Publications by authors named "Manuel Martín-Pérez"

6 Publications

  • Page 1 of 1

CHARACTERIZATION OF LESIONS INDUCED BY SPIROCERCA VULPIS (SPIRURIDAE: SPIROCERCIDAE) IN RED FOXES (VULPES VULPES).

J Wildl Dis 2021 Nov 17. Epub 2021 Nov 17.

Universidad de Extremadura, Facultad de Veterinaria, Departamento de Sanidad Animal, Parasitología, Avda. Universidad s/n, 10003, Cáceres, Spain.

Spirocerca lupi infection in dogs (Canis domesticus) is associated with esophageal lesions that may evolve to a neoplastic stage in the form of esophageal sarcoma. In the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) infected with the closely related Spirocerca vulpis, similar lesions may occur in the stomach, but neoplastic forms have not been reported. We characterize Spirocerca vulpis-induced lesions in the fox, using pathology and immunohistochemical (IHC) techniques. Seventy-one out of 163 Spirocerca vulpis-positive red foxes were selected and subjected to histopathological study. Lesions were classified as patchy or diffuse. Ten patchy and 10 diffuse lesion samples were studied using three IHC markers (CD68, CD3, and CD79α for macrophages, T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes, respectively) and H&E stain for neutrophils and eosinophils. Intensity of necrosis, hemorrhages, and the presence of collagen was also analyzed. Of the S. vulpis-positive red foxes, 96.9% had S. vulpis nodules localized in the gastric area (wall and/or omentum), and 3.1% had nodules in the small intestine. All the samples had a moderate to severe lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Mild eosinophil infiltration was observed in both types of lesions, while neutrophil infiltration was significatively higher in the patchy than in the diffuse lesions. Fibrosis with mature collagen fibers was also predominant in the patchy lesions along with the presence of T lymphocytes and macrophages. Both the patchy and diffuse patterns had very few B lymphocytes. These findings suggest that the diffuse form is an earlier stage of the lesion, which eventually evolves into patchy forms. Neoplastic forms were not seen. Although more studies are necessary, this study describes the lesions, characterizes the inflammatory infiltrates, and establishes a possible evolution of the different pathological forms of S. vulpis infection in the red fox.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.7589/JWD-D-20-00162DOI Listing
November 2021

Molecular survey of Besnoitia spp. (Apicomplexa) in faeces from European wild mesocarnivores in Spain.

Transbound Emerg Dis 2021 Nov 7;68(6):3156-3166. Epub 2021 Jul 7.

SALUVET, Department of Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary, Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

Numerous studies have unsuccessfully tried to unravel the definitive host of the coccidian parasite Besnoitia besnoiti. Cattle infections by B. besnoiti cause a chronic and debilitating condition called bovine besnoitiosis that has emerged in Europe during the last two decades, mainly due to limitations in its control associated with the absence of vaccines and therapeutical tools. Although the exact transmission pathways of B. besnoiti is currently unknown, it is assumed that the parasite might have an indirect life cycle with a carnivore as definitive host. Current lack of studies in wildlife might underestimate the importance of free-living species in the epidemiology of B. besnoiti. Thus, the aim of the present study is to assess the presence of Besnoitia spp. in free-ranging mesocarnivores in Spain. DNA was searched by PCR on faeces collected from wild carnivores as a first approach to determine which species could be considered as potential definitive host candidates in further research. For this purpose, a total of 352 faecal samples from 12 free-living wild carnivore species belonging to the Canidae, Felidae, Herpestidae, Mustelidae, Procyonidae and Viverridae families were collected in seven Spanish regions. PCR testing showed that Besnoitia spp. DNA was present in four faecal samples from red foxes collected in western Spain, an area with the greatest density of extensively reared cattle and associated with high incidence of bovine besnoitiosis in the country. To date, this is the first report of a B. besnoiti-like sequence (99.57% homology) from carnivore faeces in a worldwide context. Red foxes might contribute to the epidemiology of B. besnoiti, although further studies, mostly based on bioassay, would be needed to elucidate the accuracy and extent of these interesting findings.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tbed.14206DOI Listing
November 2021

First detection of species in in Europe.

J Nematol 2021 21;53. Epub 2021 May 21.

Parasitology Area, Department of Animal Health, Veterinary Faculty, University of Extremadura, Cáceres, Spain.

