Publications by authors named "María Rita Santos"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

Continental Origin for Q Haplogroup Patrilineages in Argentina and Paraguay.

Hum Biol 2021 02;92(2):63-80

Instituto Multidisciplinario de Biología Celular (IMBICE), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la Republica Argentina (CONICET)-Comisión de Investigaciones Científicas (CIC)-Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), La Plata, Argentina,

Haplogroup Q originated in Eurasia around 30,000 years ago. It is present in Y-chromosomes from Asia and Europe at rather low frequencies. Since America is undoubtedly one of the continents where this haplogroup is highly represented, it has been defined as one of the founding haplogroups. Its M3 clade has been early described as the most frequent, with pan-American representation. However, it was also possible to find several other haplogroup Q clades at low frequencies. Numerous mutations have been described for haplogroup Q, allowing analysis of its variability and assignment of its geographic origin. We have analyzed 442 samples of unrelated men from Argentina and Paraguay belonging to haplogroup Q; here we report specifically on 27 Q (xM3) lineages. We tested 3 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by amplified product-length polymorphism (APLP) analysis, 3 SNPs for restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, 15 SNPs by Sanger sequencing, and 17 short tandem repeats (STRs). Our approach allowed us to identify five subhaplogroups. Q-M3 and Q-CTS2730/Z780 are undoubtedly autochthonous lineages and represent the most frequent subhaplogroups, with significant representation in self-defined aboriginal populations, and their autochthonous status has been previously described. The aim of present work was to identify the continental origin of the remaining Q lineages. Thus, we analyzed the STR haplotypes for the samples and compared them with haplotypes described by other authors for the rest of the world. Even when haplogroup Q lineages have been extensively studied in America, some of them could have their origin in post-Columbian human migration from Europe and Middle East.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.13110/humanbiology.92.2.01DOI Listing
February 2021

[Social inequities in teenage mothers and the relationship to adverse perinatal outcomes in South American populations].

Cad Saude Publica 2021 11;36(12):e00247719. Epub 2021 Jan 11.

Laboratorio de Epidemiología Genética, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The aim was to explain differences in the rates of adverse perinatal events in teenage mothers with low and high schooling. The sample was collected from the Latin American Colaborative Study of Congenital Malformations (ECLAMC) database. From a total of 2,443,747 births in 93 hospitals, 66,755 live newborns without congenital malformations were recruited from 2000 to 2017. Teenage mothers were classified according to low, medium, and high schooling. A multivariate model was used that included reproductive history, access to health services, demographic and socioeconomic variables, and ethnic group. The Fairlie decomposition model was applied to quantify the contribution of explanatory variables to the adverse perinatal event rates. Of the 66,755 newborns analyzed, 21.1% (n = 14,078) were born to teenage mothers. Distribution of maternal schooling was 24.2%, 59.8%, and 16% for low, medium, and high schooling, respectively. The highest rates of adverse perinatal events were seen in teenage mothers with low schooling. The variable "access to health services" explained 35%, 37%, and 23% of the disparities in low birthweight, prematurity, and intrauterine growth restriction, respectively, among teenage mother with low and high schooling. Low number of prenatal visits was the only risk factor for the two levels of schooling and the variable that best explained the differences between the rates of adverse perinatal events. From the public health perspective, prenatal care represents a low-cost intervention with the possibility of increased implementation through adequate information for the population and systematic measures in primary care.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/0102-311X00247719DOI Listing
March 2021

Fine-scale genomic analyses of admixed individuals reveal unrecognized genetic ancestry components in Argentina.

PLoS One 2020 16;15(7):e0233808. Epub 2020 Jul 16.

Departamento de Ecología, Genética y Evolución, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Similarly to other populations across the Americas, Argentinean populations trace back their genetic ancestry into African, European and Native American ancestors, reflecting a complex demographic history with multiple migration and admixture events in pre- and post-colonial times. However, little is known about the sub-continental origins of these three main ancestries. We present new high-throughput genotyping data for 87 admixed individuals across Argentina. This data was combined to previously published data for admixed individuals in the region and then compared to different reference panels specifically built to perform population structure analyses at a sub-continental level. Concerning the Native American ancestry, we could identify four Native American components segregating in modern Argentinean populations. Three of them are also found in modern South American populations and are specifically represented in Central Andes, Central Chile/Patagonia, and Subtropical and Tropical Forests geographic areas. The fourth component might be specific to the Central Western region of Argentina, and it is not well represented in any genomic data from the literature. As for the European and African ancestries, we confirmed previous results about origins from Southern Europe, Western and Central Western Africa, and we provide evidences for the presence of Northern European and Eastern African ancestries.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233808PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7365470PMC
September 2020

A graph theory approach to analyze birth defect associations.

