBR was observed. The addition of pharmaceuticals alters the bacterial community structure and result in increased abundance of bacteria (e.g., Flavobacterium, Pedobacter, and Methylibium) reported to degrade toxic pollutant.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biortech.2019.121362DOI Listing
August 2019

Widespread occurrence and spatial distribution of glyphosate, atrazine, and neonicotinoids pesticides in the St. Lawrence and tributary rivers.

Environ Pollut 2019 Jul 2;250:29-39. Epub 2019 Apr 2.

Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address:

The occurrence and spatial distribution of selected pesticides were investigated along a 200-km reach of the St. Lawrence River (SLR) and tributaries in Quebec, Canada. Surface water samples (n = 68) were collected in the summer 2017 and analyzed for glyphosate, atrazine (ATZ), 8 systemic insecticides (acetamiprid, clothianidin, dinotefuran, fipronil, imidacloprid, nitenpyram, thiacloprid, and thiamethoxam) and some metabolites. Overall, 99% of the surface water samples were positive to at least one of the targeted pesticides. The most recurrent compounds were glyphosate (detection frequency: 84%), ATZ (82%), thiamethoxam (59%), desethylatrazine (DEA: 47%), and clothianidin (46%). Glyphosate displayed variable levels (4-3,000 ng L), with higher concentrations in south tributaries (e.g., Nicolet and Yamaska). In positive samples, the sum of ATZ and DEA varied between 5 and 860 ng L, and the sum of 6 priority neonicotinoids between 1.5 and 115 ng L. From Repentigny to the Sorel Islands, the spatial distribution of pesticides within the St. Lawrence River was governed by the different upstream sources (i.e., Great Lakes vs. Ottawa River) due to the limited mixing of the different water masses. Cross-sectional patterns revealed higher concentrations of glyphosate and neonicotinoids in the north portions of transects, while the middle and south portions showed higher levels of atrazine. In Lake St. Pierre and further downstream, cross-sections revealed higher levels of the targeted pesticides near the southern portions of the SLR. This may be due to the higher contributions from south shore tributaries impacted by major agricultural areas, compared to north shore tributaries with forest land and less cropland use. Surface water samples were compliant with guidelines for the protection of aquatic life (chronic effects) for glyphosate and atrazine. However, 31% of the samples were found to surpass the guideline value of 8.3 ng L for the sum of six priority neonicotinoids.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envpol.2019.03.125DOI Listing
July 2019

Synthetic hospital wastewater treatment by coupling submerged membrane bioreactor and electrochemical advanced oxidation process: Kinetic study and toxicity assessment.

Chemosphere 2018 Feb 4;193:160-169. Epub 2017 Nov 4.

Centre de Recherche Industrielle du Québec (CRIQ), 333 Franquet, Québec City, QC, G1P 4C7, Canada.

In this work, the combination of membrane bioreactor (MBR) and electro-oxidation (EO) process was studied for the treatment of a synthetic hospital wastewater fortified with four pharmaceutical pollutants namely carbamazepine (CBZ), ibuprofen (IBU), estradiol (E-E) at a concentration of 10 μg L venlafaxine (VEN) at 0.2 μg L. Two treatment configurations were studied: EO process as pre-treatment and post-treatment. Wastewater treatment with MBR alone shows high removal percentages of IBU and E-E (∼90%). Unlikely for CBZ and VEN, a low elimination percentage (∼10%) was observed. The hydraulic and the solid retention times (HRT and SRT) were 18 h and 140 d respectively, while the biomass concentration in the MBR was 16.5 g L. To enhance pharmaceuticals elimination, an EO pretreatment was conducted during 40 min at 2 A. This configuration allowed a 92% removal for VEN, which was far greater than both treatments alone, with lower than 30% and 50% for MBR and EO, respectively. The MBR-EO coupling (EO as post-treatment) allows high removal percentages (∼97%) of the four pharmaceutical pollutants after 40 min of treatment at a current intensity of 0.5 A with Nb/BDD as electrodes. This configuration appears to be very effective compared to the first configuration (EO-MBR) where EO process is used as a pre-treatment. Toxicity assessment showed that the treated effluent of this configuration is not toxic to Daphnia magna except at 100% v/v. The MBR-EO coupling appears to be a promising treatment for contaminated hospital effluents.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.11.010DOI Listing
February 2018
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