The detection of three sp. infective larvae in two specimens of the dung beetle (Marsham, 1802) from western Spain is reported here for the first time in Europe. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the analyzed specimens belong to the genus , but it was not possible to determine the species identity by the lack of morphological information in the literature and because many of the phenotypic characteristics had not yet fully developed at this juvenile stage. Nevertheless, a phylogenetic analysis using amplified nucleotide sequences has revealed that the studied larvae could be clearly discriminated (< 89% identity) from all the other sequences available in public genetic databases. While our results are limited by the scarcity of genetic information available for this genus, the possibility that the analyzed specimens might correspond to a new species should not be ruled out, and more studies are needed. The results provided in this report indicate that is involved in the transmission cycle of sp. to vertebrates in Europe.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.21307/jofnem-2021-050DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8138951PMC
May 2021

Blastocystis sp. Subtype Diversity in Wild Carnivore Species from Spain.

J Eukaryot Microbiol 2020 03 26;67(2):273-278. Epub 2019 Nov 26.

Parasitology Reference and Research Laboratory, National Centre for Microbiology, Health Institute Carlos III, Ctra. Majadahonda-Pozuelo Km 2, 28220, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain.

The occurrence and molecular diversity of the stramenopile eukaryote Blastocystis sp. was investigated by PCR and sequencing (Sanger and NGS) methods in 380 faecal specimens of free-living carnivores in Spain. Blastocystis sp. was confirmed in 1.6% (6/380) of the specimens analysed. Two samples from a common genet and a fox were successfully subtyped as ST7 by Sanger. Using NGS, ST14 was found in a fox and a European polecat, ST7 in a fox, and two additional foxes presented mixed infections of ST1/ST2/ST4 and ST1/ST2/ST7, respectively. Wild carnivore species could act as carriers of zoonotic Blastocystis subtypes.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jeu.12772DOI Listing
March 2020

Pediatric facial fractures: children are not just small adults.

Radiographics 2008 Mar-Apr;28(2):441-61; quiz 618

Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Av Córdoba s/n, 28041 Madrid, Spain.

Radiologic imaging is essential for diagnosing pediatric facial fractures and selecting the optimal therapeutic approach. Trauma-induced maxillofacial injuries in children may affect functioning as well as esthetic appearance, and they must be diagnosed promptly and accurately and managed appropriately to avoid disturbances of future growth and development. However, these fractures may be difficult to detect on images, and they are frequently underreported. The interpretation of facial radiographs is particularly challenging, and computed tomography (CT) is necessary in many cases to achieve an accurate diagnosis. To keep the radiation dose as low as reasonably achievable, ultrasonography may be used instead of radiography for the initial imaging evaluation when the clinical suspicion of fracture is low; if evidence of fracture is found, CT then may be performed for a more detailed evaluation. Regardless of the modality used, a familiarity with the characteristic imaging features of pediatric facial fractures is necessary for accurate image interpretation. In addition, knowledge of the epidemiologic and anatomic distribution of pediatric facial fractures is helpful. Particular kinds of fracture (nondisplaced, greenstick, displaced, comminuted) tend to occur at specific anatomic sites in children, with the severity and extent of the fracture varying according to the patient's age and the stage of skeletal development. Midfacial fractures and fractures that are severely displaced and comminuted may be accompanied by neurocranial injuries or other complications and should be evaluated at CT with multiplanar reformatting of image data.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/rg.282075060DOI Listing
May 2008

Cherubism associated with neurofibromatosis type 1, and multiple osteolytic lesions of both femurs: a previously undescribed association of findings.

Skeletal Radiol 2005 Dec 11;34(12):793-8. Epub 2005 Aug 11.

Departamento de Anatomía Patológica, Hospital Universitario "12 de Octubre", Carretera de Andalucía Km. 5400, 28041, Madrid, Spain.

We present a patient with neurofibromatosis type 1, with the clinical, radiological and histological features of cherubism mandibular lesions, and multiple osteolytic, geographic lesions in both femurs, consistent with multiple non-ossifying fibromas. We have been unable to find a similar case in the world literature. We discuss our findings in relationship with a number of syndromes that present clinical, radiological or pathological similarities.
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-005-0938-3DOI Listing
December 2005
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