PLoS One 2020 22;15(5):e0233529. Epub 2020 May 22.

Laboratorio de Epidemiología Genética, Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas-Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CEMIC-CONICET), Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Birth defects are prenatal morphological or functional anomalies. Associations among them are studied to identify their etiopathogenesis. The graph theory methods allow analyzing relationships among a complete set of anomalies. A graph consists of nodes which represent the entities (birth defects in the present work), and edges that join nodes indicating the relationships among them. The aim of the present study was to validate the graph theory methods to study birth defect associations. All birth defects monitoring records from the Estudio Colaborativo Latino Americano de Malformaciones Congénitas gathered between 1967 and 2017 were used. From around 5 million live and stillborn infants, 170,430 had one or more birth defects. Volume-adjusted Chi-Square was used to determine the association strength between two birth defects and to weight the graph edges. The complete birth defect graph showed a Log-Normal degree distribution and its characteristics differed from random, scale-free and small-world graphs. The graph comprised 118 nodes and 550 edges. Birth defects with the highest centrality values were nonspecific codes such as Other upper limb anomalies. After partition, the graph yielded 12 groups; most of them were recognizable and included conditions such as VATER and OEIS associations, and Patau syndrome. Our findings validate the graph theory methods to study birth defect associations. This method may contribute to identify underlying etiopathogeneses as well as to improve coding systems.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0233529PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7244144PMC
September 2020

Limb body wall complex: Its delineation and relationship with amniotic bands using clustering methods.

Birth Defects Res 2019 03 27;111(4):222-228. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

ECLAMC at CEMIC (Centro de Educación Médica e Investigaciones Clínicas), Conicet, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Background: Despite the numerous reports on the limb body wall complex (LBWC), this association has never been adequately defined. Amniotic bands (AB) are frequently present but their role remains unclear. Since most reports were based on clinical and often subjective diagnoses, the aim of this work was to define LBWC and the role of AB, minimizing subjectivity.

Methods: Data were obtained from the ECLAMC maternity hospitals network database. A total of 450 live and stillborn infants, born during 1967-2013, with AB or the LBWC were selected. A hierarchical cluster analysis was used to classify cases into homogeneous groups (sharing similar associated defects); robustness of the classification was confirmed with a discriminant analysis. The frequency of associated defects was compared among groups; those whose frequency differed significantly were included in a logistic regression to establish their association within each group.

Results: The cluster analysis identified two groups: a body wall defect (BWD) predominating in one, AB in the other. These groups were further divided into: BWD (cases with only BWD), AB (with only AB), BWD + AB, and NONE (with neither). Association with caudal defects and lower limb amelia was observed for BWD, with cephalic defects and upper limb amputations for BWD + AB.

Conclusions: The results, obtained with the least possible subjectivity, indicated that BWD and BWD + AB are different conditions. Since BWD specifically associates with amelia, we propose that this defect and not any limb deficiency should be considered as inclusion criterium and that it should be included in the BWD acronym as LBWC.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bdr2.1442DOI Listing
March 2019

[Association between NAT2 polymorphisms with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate in Argentina].

Rev Med Chil 2015 Apr;143(4):444-50

Background: NAT genes are considered candidate genes for the genetic predisposition to non-syndromic Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCLP), since they codify for N-acetyltransferases, enzymes responsible for the biotransformation of arylamines, hydrazine drugs, and a great number of toxins and carcinogens present in diet, cigarette smoke, and environment.

Aim: To determine the association between alleles determining slow acetylator phenotype and the risk of NSCLP.

Material And Methods: We analyzed *5 (481C>T), *6 (590G>A) and *7 (857G>A) alleles which determine the slow acetylator phenotype and *4 (wild type) allele by polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism in 97 progenitor-case trios of NSCLP in Argentinian Obstetric Wards. We evaluated the transmission disequilibrium (TDT).

Results: TDT showed a positive association between allele *5 and NSCLP (odds ratio = 1,6; p = 0,03).

Conclusions: The presence of *5 allele is significantly higher in cases with congenital NSCLP.
View Article and Find Full Text PDF

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0034-98872015000400005DOI Listing
April 2015