Publications by authors named "María Suárez-Arana"

4 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

MeDiGes Study. Metformin versus insulin in gestational diabetes: Glycemic control, and obstetrical and perinatal outcomes. Randomized prospective trial.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 2021 Apr 19. Epub 2021 Apr 19.

Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital Regional Universitario de Málaga. IBIMA; CIBER de Diabetes y Enfermedades Metabólicas (CIBERDEM).

Background: Gestational diabetes not properly controlled with diet has been commonly treated with insulin. In recent years several studies have published that metformin can lead to, at least, similar obstetrical and perinatal outcomes as insulin. Nevertheless, not all clinical guidelines endorse its use, and clinical practice is heterogeneous.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to test if metformin could achieve the same glycemic control as insulin and similar obstetrical and perinatal results, with a good safety profile, in women with gestational diabetes not properly controlled with lifestyle changes.

Study Design: The MeDiGes study was a multicenter, open-label, parallel arms, randomized clinical trial performed at two hospitals in Málaga (Spain), enrolling women with GDM who needed pharmacological treatment. Women aged 18-45 years, in the second or third trimesters of pregnancy, were randomized to receive metformin or insulin (Detemir and/or Aspart). The main outcomes were: 1. glycemic control (mean glycemia, pre-prandial and postprandial) and hypoglycemic episodes, and 2. obstetrical and perinatal outcomes and complications (hypertensive disorders, type of labor, prematurity, macrosomia, large for gestational age, neonatal care unit admissions, respiratory distress syndrome, hypoglycemia, jaundice). Outcomes were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis.

Results: Between 2016-October and 2019-June 200 women were randomized, 100 to the insulin-treated group and 100 to the metformin-treated group. Mean fasting and postprandial glycemia did not differ between groups, but postprandial glycemia was significantly better after lunch and/or dinner in the metformin-treated-group. Hypoglycemic episodes were significantly more common in the insulin-treated group (55.9% vs 17.7% on metformin, OR 6.118, 95% CI 3.134-11.944, p 0.000). Women treated with metformin gained less weight from the enrollment to the prepartum visit (36-37 gestational weeks) (1.35±3.21 vs 3.87±3.50 Kg, p 0.000). Labor inductions (MET 45.7% vs INS 62.5%, OR 0.506, 95% CI 0.283-0.903, p 0.029) and cesarean deliveries (MET 27.6% vs INS 52.6%, OR 0.345, 95% CI 0.187-0.625, p 0.001) were significantly lower in the MET-group. Mean birth weight, macrosomia and large for gestational age were not different between treatment groups, as well as babies' complications. The lower cesarean delivery rate for women treated with metformin was not associated with macrosomia, large or small for gestational age, or other complications of pregnancy.

Conclusions: Metformin treatment was associated with a better postprandial glycemic control than insulin for some meals, a lower risk of hypoglycemic episodes, less maternal weight gain, and a low rate of failure as an isolated treatment. Most obstetrical and perinatal outcomes were similar between groups.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2021.04.229DOI Listing
April 2021

The association between SARS-CoV-2 infection and preterm delivery: a prospective study with a multivariable analysis.

BMC Pregnancy Childbirth 2021 Apr 1;21(1):273. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Department Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Infanta Sofia University Hospital, San Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid, Spain.

Background: To determine whether severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19 disease) exposure in pregnancy, compared to non-exposure, is associated with infection-related obstetric morbidity.

Methods: We conducted a multicentre prospective study in pregnancy based on a universal antenatal screening program for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Throughout Spain 45 hospitals tested all women at admission on delivery ward using polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) for COVID-19 since late March 2020. The cohort of positive mothers and the concurrent sample of negative mothers was followed up until 6-weeks post-partum. Multivariable logistic regression analysis, adjusting for known confounding variables, determined the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of the association of SARS-CoV-2 infection and obstetric outcomes.

Main Outcome Measures: Preterm delivery (primary), premature rupture of membranes and neonatal intensive care unit admissions.

Results: Among 1009 screened pregnancies, 246 were SARS-CoV-2 positive. Compared to negative mothers (763 cases), SARS-CoV-2 infection increased the odds of preterm birth (34 vs 51, 13.8% vs 6.7%, aOR 2.12, 95% CI 1.32-3.36, p = 0.002); iatrogenic preterm delivery was more frequent in infected women (4.9% vs 1.3%, p = 0.001), while the occurrence of spontaneous preterm deliveries was statistically similar (6.1% vs 4.7%). An increased risk of premature rupture of membranes at term (39 vs 75, 15.8% vs 9.8%, aOR 1.70, 95% CI 1.11-2.57, p = 0.013) and neonatal intensive care unit admissions (23 vs 18, 9.3% vs 2.4%, aOR 4.62, 95% CI 2.43-8.94, p <  0.001) was also observed in positive mothers.

Conclusion: This prospective multicentre study demonstrated that pregnant women infected with SARS-CoV-2 have more infection-related obstetric morbidity. This hypothesis merits evaluation of a causal association in further research.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12884-021-03742-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8016158PMC
April 2021

Poor sleep quality is associated with perinatal depression. A systematic review of last decade scientific literature and meta-analysis.

J Perinat Med 2019 Sep;47(7):689-703

Obstetrics and Gynecology at Malaga University Hospital, Málaga, Spain.

Background Although pregnancy is frequently associated with mental states of happiness, hope and well-being, some physical and psychological changes can contribute to increased sleep disturbances and worsened sleep quality. Sleep quality has been linked to negative emotions, anxiety and depression. The main objective of this paper was to systematically review the impact of sleep during pregnancy on maternal mood, studying the association between objective and subjective measures of sleep quality and perinatal depression. Methods We performed a systematic review according to Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, which included studies published between January 2008 and April 2019, and met the following criteria: (i) studies on pregnant women assessing the effects of sleep quality variables on perinatal mood disorders, (ii) studies published in English and (iii) full paper published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal with full-text format available. Results A total of 36 studies published in the last decade met the inclusion criteria for qualitative review and eight of them were suitable for meta-analysis. Both confirmed the negative effects of poor sleep on perinatal mood. However, qualitative analysis showed that unrepresentative samples and low participation rates falling below 80% biased some of the studies. The standard random-effects meta-analysis showed a pooled size effect [ln odds ratio (OR) 1.49 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.19, 1.79)] for perinatal depression in cases of poor prenatal sleep quality, although heterogeneity was moderate to high [Q 16.05, P ≤ 0.025, H2 2.45 (95% CI 1.01, 13.70)]. Conclusion Poor sleep quality was associated with perinatal mood disturbances. The assessment of sleep quality along the pregnancy could be advisable with a view to offering preventative or therapeutic interventions when necessary.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2019-0214DOI Listing
September 2019

[Obesity and hypertesion in pregnancy].

Nutr Hosp 2018 Jul 9;35(4):751-752. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.20960/nh.2186DOI Listing
July 2018